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Cuneiform bones

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Title: Cuneiform bones  
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Subject: Cuneonavicular articulation, Cuboideonavicular articulation, Skeletal system, Bones of skeleton, Axial skeleton
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Cuneiform bones

Cuneiform bones
Bones of the right foot. Dorsal surface.
Identifiers
FMA 24517
Anatomical terms of bone

There are three cuneiform bones in the human foot:

  • the first or medial cuneiform
  • the second or intermediate cuneiform, also known as the middle cuneiform
  • the third or lateral cuneiform

They are located between the navicular bone and the first, second and third metatarsal bones and are medial to the cuboid bone.[1]

Contents

  • Structure 1
    • Muscle attachments 1.1
  • Additional images 2
  • Other animals 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

Structure

There are three cuneiform bones:

  1. The medial cuneiform (also known as first cuneiform) is the largest of the cuneiforms. It is situated at the medial side of the foot, anterior to the navicular bone and posterior to the base of the first metatarsal. Lateral to it is the intermediate cuneiform. It articulates with four bones: the navicular, second cuneiform, and first and second metatarsals. The tibialis anterior and fibularis longus muscle inserts at the medial cuneiform bone.[2]
  2. The intermediate cuneiform (second cuneiform or middle cuneiform) is shaped like a wedge, the thin end pointing downwards. The intermediate cuneiform is situated between the other two cuneiform bones (the medial and lateral cuneiforms), and articulates with the navicular posteriorly, the second metatarsal anteriorly and with the other cuneiforms on either side.
  3. The lateral cuneiform (also known as third cuneiform or external cuneiform) intermediate in size between the other two cuneiform bones, is also wedge-shaped, the base being uppermost. It occupies the center of the front row of the tarsal bones, between the intermediate cuneiform medially, the cuboid laterally, the navicular posteriorly and the third metatarsal in front. The tibialis posterior inserts at the medial cuneiform, while the flexor hallucis brevis originates from it.[3]

Muscle attachments

Muscle Direction Attachment[3]
Tibialis anterior Insertion Medial cuneiform
Fibularis longus Insertion Medial cuneiform
Tibialis posterior Insertion Medial cuneiform
Flexor hallucis brevis Origin Lateral cuneiform

Additional images

Other animals

See also


References

  1. ^ Bojsen-Møller, Finn; Simonsen, Erik B.; Tranum-Jensen, Jørgen (2001). Bevægeapparatets anatomi [Anatomy of the Locomotive Apparatus] (in Danish) (12th ed.). p. 245.  
  2. ^ Bojsen-Møller, Finn; Simonsen, Erik B.; Tranum-Jensen, Jørgen (2001). Bevægeapparatets anatomi [Anatomy of the Locomotive Apparatus] (in Danish) (12th ed.). pp. 364–367.  
  3. ^ a b Bojsen-Møller, Finn; Simonsen, Erik B.; Tranum-Jensen, Jørgen (2001). Bevægeapparatets anatomi [Anatomy of the Locomotive Apparatus] (in Danish) (12th ed.). pp. 364–367.  
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