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Cymbal manufacturers

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Cymbal manufacturers

Cymbal manufacturers manufacture Cymbals for percussionists and other musicians.

Contents

  • Major cymbal manufacturers 1
  • Other cymbal manufacturers 2
    • Bellotti Cymbals 2.1
    • Bettis Custom Cymbals 2.2
    • Roberto Spizzichino 2.3
    • Zyn 2.4
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Major cymbal manufacturers

Other cymbal manufacturers

Bellotti Cymbals

Bellotti cymbal with typical hammered pattern
A stamp from a 1950s-era Bellotti Cymbal

Bellotti was a small Italian cymbal workshop that produced cymbals from the 1950s until the 1970s.[1]

Because so few of these vintage cymbals exist on the market today (they are much less prevalent that some other vintage Italian contemporaries, such as Zanchi) Bellotti remains one of the more obscure names in cymbal manufacturers. Most Bellottis are relatively small 12"-15", and quite heavy. Their craftsmanship displays a fine lathing on top and bottom and very broad, circular-peen hand-hammering. The cast bronze cymbals are of a B20 alloy. The bellholes of most Bellottis are of small aperture, which suggests a fabrication date prior to the 1960s or earlier.[2] Very finely crafted, most existing examples are likely to have been hand or field cymbals, due both to their weight and diameters.

The tell-tale insignia is an embossed stamp on the underside of the cymbal. There are two versions of this stamp. The first simply reads "Bellotti" on capital block letters. The second version also reads "Bellotti," but also incorporates the logo of a bell. Often, Bellottis have an embossment that reads "Italy" or "Made in Italy" in a semicircular pattern. This embossment appears on other Italian cymbals of the 1940s-1960s.

Bettis Custom Cymbals

22 inch medium-thin ride cymbal made by Matt Bettis.
22 inch medium-thin ride cymbal made by Matt Bettis.

Bettis Custom Cymbals is a one-man "artisan" [3] shop run by full-time independent cymbalsmith Matt Bettis. Established in 2006, Bettis Cymbals provides high-end, custom cymbals, hand made using raw cast B20 cymbal blanks supplied by members of the Zildjian family. Beginning in June 2014, the Nomad project began with Matt Bettis travelling across The United States making cymbals on the road in his mobile cymbal shop. Each Bettis Nomad cymbal is marked with a serial number and the location in which the cymbal was made.

Roberto Spizzichino

22" Spizzichino ride

Roberto Spizzichino (1944–2011) was an Italian Jazz drummer and renowned master cymbalsmith. Spizzichino lathed and hand hammered cymbals in his workshop in San Quirico, Tuscany in the tradition of the K Zildjian cymbal makers from Istanbul.

Early in his career, Spizzichino worked for the Italian cymbal company UFIP,[4] providing cymbal development and research. In 1986, after leaving UFIP, Spizzichino started experimenting with his own "Spizz" brand cymbals. Spizzichino also worked for Bespeco, an Italian musical equipment manufacturer. Bespeco still offers a line of machine-made B8 "Spizz" brand cymbals produced according to a process developed by Spizzichino. The Chinese cymbal manufacturer, Wuhan, also produced a limited number of its own "Spizz" brand cymbals during a brief collaboration in 1989 when Spizzichino visited the factory. He was in China to find a source for B20 blanks. Spizzichino was involved in the Wuhan/Spizz cymbals' design but was not involved with the cymbal production and distribution. He was not satisfied with the product and did not wish to be associated with it. Neither the Bespeco "Spizz" or the Wuhan/Spizz cymbals were endorsed by Spizzichino. Recent Spizzichino brand cymbals are crafted from high quality B20 bell bronze discs sourced from Turkey. The first Spizzichinos were made from inexpensive, heavy B20 blanks imported from China. By heating, hand hammering and lathing the material, Spizzichino sought to bring out desirable sound characteristics often lacking in machine-made modern cymbals. Spizzichino became unsatisfied with the purity of the Chinese material after a couple years, and found a different supplier. Roberto Spizzichino's cymbals are coveted by jazz drummers seeking the 'old K sound' and are considered rare and collectable, as he made fewer than 3,500 cymbals during his career. Spizzichino died on November 22, 2011.

Zyn

Zyn cymbals were introduced by Premier in 1950 and marketed as an affordable cymbal. They were made of nickel-silver alloy and could be ordered with 'Olympic' drum kits. Pairs of 'Heavy' Zyn cymbals were available for concert music.

The professional-grade Super Zyn range followed in 1951, realised in B20 alloy. According to Cymbals Today (a contemporary promotional material published by Premier), these instruments were endorsed by a number of professional jazz drummers, such as Ray Ellington and Eric Delaney.[5] Sizes available were 12 inches through 24 inches and in thin, medium-thin, medium or heavy weights.[6] Pairs of heavy cymbals were available in 14, 15 and 16 inch sizes for concert orchestra.

The 5 Star Super Zyn range was announced in 1968, replacing the Super Zyn as Premier's professional-grade cymbal. Like their predecessors, these cymbals were also made of B20 alloy. However, their build was thicker and heavier - similar to the heavy-weight Super Zyns - reflecting contemporary trends in popular music, where denser cymbals were required to meet the increasing volume of amplified instruments. The range began with a 12-inch cymbal, while hi-hats could be specified in 13, 14 or 15 inch pairs. 16, 18, 20 and 22 inch cymbals were all available as a ride, crash, or crash-ride. 'Sizzle' cymbals (fitted with rivets) could be ordered in 18 and 20 inch sizes. Orchestral cymbals were available in 14, 15 and 16 inch pairs.

There was also a budget alternative to the 5 Star Super Zyn, called the 2 Star Super Zyn.

Production of all Zyn types concluded in 1984, replaced by Premier's expanding distribution of Zildjian cymbals. However, the name has since been revived on two occasions, with a German-made Zyn (subtilted 'Made in Germany') appearing in the late 1990s. Unlike previous Zyn cymbals, the logo was now stencilled onto the cymbal, as opposed to being stamped into it. The range consisted of 14 inch hi-hats, 16 and 18 inch 'Crash' cymbals, plus a 20 inch 'Medium Ride'. To date, the most recent reintroduction by Premier was in 2006; the new Zyn was machine-hammered B20 alloy, while the new Super Zyn was combination hand and machine-hammered B20 alloy. Both cymbals were made in China.[7] As with past Zyns, paired cymbals were available for concert orchestra and marching bands. The revival was brief and the cymbals are no longer produced.

See also

References


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local libraryUtil = require('libraryUtil') local checkType = libraryUtil.checkType local mArguments -- lazily initialise Module:Arguments local yesno -- lazily initialise Module:Yesno

local p = {}


-- Helper functions


local function getArgs(frame) -- Fetches the arguments from the parent frame. Whitespace is trimmed and -- blanks are removed. mArguments = require('Module:Arguments') return mArguments.getArgs(frame, {parentOnly = true}) end

local function removeInitialColon(s) -- Removes the initial colon from a string, if present. return s:match('^:?(.*)') end

function p.findNamespaceId(link, removeColon) -- Finds the namespace id (namespace number) of a link or a pagename. This -- function will not work if the link is enclosed in double brackets. Colons -- are trimmed from the start of the link by default. To skip colon -- trimming, set the removeColon parameter to true. checkType('findNamespaceId', 1, link, 'string') checkType('findNamespaceId', 2, removeColon, 'boolean', true) if removeColon ~= false then link = removeInitialColon(link) end local namespace = link:match('^(.-):') if namespace then local nsTable = mw.site.namespaces[namespace] if nsTable then return nsTable.id end end return 0 end

function p.formatPages(...) -- Formats a list of pages using formatLink and returns it as an array. Nil -- values are not allowed. local pages = {...} local ret = {} for i, page in ipairs(pages) do ret[i] = p._formatLink(page) end return ret end

function p.formatPageTables(...) -- Takes a list of page/display tables and returns it as a list of -- formatted links. Nil values are not allowed. local pages = {...} local links = {} for i, t in ipairs(pages) do checkType('formatPageTables', i, t, 'table') local link = t[1] local display = t[2] links[i] = p._formatLink(link, display) end return links end

function p.makeWikitextError(msg, helpLink, addTrackingCategory) -- Formats an error message to be returned to wikitext. If -- addTrackingCategory is not false after being returned from -- Module:Yesno, and if we are not on a talk page, a tracking category -- is added. checkType('makeWikitextError', 1, msg, 'string') checkType('makeWikitextError', 2, helpLink, 'string', true) yesno = require('Module:Yesno') local title = mw.title.getCurrentTitle() -- Make the help link text. local helpText if helpLink then helpText = ' (help)' else helpText = end -- Make the category text. local category if not title.isTalkPage and yesno(addTrackingCategory) ~= false then category = 'Hatnote templates with errors' category = string.format( '%s:%s', mw.site.namespaces[14].name, category ) else category = end return string.format( '%s', msg, helpText, category ) end


-- Format link -- -- Makes a wikilink from the given link and display values. Links are escaped -- with colons if necessary, and links to sections are detected and displayed -- with " § " as a separator rather than the standard MediaWiki "#". Used in -- the template.


function p.formatLink(frame) local args = getArgs(frame) local link = args[1] local display = args[2] if not link then return p.makeWikitextError( 'no link specified', 'Template:Format hatnote link#Errors', args.category ) end return p._formatLink(link, display) end

function p._formatLink(link, display) -- Find whether we need to use the colon trick or not. We need to use the -- colon trick for categories and files, as otherwise category links -- categorise the page and file links display the file. checkType('_formatLink', 1, link, 'string') checkType('_formatLink', 2, display, 'string', true) link = removeInitialColon(link) local namespace = p.findNamespaceId(link, false) local colon if namespace == 6 or namespace == 14 then colon = ':' else colon = end -- Find whether a faux display value has been added with the | magic -- word. if not display then local prePipe, postPipe = link:match('^(.-)|(.*)$') link = prePipe or link display = postPipe end -- Find the display value. if not display then local page, section = link:match('^(.-)#(.*)$') if page then display = page .. ' § ' .. section end end -- Assemble the link. if display then return string.format('%s', colon, link, display) else return string.format('%s%s', colon, link) end end


-- Hatnote -- -- Produces standard hatnote text. Implements the template.


function p.hatnote(frame) local args = getArgs(frame) local s = args[1] local options = {} if not s then return p.makeWikitextError( 'no text specified', 'Template:Hatnote#Errors', args.category ) end options.extraclasses = args.extraclasses options.selfref = args.selfref return p._hatnote(s, options) end

function p._hatnote(s, options) checkType('_hatnote', 1, s, 'string') checkType('_hatnote', 2, options, 'table', true) local classes = {'hatnote'} local extraclasses = options.extraclasses local selfref = options.selfref if type(extraclasses) == 'string' then classes[#classes + 1] = extraclasses end if selfref then classes[#classes + 1] = 'selfref' end return string.format( '
%s
', table.concat(classes, ' '), s )

end

return p-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -- Module:Hatnote -- -- -- -- This module produces hatnote links and links to related articles. It -- -- implements the and meta-templates and includes -- -- helper functions for other Lua hatnote modules. --


local libraryUtil = require('libraryUtil') local checkType = libraryUtil.checkType local mArguments -- lazily initialise Module:Arguments local yesno -- lazily initialise Module:Yesno

local p = {}


-- Helper functions


local function getArgs(frame) -- Fetches the arguments from the parent frame. Whitespace is trimmed and -- blanks are removed. mArguments = require('Module:Arguments') return mArguments.getArgs(frame, {parentOnly = true}) end

local function removeInitialColon(s) -- Removes the initial colon from a string, if present. return s:match('^:?(.*)') end

function p.findNamespaceId(link, removeColon) -- Finds the namespace id (namespace number) of a link or a pagename. This -- function will not work if the link is enclosed in double brackets. Colons -- are trimmed from the start of the link by default. To skip colon -- trimming, set the removeColon parameter to true. checkType('findNamespaceId', 1, link, 'string') checkType('findNamespaceId', 2, removeColon, 'boolean', true) if removeColon ~= false then link = removeInitialColon(link) end local namespace = link:match('^(.-):') if namespace then local nsTable = mw.site.namespaces[namespace] if nsTable then return nsTable.id end end return 0 end

function p.formatPages(...) -- Formats a list of pages using formatLink and returns it as an array. Nil -- values are not allowed. local pages = {...} local ret = {} for i, page in ipairs(pages) do ret[i] = p._formatLink(page) end return ret end

function p.formatPageTables(...) -- Takes a list of page/display tables and returns it as a list of -- formatted links. Nil values are not allowed. local pages = {...} local links = {} for i, t in ipairs(pages) do checkType('formatPageTables', i, t, 'table') local link = t[1] local display = t[2] links[i] = p._formatLink(link, display) end return links end

function p.makeWikitextError(msg, helpLink, addTrackingCategory) -- Formats an error message to be returned to wikitext. If -- addTrackingCategory is not false after being returned from -- Module:Yesno, and if we are not on a talk page, a tracking category -- is added. checkType('makeWikitextError', 1, msg, 'string') checkType('makeWikitextError', 2, helpLink, 'string', true) yesno = require('Module:Yesno') local title = mw.title.getCurrentTitle() -- Make the help link text. local helpText if helpLink then helpText = ' (help)' else helpText = end -- Make the category text. local category if not title.isTalkPage and yesno(addTrackingCategory) ~= false then category = 'Hatnote templates with errors' category = string.format( '%s:%s', mw.site.namespaces[14].name, category ) else category = end return string.format( '%s', msg, helpText, category ) end


-- Format link -- -- Makes a wikilink from the given link and display values. Links are escaped -- with colons if necessary, and links to sections are detected and displayed -- with " § " as a separator rather than the standard MediaWiki "#". Used in -- the template.


function p.formatLink(frame) local args = getArgs(frame) local link = args[1] local display = args[2] if not link then return p.makeWikitextError( 'no link specified', 'Template:Format hatnote link#Errors', args.category ) end return p._formatLink(link, display) end

function p._formatLink(link, display) -- Find whether we need to use the colon trick or not. We need to use the -- colon trick for categories and files, as otherwise category links -- categorise the page and file links display the file. checkType('_formatLink', 1, link, 'string') checkType('_formatLink', 2, display, 'string', true) link = removeInitialColon(link) local namespace = p.findNamespaceId(link, false) local colon if namespace == 6 or namespace == 14 then colon = ':' else colon = end -- Find whether a faux display value has been added with the | magic -- word. if not display then local prePipe, postPipe = link:match('^(.-)|(.*)$') link = prePipe or link display = postPipe end -- Find the display value. if not display then local page, section = link:match('^(.-)#(.*)$') if page then display = page .. ' § ' .. section end end -- Assemble the link. if display then return string.format('%s', colon, link, display) else return string.format('%s%s', colon, link) end end


-- Hatnote -- -- Produces standard hatnote text. Implements the template.


function p.hatnote(frame) local args = getArgs(frame) local s = args[1] local options = {} if not s then return p.makeWikitextError( 'no text specified', 'Template:Hatnote#Errors', args.category ) end options.extraclasses = args.extraclasses options.selfref = args.selfref return p._hatnote(s, options) end

function p._hatnote(s, options) checkType('_hatnote', 1, s, 'string') checkType('_hatnote', 2, options, 'table', true) local classes = {'hatnote'} local extraclasses = options.extraclasses local selfref = options.selfref if type(extraclasses) == 'string' then classes[#classes + 1] = extraclasses end if selfref then classes[#classes + 1] = 'selfref' end return string.format( '
%s
', table.concat(classes, ' '), s )

end

return p
  1. ^ Pinksterboer, Hugo: The Cymbal Book. Hal Leonard Publishers. 1992
  2. ^ Salgado, J. "Vintage Cymbals, an Identification Guide", "Not So Modern Drummer", vol. 12, #6
  3. ^ http://www.drummagazine.com/gear/post/5000-years-in-3000-words-cymbal-history/P5/
  4. ^ http://www.drummagazine.com/gear/post/5000-years-in-3000-words-cymbal-history/P5/
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^
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