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David Anderson (Saskatchewan politician)

 

David Anderson (Saskatchewan politician)

David L. Anderson
MP
Member of the Canadian Parliament
for Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Assumed office
November 27, 2000
Preceded by Lee Morrison
Personal details
Born (1957-08-15) August 15, 1957
Frontier, Saskatchewan
Political party Conservative
Spouse(s) Sheila Anderson
Children Amy and Andrew
Residence Frontier
Profession businessman, farmer
Cabinet Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

David L. Anderson (born August 15, 1957 in Frontier, Saskatchewan) is a Conservative member of the Canadian House of Commons representing Cypress Hills—Grasslands, a position he has held since 2000. He was a member of the Canadian Alliance from 2000 to 2003. He is a businessman, and a farmer. He has received broad based support being re-elected in 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2011 with significant margins.

He serves as the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Contents

  • Early years 1
  • Personal life 2
  • Municipal politics 3
  • Federal politics 4
    • 37th Parliament 4.1
    • 38th Parliament 4.2
    • 39th Parliament 4.3
    • 40th Parliament 4.4
    • 41st Parliament 4.5
  • Canadian Wheat Board comment controversy 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Early years

Anderson was born in Frontier, Saskatchewan and graduated from Frontier High School in 1975. Anderson earned a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science at the University of Regina, and then earned a Masters of Divinity at the Canadian Theological Seminary in 1990.[1]

Personal life

Anderson married his wife Sheila in 1982. They have two adult children, Amy and Andrew, and one grandson, Josiah. Anderson is an active businessman and farmer, he has been farming for over 30 years.[2]

Municipal politics

Anderson served on the Eastend School Division Board from 1994 to 2000, he was a School Board Trustee from 1994-1997 and Chair from 1997 to 2000.[3]

Federal politics

Anderson entered federal politics in 2000, and has represented the federal riding of Cypress Hills-Grassland ever since.

37th Parliament

On November 27, 2000, Anderson was elected as a Canadian Alliance Member of Parliament for the federal riding of Cypress Hills—Grasslands. Anderson won the seat with 18,593 votes – 61.6%, defeating Liberal candidate Marlin Bryce Belt, NDP candidate Keith Murch and Progressive Conservative William Caton.

Anderson was a member of the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food and its Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure.

As a member of the Official Opposition, Anderson served as Critic of the Canadian Wheat Board and Associate Critic of Agriculture.[4]

From 2006 to 2010, Anderson served as Chairman of the National Prayer Breakfast in Ottawa. He has been committed to raising awareness of the need to protect religious freedom around the world, hosting annual Parliamentary Forums on Religious Freedom. In addition, Anderson worked with fellow MP Bev Shipley to present and pass Motion 382, which unanimously declared the Parliament of Canada's support for religious freedom around the world.

38th Parliament

On June 28, 2004, Anderson was re-elected as Conservative Member of Parliament for the federal riding of Cypress Hills-Grasslands. He won the seat with 18,010 votes – 60.63%, defeating Liberal candidate Bill Caton, NDP candidate Jeff Potts and Green Party candidate Bev Currie.[5]

Anderson was a member of the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food.

Anderson introduced Private Member’s Bill, Bill C-285 – An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (exclusion of income received by an athlete from a non-profit club, society or association). Bill C-285 did not come into force, the last stage completed was second reading and referral to committee in the House of Commons.[6]

As a member of the Official Opposition, Anderson served as Critic of the Canadian Wheat Board.[4]

39th Parliament

On January 23, 2006, Anderson was re-elected as Conservative Member of Parliament for the federal riding of Cypress Hills-Grasslands. He won the seat with 20,035 votes – 66.47%, defeating Liberal candidate Bill Caton, NDP candidate Mike Eason and Green Party candidate Amanda Knorr.[7]

Anderson was a member of the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food, and the Standing Committee on Natural Resources.

During the 39th Parliament, Anderson was appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources, Parliamentary Secretary (for the Canadian Wheat Board) to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board.

40th Parliament

On October 14, 2008, Anderson was re-elected as Conservative Member of Parliament for the federal riding of Cypress Hills-Grasslands. He won the seat with 17,922 votes – 64.35%, defeating Liberal candidate Duane Filson, NDP candidate Scott Wilson and Green Party candidate Bill Clary.[8]

Anderson served as a member of Standing of Natural Resources and the Subcommittee on Food Safety of the Stranding Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food.

Anderson was appointed Parliament Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board.

41st Parliament

On May 2, 2011, Anderson was re-elected as Conservative Member of Parliament for the federal riding of Cypress Hills-Grasslands. He won the seat with 20,555 votes – 69.8%, defeating Liberal candidate Duane Filson, NDP candidate Trevor Peterson and Green Party candidate Helmi Scott.[9]

Anderson has served as a member of the Legislative Committee on Bill C-18, the Subcommittee on Bill C-38 of the Standing Committee on Finance, the Standing Committee on Natural Resources, the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development and its Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure.[10]

Anderson served as Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board until September 19, 2013, when he was appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs.[10]

Canadian Wheat Board comment controversy

In October 2011, Anderson mocked Canadian Wheat Board officials on his official Conservative party website[11] by posting a video that national leader of Canadian Inuit Mary Simon immediately denounced for the repeated use of a racial slur.[12] In the video, an animated character uses a pejorative term, Eskimo, which is considered derogatory towards aboriginal peoples in Canada, to suggest that the Canadian Wheat Board officials and the Inuit sound foreign and make no sense.[13][14][15]

References

  1. ^ "Anderson, David – Saskatchewan, Cypress Hills, Conservative Party of Canada".  
  2. ^ "Cypress Hills - Grasslands – 2008 Results".  
  3. ^ "Cypress Hills - Grasslands – Riding Info".  
  4. ^ a b "Anderson, David, B.A., M.Div". Parliament of Canada. 
  5. ^ "Official Voting Results – 2004". Elections Canada. 
  6. ^ "Private Member's Bill – C-285: An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (exclusion of income received by an athlete from a non-profit club, society or association)". Parliament of Canada. 
  7. ^ "Official Voting Results – 2006". Elections Canada. 
  8. ^ "Official Voting Results – 2008". Elections Canada. 
  9. ^ "Official Voting Results – 2011". Elections Canada. 
  10. ^ a b "Members of Parliament – David Anderson – Roles". Parliament of Canada. 
  11. ^ Official website for David Anderson
  12. ^ National Inuit Leader Denounces Racist Slur Included in Animated Video on MP Website
  13. ^ David Anderson would seem to have a lot of free time
  14. ^ Saskatchewan Conservative MP David Anderson's Wheat Board Video: 'You're Talking Eskimo'
  15. ^ 'Talking Eskimo' wheat board video sparks controversy

External links

  • Official site for David Anderson
  • David Anderson - Facebook
  • David Anderson - Twitter
  • David Anderson - Youtube
  • How'd They Vote?: David Anderson's voting history and quotes
  • David Anderson (Saskatchewan politician) – Parliament of Canada biography
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