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Delta, Ohio

Delta, Ohio
Village
Location of Delta, Ohio
Location of Delta, Ohio
Location of Delta in Fulton County
Location of Delta in Fulton County
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Ohio
County Fulton
Government
 • Type Charter Municipality
 • Mayor Dan D. Miller
Area[1]
 • Total 2.67 sq mi (6.92 km2)
 • Land 2.67 sq mi (6.92 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation[2] 722 ft (220 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 3,103
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 3,083
 • Density 1,162.2/sq mi (448.7/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 43515
Area code(s) 419
FIPS code 39-21616[5]
GNIS feature ID 1079943[2]
Website http://www.villageofdelta.org

Delta is a village in Fulton County, Ohio, United States. The population was 3,103 at the 2010 census.

Contents

  • Geography 1
  • Demographics 2
    • 2010 census 2.1
    • 2000 census 2.2
  • Schools 3
  • Early Delta history 4
  • Notable people 5
  • References 6

Geography

Delta is located at (41.575090, -84.002477).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 2.67 square miles (6.92 km2), all land.[1] Delta lies within the watershed of the Maumee River. Bad Creek, a tributary of the Maumee River, flows through the village. Alternate U.S. 20 and State Route 2 pass through the village in an east-west direction. State Route 109 goes through the village in a north-south direction. The Ohio Turnpike runs in an east-west direction approximately two miles north of the village. There is an interchange at the intersection of State Route 109 and the Ohio Turnpike.

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 3,103 people, 1,203 households, and 842 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,162.2 inhabitants per square mile (448.7/km2). There were 1,293 housing units at an average density of 484.3 per square mile (187.0/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 96.1% White, 0.4% African American, 0.5% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.9% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.3% of the population.

There were 1,203 households of which 37.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.4% were married couples living together, 13.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 30.0% were non-families. 26.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.10.

The median age in the village was 35.5 years. 27.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.8% were from 25 to 44; 25.4% were from 45 to 64; and 12.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 48.4% male and 51.6% female.

2000 census

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 2,930 people, 1,134 households, and 831 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,126.7 people per square mile (435.1/km²). There were 1,193 housing units at an average density of 458.7 per square mile (177.2/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 95.94% White, 0.10% African American, 0.55% Native American, 0.10% Asian, 0.20% Pacific Islander, 1.98% from other races, and 1.13% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.49% of the population.

There were 1,134 households out of which 38.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.5% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.7% were non-families. 22.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the village the population was spread out with 28.7% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 30.3% from 25 to 44, 20.5% from 45 to 64, and 13.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 94.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.6 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $41,920, and the median income for a family was $50,543. Males had a median income of $35,784 versus $25,552 for females. The per capita income for the village was $18,959. About 6.9% of families and 9.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.7% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over.

Schools

Delta has a system of public schools known as the Pike-Delta-York Local School District.[9] This was the consolidation of the village school in Delta and the two surrounding township schools (Pike Township and York Township.) After the consolidation, Pike and York were closed, and the only remaining schools are in Delta. Delta High School serves the entire district as its lone secondary school.[10]

Early Delta history

By George P. Monagon and George M. Liscombe published in 1877

Mr. E. L. Waltz, editor and proprietor of the Delta Avalanche, who has been looking into the early history of Delta, furnished the following facts pertaining to the early settlement:

It is generally conceded that the first settler here, or what was then called the " Six Mile Woods" was a Mr. Meeker, who hewed away a place for his residence where S. H. Cately now lives. This was in the fall of 1833. In the spring of 1834 he was followed by others; Mr. William Fewlas and his brother, hailing from Long Island, New York, took up residence here, where Mr. William Fewlas yet resides.

James McQuillin was the first to settle on the site where the village of Delta now stands, in 1834. His cabin stood near where the Presbyterian Church now stands, who also erected a saw mill on the creek, not far from the residence of H. E. Bassett.

From the best information at hand, we learn that the present business portion of Delta was never platted but was staked out in lots and sold to the purchasers in such size lots as was desired, and afterwards sold the location for streets. In later years numerous additions have been regularly laid out and recorded.

The mercantile business of Delta. And among some of the early tradesman were George Robinson, a brother of Mrs. M. H. Butler, who was the first man to bring a stock of goods to this vicinity. Meeker and Lewis were the first men to bring a stock of goods and sell them on the ground where Delta now stands, their store was kept in a cabin that stood where the Centennial Hotel stands. Daniel Cummings was the next to embark in the mercantile trade. Dr. White put up the building now occupied by M.H. Butler and put in it what was then called a good store. John Kennedy next comes on the scene with a small store in a part of the building now occupied as a residence by Dr. Ramsey. Mr. Gates now of Delta, soon became a partner of Mr. Kennedy and from the little shops here mentioned have grown the business that is now seen in the village of Delta.

The growth of the village has been rather slow, as the country was new, and roads bad until about the year 1850, when a plank road was laid from here to Toledo. Following this a large flouring mill was erected, and large brick blocks have taken the place of round log cabin, and instead of the plank road we find the Air Line Division of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad, and instead of the hamlet in the woods, we find a beautiful village of fifteen hundred inhabitants, adorned with churches, schools, and fine residences. Delta has the reputation of being the best market place in the County.

The first election held in the eastern part, if not in the whole County, was held on the Williams farm, two miles east of Delta. It is said by Mr. Fewlas that he went to the election, but the Judges were out in the woods hunting bee trees, consequently he did not vote.

On a petition of sixty residents of Delta, the village was incorporated, August 3, 1863. At the election the following officers were elected: Mayor, William Critzer; Clerk, Chas. Cullen; Members of Council, D. H. Pettys, J. T. Gates, A. M. Carpenter, O. T. Clark, and Simon Zimmerman.

And according to the Delta Atlas from April 16, 1942, Dr. Allan White father of famed newspaper editor William Allen White built the first home in Delta.

Notable people

  • Nate Kmic played his high school football at Delta High School from 2001-2005 and Mt Union University and holds the following records.
  • Ohio High School Records OHSAA
  • OHSAA Football Points, Career (#9) 598, Nate Kmic, Delta (2001-2004)
  • OHSAA Football Points, Season (#6) 294, Nate Kmic, Delta (2004)
  • NCAA College Records
  • Football Points Season- 264 by Nate Kmic, 2008
  • Football Points Career- 780 by Nate Kmic, 2005-2008
  • NCAA All-Divisions Record Football TD Season- 44 by Nate Kmic, 2008
  • NCAA All-Divisions Record Football TD Career- 130 by Nate Kmic, 2005-2008
  • NCAA All-Divisions Record Football Yards Season- 2,790 by Nate Kmic, 2008
  • NCAA All-Divisions Record Football Yards Career- 8,074 by Nate Kmic, 2005-2008
  • Steve Buehrer served in the Ohio House of Representatives and the Ohio Senate.

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010".  
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  4. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  9. ^ http://www.pdy.k12.oh.us/
  10. ^ http://www.pdy.k12.oh.us/high-school
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