Desmethyl-diazepam

Nordazepam (marketed under brand names Nordaz, Stilny, Madar, Vegesan, and Calmday), also known as desoxydemoxepam, nordiazepam and desmethyldiazepam, is a 1,4-benzodiazepine derivative. Like other benzodiazepine derivatives, it has anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, muscle relaxant and sedative properties. However, it is used primarily in the treatment of anxiety. It is an active metabolite of diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, clorazepate, prazepam, pinazepam, and medazepam.[1]

Side effects

Common side effects of nordazepam include somnolence, which is more common in elderly patients and/or people on high dose regimens. Hypotonia, which is much less common, is also associated with high doses and/or old age.

Contraindications and special caution

Benzodiazepines require special precaution if used in the elderly, during pregnancy, in children, alcohol- or drug-dependent individuals and individuals with comorbid psychiatric disorders.[2]

Pharmacology

Nordazepam is a partial agonist at the GABAA receptor, which makes it less potent than other benzodiazepines.[3] The elimination half life is between 36 and 200 hours.[4]

Abuse

Nordazepam and other sedative hypnotic drugs are detected frequently in cases of people suspected of driving under the influence of drugs. Many drivers have blood levels far exceeding the therapeutic dose range suggesting a high degree of abuse potential for benzodiazepines. [5]

See also

External links

  • Inchem - Nordazepam

References

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