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Don Stanhouse

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Don Stanhouse

Don Stanhouse
Pitcher
Born: (1951-02-12) February 12, 1951
Du Quoin, Illinois
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 19, 1972, for the Texas Rangers
Last MLB appearance
September 24, 1982, for the Baltimore Orioles
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 38–54
Earned run average 3.84
Strikeouts 408
Saves 64
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Donald Joseph Stanhouse (born February 12, 1951 in Du Quoin, Illinois) is a retired baseball pitcher who had a ten-year major league career from 1972 to 1980, 1982. He played for the Texas Rangers and Baltimore Orioles of the American League and the Montreal Expos and Los Angeles Dodgers of the National League.

Shuttled back and forth from the bullpen to the starting rotation with the Rangers and Expos, Stanhouse excelled in 1978 after joining the Baltimore Orioles, where Manager Earl Weaver employed him as a full-time closer. Because of his Harpo Marx hairstyle and pre-game batting practice antics - where his primal scream would entertain early ballpark arrivals - he was quickly labeled Stan the Man Unusual, a pun on the nickname "Stan the Man" for Hall-of-Famer Stan Musial.[1]

Stanhouse finished 3rd in the American League in both 1978 & 1979 in saves, recording 45 over that span, helping the Orioles capture the American League Championship in 1979. He was selected to the American League All-Star team in 1979.

Although an effective closer, Stanhouse had a reputation of walking batters he was not willing to face. Frequently his tactics would lead to dangerous situations in close games with multiple base-runners, and send the chain-smoking Weaver pacing back and forth in the dugout in agony. This resulted in Weaver nicknaming Stanhouse Fullpack, referring to the number of cigarettes consumed while watching him pitch. Weaver also was quoted in saying Stanhouse was an asshole, who ruined his health.[1]

Stanhouse left the Orioles as a free agent after the Orioles lost the 1979 World Series and signed a large guaranteed contract with the Los Angeles Dodgers. He was ineffective for the Dodgers in 1980, appearing in 21 games and posting an ERA over 5.00. The Dodgers sent him home during the season. He did not pitch at all in 1981, after which his contract expired and he was not re-signed by the Dodgers. Stanhouse retired after a brief comeback with the Orioles the following year.

After retirement, he became a business consultant for a venture capital firm. Married for 27 years, and a father of 3, he lives in Trophy Club, Texas.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c sports blog), Tuesday, August 18, 2009.The Baltimore Sun (The Toy DepartmentKlingaman, Mike. "Catching Up With...former Oriole Don Stanhouse,"

External links

  • Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube, or Baseball-Reference (Minors)
  • Baseball Gauge
  • Retrosheet
  • SABR Biography Project
  • Venezuelan Professional Baseball League
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