Dopamine receptor agonist

A dopamine agonist is a compound that activates dopamine receptors in the absence of dopamine. Dopamine agonists activate signaling pathways through the dopamine receptor and trimeric G-proteins, ultimately leading to changes in gene transcription.

Uses

Some medical drugs act as dopamine agonists and can treat hypodopaminergic (low dopamine) conditions; they are typically used for treating Parkinson's disease,Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (in the form of stimulants.) and certain pituitary tumors (prolactinoma), and may be useful for restless legs syndrome (RLS). Both Requip (Ropinirole) and Mirapex (Pramipexole) are FDA-approved for the treatment of RLS. There is also an ongoing clinical trial to test the effectiveness of the dopamine agonist Requip (ropinirole) in reversing the symptoms of SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction and Post-SSRI sexual dysfunction (PSSD).[1] Additionally, a systematic review and meta-analysis concluded that prophylactic treatment with cabergoline reduces the incidence, but not the severity, of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), without compromising pregnancy outcomes, in females undergoing stimulated cycles of in vitro fertilization (IVF).[2]

Side-effects

Some of the common side effects of dopamine agonists include:[3][4]

Examples

Examples of dopamine agonists include:

Partial agonist

Agonists of full/unknown efficacy

Some, such as fenoldopam, are selective for dopamine receptor D1.[7]

See also

References

6. Avanzi M, Uber E, Bonfa F. Pathological gambling in two patients on dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson’s disease. Neurol Sci 2004; 25:98–101[Medline]

External links

  • Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)
  • http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/01/22/2143502.htm
  • http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/19/4/473
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