World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Dorival Júnior

Dorival Júnior
Personal information
Full nameDorival Silvestre Júnior
Date of birth (1962-04-25) 25 April 1962 (age 52)
Place of birthAraraquara, Brazil
Height1.86 m (6 ft 1 in)
Playing positionMidfielder
Club information
Current clubVasco da Gama
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1982–1983Ferroviária19(0)
1984–1985Guarani3(0)
1985–1986Avaí0(0)
1986–1987Joinville25(0)
1988São José0(0)
1988Coritiba23(0)
1989–1992Palmeiras37(0)
1993Grêmio15(0)
1994–1995Juventude8(0)
1998Matonense0(0)
1999Botafogo-SP9(0)
Teams managed
2003–2004Figueirense
2005Fortaleza
2005Criciúma
2005Juventude
2005–2006Sport Recife
2006Avaí
2006–2007São Caetano
2007Cruzeiro
2008Coritiba
2009Vasco da Gama
2010Santos
2010–2011Atlético Mineiro
2011–2012Internacional
2012–2013Flamengo
2013–Vasco da Gama
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Dorival Silvestre Júnior, usually known as Dorival Júnior (born 25 April 1962 in Araraquara, Brazil) is a football manager and former midfielder. He is nephew of the former Brazilian player Dudu.[1]

Career

As a player he began his professional career in his hometown in 1982, playing for Ferroviária. Two years later he moved to Guarani, of Campinas. In 1985, he began playing in the state of Santa Catarina, first for Avaí and later on for Joinville. In 1988 he went back to the state of São Paulo, this time to play for São José, but during the same year he moved to Coritiba. In 1989 he went to Palmeiras, where he stayed until 1992. A year later in 1993 he was sold to Grêmio, and in the following year he continued to play in the state Rio Grande do Sul, but this time for Juventude, where he ended his career in 1995.[2]

Dorival Júnior started his managerial career in 2003 with Figueirense and won the Campeonato Catarinense in 2004. In 2005, he went to Fortaleza and won the 2005 Campeonato Cearense. He later went to Criciúma and Juventude, still in 2005. In 2006, he won the Campeonato Pernambucano with Sport Recife and also managed Avaí in the same year.

In 2007, Dorival Junior had a great campaign with São Caetano, and helped them to become runner-up in the 2007 edition of the Campeonato Paulista. In that campaign he eliminated big clubs such as: Corinthians and São Paulo. After winning against São Paulo in the semi-finals, São Caetano were runners-up in the Campeonato Paulista, losing in the finals to Santos. A day after the finals, Dorival Júnior left São Caetano and went to Cruzeiro.

After a promising campaign, in which Cruzeiro were second in the championship for most of the year, Cruzeiro slipped up in the last few rounds and barely qualified for the Copa Libertadores 2008, Dorival Júnior was fired. Although Cruzeiro managed to qualify for the Libertadores, Cruzeiro decided to fire Dorival Júnior for a manager more capable of leading the team to a good Libertadores campaign.

On 20 July 2012 he was fired as coach from Internacional. The former colorado player Fernandão assumed the function. In July 23, three days after his demission, Dorival assumed Flamengo.[3]

On March 16, 2013, in a disagreement of values for renovation of his contract with Flamengo, Júnior left the club. According Paulo Pelaipe, executive director of Rubro-Negro, the reasons of Júnior's dismissed were only economics, and not technicals.[4]

Career statistics

Manager

Nat Team From To Record
G W L D Win % GF GA +/-
Brazil Vasco da Gama 2009 2009 62 38 16 8 61.29 111 47 +64
Brazil Flamengo 2012 2013 37 15 12 10 33.33 ? ? ?
Total 99 53 28 18 54.22 111 47 +64
As of March 16, 2013

References

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.