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Earl of Dudley

Earl of Dudley, of Dudley Castle in the County of Stafford, is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, both times for members of the Ward family. This family descends from Sir Humble Ward, the son of a wealthy goldsmith and jeweller to King Charles I. He married Frances Dudley, 6th Baroness Dudley, daughter of Sir Ferdinando Dudley, eldest son of Edward Sutton, 5th Baron Dudley (see the Baron Dudley for earlier history of the Sutton family). Frances was given away in marriage by her grandfather Lord Dudley in order for him to be able to redeem the heavily mortgaged estates around Dudley, whose mineral resources were the foundation of the family's great wealth. In 1644 Frances's husband Sir Humble Ward was raised to the Peerage of England in his own right as Baron Ward, of Birmingham in the County of Warwick. In contrast to the barony of Dudley, which had been created by writ, this peerage was created by letter patent and with remainder to heirs male. Lady Dudley and Lord Ward were both succeeded by their son Edward, the seventh and second Baron respectively. He was styled Lord Dudley and Ward. He was succeeded by his grandson, the eighth and third Baron. He was the son of the Hon. William Ward. On Lord Dudley and Ward's early death the titles passed to his posthumous son, the ninth and fourth Baron. He died unmarried at an early age and was succeeded by his uncle, the tenth and fifth Baron.

On his death in 1740 the two baronies separated. The barony of Dudley, which could pass through female lines, was inherited by the late Baron's nephew Ferdinando Dudley Lea (see the Baron Dudley for later history of this title). He was succeeded in the barony of Ward, which could only pass through male lines, by his second cousin John Ward, who became the sixth Baron Ward. He was the grandson of the Hon. William Ward (d. 1714), second son of the first Baron. Lord Ward had earlier represented Newcastle under Lyme in the House of Commons. In 1763 he was created Viscount Dudley and Ward, of Dudley in the County of Worcester, in the Peerage of Great Britain. He was succeeded by his son from his first marriage, the second Viscount. He sat as Member of Parliament for Marlborough and for Worcestershire. He was childless and on his death the titles passed to his half-brother, the third Viscount. He was also Member of Parliament for Worcestershire. He was succeeded by his son, the fourth Viscount. He was a politician and served as Foreign Secretary from 1827 to 1828. In 1827 he was honoured when he was created Viscount Ednam, of Ednam in the County of Roxburgh, and Earl of Dudley, of Dudley Castle in the County of Stafford. Both titles were in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.

Lord Dudley was childless and on his death in 1833 the two viscountcies and earldom became extinct. He was succeeded in the barony of Ward by his second cousin Reverend William Humble Ward, the tenth Baron. He was the grandson of Reverend William Ward, younger brother of the first Viscount Dudley and Ward. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the eleventh Baron. In 1860 the viscountcy of Ednam and earldom of Dudley were revived when he was created Viscount Ednam, of Ednam in the County of Roxburgh, and Earl of Dudley, of Dudley Castle in the County of Stafford. Both titles are in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. On his death the titles passed to his eldest son, the second Earl. He was a Conservative politician and served as Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland from 1902 to 1905 during the Irish Reform Association's plan for devolution in Ireland, and as Governor-General of Australia from 1908 to 1911. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the third Earl of Dudley, who represented Hornsey and Wednesbury in the House of Commons as a Conservative. The Third Earl died in Paris on 26 December 1969[1] and was succeeded by his eldest son, the fourth Earl, who held the titles until his death on 16 November 2013, when was succeeded by his son, the fifth Earl.

Several other members of the Ward family have also gained distinction. Viscount Ward of Witley in 1960. The actress Rachel Ward and her sister the environmental campaigner Tracy Louise Ward are both daughters of the Hon. Peter Alistair Ward, third son of the third Earl.

Contents

  • Barons Ward (1644) of Birmingham 1
  • Viscounts Dudley and Ward (1763) 2
  • Earls of Dudley, First Creation (1827) 3
  • Barons Ward (1644; Reverted) 4
  • Earls of Dudley, Second Creation (1860) 5
  • See also 6
  • Notes 7
  • References 8
  • Further reading 9
  • See also 10

Barons Ward (1644) of Birmingham

Viscounts Dudley and Ward (1763)

Earls of Dudley, First Creation (1827)

Barons Ward (1644; Reverted)

Earls of Dudley, Second Creation (1860)

The heir presumptive is the present holder's half-brother Hon. Leander Grenville Dudley Ward (b. 1971).

See also

Notes

References

  1. ^ Raybould, T. J. "Lord Dudley and the Making of the Black Country". The Blackcountryman 3 (2). Retrieved 12 March 2013. 

Further reading

  • Grazebrooke, H. S. 'The Barons of Dudley' Staffs. Hist. Coll. IX(2).
  • Kidd, Charles, Williamson, David (editors). Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage (1990 edition). New York: St Martin's Press, 1990,
  • Hemingway, John. 'An Illustrated Chronicle of the Castle and Barony of Dudley 1070-1757' (2006) The Friends of Dudley Castle. ISBN 978.0.9553438.0.3
  • Leigh Rayment's Peerage Pages
  • Lundy, Darryl. "FAQ". The Peerage. 
  • Order for the Succession of the Earls of Dudley, Edward Ward, Frances Ward, John Levet Esq., Journal of the House of Lords, 1699, British History Online

See also

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