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Ed Lynch (baseball)

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Ed Lynch (baseball)

Ed Lynch
Currently a scout with the Blue Jays
Pitcher
Born: (1956-02-25) February 25, 1956
Brooklyn, New York
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 31, 1980 for the New York Mets
Last MLB appearance
October 1, 1987 for the Chicago Cubs
Career statistics
Win–loss record 47–54
Earned run average 4.00
Strikeouts 396
Teams

Edward Francis Lynch (born February 25, 1956 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. He pitched and batted right-handed, and his pitch selection included a fastball, slider, changeup and slurve.[1]

Contents

  • MLB career 1
  • As an executive 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

MLB career

Lynch was drafted by the Mike Jorgensen.

Lynch debuted with the Mets on August 31, 1980 against the San Francisco Giants, and gave up four earned runs in just 1.1 inning out of the bullpen.[2] He won his first major league start on September 13 against the Chicago Cubs, snapping a thirteen-game losing streak for his club.[3] For the season, Lynch was 1–1 with a 5.12 ERA in four starts.

The Mets and Cubs were perennially the bottom two teams in the National League East for the early part of Lynch's career, however, they'd evolved into division rivals at the top of the N.L. East by the time Lynch took the mound in the second game of a double header on August 7, 1984. The first game was won by the Cubs, 8–6, on the strength of a six run fifth inning, which included a three run home run by Keith Moreland.[4] During a five run fourth inning in the second game, Lynch hit Moreland with a pitch, inciting a bench clearing brawl. The Cubs won the second game, 8–4.[5]

Lynch enjoyed a career year in 1985, when he went 10–8 with a 3.44 ERA in a career high 191 innings pitched. Lynch made only one appearance for the Mets in 1986, pitching 1.2 innings in relief in the third game of the season, when he went on the disabled list with torn cartilage in his left knee. By the time he was ready to return, he'd lost his spot in the starting rotation to the young pitchers on the 1986 World Champion squad. The Mets traded him to the Cubs for Dave Liddell and Dave Lenderman. He remained with the Cubs through 1987 before retiring.

As an executive

After his career ended, he attended the University of Miami School of Law, and graduated in 1991. Using his law degree and prior baseball experience he was able to land management positions with the San Diego Padres and Cubs, where he eventually became General Manager. Lynch was a popular person at UM, and was known to let other students try on his 1986 World Series ring, which he proudly wore every day. Ed currently resides in Phoenix, Arizona. At one point he worked as a scout for the Cubs. As of 2010, Lynch is serving as a professional scout in the Toronto Blue Jays organization.

References

  1. ^ The Neyer/James Guide to Pitchers: An Historical Compendium of Pitching, Pitchers, and Pitches. Bill James and Rob Neyer. 2004.
  2. ^ "San Francisco Giants 11, New York Mets 4". Baseball-reference.com. 1980-08-31. 
  3. ^ "New York Mets 4, Chicago Cubs 2". Baseball-reference.com. 1980-09-13. 
  4. ^ "Chicago Cubs 8, New York Mets 6". Baseball-reference.com. 1984-08-07. 
  5. ^ "Chicago Cubs 8, New York Mets 4". Baseball-reference.com. 1984-08-07. 

External links

  • Career statistics and player information from MLB, or ESPN, or Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube, or Baseball Almanac, or Ultimate Mets Database
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Larry Himes
Chicago Cubs General Manager
1994–2000
Succeeded by
Andy MacPhail
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