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Elections in the Philippines

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Elections in the Philippines

Voter turnout during national elections from 1946 onwards.
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
the Philippines

The elections in the Philippines have several types. The president, vice-president, and the senators are elected for a six-year term, while the members of the House of Representatives, governors, vice-governors, members of the Sangguniang Panlalawigan (provincial board members), mayors, vice-mayors, members of the Sangguniang Panlungsod/members of the Sangguniang Bayan (city/municipal councilors), barangay officials, and the members of the Sangguniang Kabataan (youth councilors) are elected to serve for a three-year term.

The Congress or Kongreso has two chambers. The House of Representatives or Kapulungan ng mga Kinatawan has 292 seats as of 2013, of which 80% are contested in single seat electoral districts and 20% are allotted to party-lists according to a modified Hare quota with remainders disregarded and a three-seat cap, which are only accessible to marginalized and under-represented groups and parties, local parties, and sectoral wings of major parties that represent the marginalized. The Constitution of the Philippines allows the House of Representatives to have more than 250 members by statute without a need for a constitutional amendment. The Senate or Senado has 24 members which are elected on a nationwide at-large basis; they do not represent any geographical district. Half of the Senate is renewed every three years.

The Philippines has a multi-party system, with numerous parties in which no one party often has a chance of gaining power alone, and parties must work with each other to form a coalition government. The Commission on Elections (COMELEC) is responsible for running the elections.

Under the Constitution, elections for the members of Congress and local positions (except barangay officials) occur every second Monday of May every third year after May 1992, and presidential and vice presidential elections occur every second Monday of May every sixth year after May 1992. All elected officials, except those at the barangay level, start (and end) their terms of office on June 30 of the election year.

Contents

  • Voting 1
    • Qualification 1.1
    • Absentee voters 1.2
    • Process 1.3
  • Schedule 2
    • Election 2.1
      • Fixed-term elections 2.1.1
    • Inauguration 2.2
  • Elected offices 3
    • President and vice president 3.1
    • Congress 3.2
      • Senators 3.2.1
      • House of Representatives 3.2.2
    • Local positions 3.3
  • Other elections 4
    • Referendums and plebiscites 4.1
    • Recall 4.2
    • Initiatives 4.3
    • Special election 4.4
    • Primary elections 4.5
  • History 5
    • List of elections 5.1
  • Latest elections 6
    • 2010 presidential election 6.1
    • 2010 vice presidential election 6.2
    • 2013 legislative election 6.3
      • 2013 Senate election 6.3.1
      • 2013 House of Representatives elections 6.3.2
    • 2013 Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao general election 6.4
    • 2013 gubernatorial elections 6.5
    • 2013 local elections 6.6
    • 2013 barangay elections 6.7
  • See also 7
  • References 8
  • External links 9

Voting

Qualification

Every citizen 18 years old or above on Election Day, is a resident of the Philippines for at least a year and for at least six months on the place he is registering, and is not otherwise disqualified by law, may vote. In order to actually vote, a citizen has to register. The COMELEC has a registration period for several months prior to the election. Those who are not registered will not appear on the voters' list and is ineligible to vote despite being qualified to do so.

People aged 15 to 18 may vote in Sangguniang Kabataan elections. Same with their adult counterparts, the COMELEC has a registration period a few months prior to the election.

Absentee voters

Absentee voters are divided into two types: the local absentee voters and the overseas absentee voters. Local absentee voters include people who are working during Election Day. These include soldiers, policemen, government employees and the like. Overseas absentee voters refer to Filipinos residing abroad. They are eligible to vote on national positions only (president, vice-president, senators and party-list representatives). Overseas absentee voters may vote in Philippine embassies and consulates, and voting begins as early as a 4 months prior to the election. The voting can be as long as 6 months in very few situations.

Process

Once a registered voter finds his/her name in the voters' list and locates the correct precinct, he may queue in line for the distribution of the ballot.

Prior to the 2010 elections, voters have to write the names of the candidates next to the positions in which they are running. COMELEC-approved nicknames maybe used by the voters in writing the names. After the polling period ends, the Board of Election Inspectors (or the teachers manning the polling precinct) counts the ballots by hand. Once all the ballots are counted, the election returns will now be sent to the city or municipal Board of Canvassers, political parties and other groups.

However, since the 2010 elections, the voters now have to shade the oval that was indicated before the candidate's name, and a voting machine automatically counts each ballot as it is fed into it. The results will then be printed as the election return and sent electronically to the city or municipal Board of Canvassers as stated below.

The city or municipal Board of Canvassers canvasses the votes from all polling precincts within their jurisdiction and prepares two documents: a Statement of Votes (SOV) in which all votes from all candidates in all positions per precinct is listed; and a Certificate of Canvass (COC), a document showing the vote totals of all candidates within the Board of Canvassers' jurisdiction.

If the city or municipal Board of Canvassers' jurisdiction is an independent city with its own congressional district, they will send their SOV and COC to the national Board of Canvassers (the COMELEC for senate and party-list elections, Congress for presidential and vice presidential elections). If it is otherwise, they will send their SOV and COC to the provincial Board of Canvassers where the votes as stated from the city or municipal COC will be canvassed. The provincial Board of Canvassers sends their SOV and COC to the national Board of Canvassers once canvassing is done. The national Board of Canvassers then canvasses all COCs and declares the winners for national positions.

Schedule

Election

Fixed-term elections

National and local elections are held on the second Monday of May every third year starting 1992. The presidential and vice presidential elections are held every six years. Election Days in which the president and vice president and barangay officials are not elected are called "midterm elections"; Election Days in which the president and vice president are elected are called "presidential elections." Barangay-level officials, although are currently elected in the same year as the other officials, are elected separately the succeeding months (see below).

From 1949 to 1971, election days are held every second Tuesday of November of every odd-numbered year with the presidential and vice presidential election held the every fourth year starting from 1951.

Barangay-level elections, starting from 2007, are to be held every three years during the last Monday of October, although these elections are frequently postponed (and incumbents' terms are extended) as a cost-saving measure. Elections for the positions in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM), starting from 2011, are to be held every three years during the second Monday of May.

Position 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Type Presidential (May)
Barangay (October)
None Midterm (May)
Barangay (October)
None Presidential (May)
Barangay (October)
President and
vice president
President and vice president None President and vice president
Senate Seats contested during even-numbered years (12 seats) None Seats contested during odd-numbered years (12 seats) None Seats contested during even-numbered years (12 seats)
House of Representatives All seats None All seats None All seats
ARMM None All positions None All positions
Provinces, cities and municipalities All positions None All positions None All positions
Barangays All positions None All positions except SK None SK All positions

Inauguration

Position 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Type Presidential (June)
Barangay (November)
None Midterm (June)
Barangay (November)
None Presidential (June)
Barangay (November)
President and
vice president
June 30 None June 30
Senate June 30 None June 30 None June 30
House June 30 None June 30 None June 30
ARMM None June 30 None
Provinces, cities and municipalities June 30 None June 30 None June 30
Barangays November 30 None November 30 None November 30

Elected offices

Position Number
President 1
Vice president 1
Senators 12
House of Representatives (district) 1
House of Representatives (party-list) 1
Governor 1*
Vice governor 1*
Board members 1 to 7*
Mayor 1
Vice mayor 1
Councilors 4 to 12
Total presidential 22 to 39
Total midterm 20 to 37
Regional governor 1
Regional vice governor 1
Regional assemblymen 3
Total ARMM 5
Barangay captain 1
Barangay councilor (kagawad) 7
Total barangay 8
SK chairman 1
SK councilor (kagawad) 7
Total SK 8
*Some cities do not elect provincial officials.

In a presidential election year, a voter may vote for as much as 34 names and a party-list organization. In ARMM elections, a voter may vote for five names, and in barangay elections, a voter may vote for eight names. A voter for the Sangguniang Kabataan (SK, youth council) may vote for eight names; currently, SK voters are aged 15 to 18 years old with only the SK voters aged 18 years old may vote for other barangay officials.

President and vice president

Each voter is entitled to one vote each for the duration of the election. The voter may split his or her ticket. The candidate with the most votes wins the position; there is no run-off election, and the president and vice president may come from different parties. If two or more candidates emerge with an equal and highest number of votes, one of them will be elected by the Senate and the House of Representatives, voting separately.

Congress

Senators

The Senate has 24 members, and 12 members are elected every election; hence, each voter is entitled to twelve votes for the Senate in every election. The voter may not complete the twelve votes for the Senate, but s/he must not surpass the twelve votes or else his/her ballot for that position will be nullified. With the entire country as one at-large district, the twelve candidates with the most number of votes are elected. This is often not proportional to the results.

From 1951 to 1971, instead of 12 senators elected every three years, the electorate voted for eight senators every two years in the same format. From 1941 to 1949, all elections to the senate were by block voting: the voters may write a name for every seat contested, or they can write the name of the party, which would then give all of the voters' votes to that party's ticket. Compounded with the Nacionalista Party's dominance, this caused a sweep of 24 seats for them in 1941.[1] From 1916 to 1934, voting was via senatorial districts; voters vote for one candidate every three years, except for the first election in 1916 where they'd vote for two candidates; the second-placed candidate would only serve for three years.

House of Representatives

Each voter has two votes in the House of Representatives.

A voter may elect a representative from the congressional district of residence. The candidate with the highest number of votes in a district wins that district's seat.

A voter may also elect a party-list organization. The voter votes for the party, not for the candidate, and the voter is restricted to one vote. All votes are tallied in an at-large basis, and parties with at least 2% of the vote wins at least one seat in the House. A further two more seats will be granted if there are still spare seats (the party-list representatives comprise 20% of the House), and if there are still unfilled seats, the parties with less than 2% of the vote will get one seat each in descending order until all seats are filled. A party-list organization is limited to represented marginalized sectors in the society such as the youth, laborers, women, and the like.

Previously, the calculation for the winners in the party-list election was different: the winning parties should have 2% of the national vote and are awarded one seat; any additional 2% is given an additional seat until the maximum of three seats per party is filled up. Since only several parties surpassed the 2% election threshold, the number of party-list representatives was always less than 20% of the House's membership.

The party-list system was first used in 1998; from 1987 to 1995, the president with the concurrence of the Commission on Appointments, appointed the sectoral representatives. Sectoral representatives were first elected during 1978.

Local positions

Synchronized with the national elections are the local elections. The voter may vote for any of the following:

If the city the voter is residing in a highly urbanized city or independent component city, the voter can not vote for any of the provincial-level positions.

The Sangguniang Panlalawigan (provincial board), Sangguniang Panlungsod (city council) and Sangguniang Bayan (municipal council)'s manner of election is identical with that of the Senate. In some cities and provinces, they are split into districts (not necessarily the same as the congressional district) in which separate board members/council members are elected.

Barangay elections are held every three years, although usually not in the same time as elections for other positions. Terms of incumbent barangay officials are often extended when Congress suspend the barangay elections as a cost-saving measure. The barangay-level positions are:

  • One barangay captain
  • Seven barangay kagawads (councilors)
  • One Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) chairperson (youth council chairperson)
  • Seven SK kagawads (councilors)

The manner of election of the Sangguniang Kabataan in the barangay is identical to the one used in the Senate. Each barangay is entitled to one SK. The barangay SK chairpersons in a city or municipality elect amongst themselves a president that will sit as an ex officio member of the city or municipal council. The city (if applicable) and municipal SK presidents then elect amongst themselves a president that will sit in the provincial board as an ex officio member. Finally, provincial and city (which are not under the jurisdiction of a province) chairpersons elect amongst themselves the SK national federation president that will sit as an ex officio member of the National Youth Commission.

The manner of representation of the different barangay chairmen in the municipal, city and provincial legislatures as ex officio members is identical with the way how the SK chairpersons are represented; the provincial and city (which are not under the jurisdiction of a province) chairpersons elect amongst themselves the president of the National League of the Barangays (Liga ng mga Barangay).

Other elections

Referendums and plebiscites

Referendums and plebiscites are conducted in order to pass certain laws. Any amendments or revision to the constitution, merging, creation and abolition of local government units and autonomous regions and the like are validated via plebiscites. In order for a referendum and plebiscite to pass, the votes in favor must be greater in number than those which are opposed; there is no requirement for how high the voter turnout should be in such referendums or plebiscites.

The terms "referendum" and "plebiscite" mean different things in the context of Philippine political discourse:

  • Referendum is the power of the electorate to approve or reject a legislation through an election called for the purpose.
  • Plebiscite is the electoral process by which an initiative on the Constitution is approved or rejected by the people.
    • It is also the term used in determining the creation of a barangay (village), municipalities, cities, provinces and autonomous regions.

In order to initiate a referendum, a total of 10% of all registered voters, plus 3% from every affected legislative district, must sign a petition. If the affected locality only has one legislative district, the 3% requirement falls to every municipality for a province-wide referendum, and for every barangay for city-wide referendum. For barangay-level referendums, the requirement is 10% of all registered voters. For a constitutional plebiscite, 12% of all registered voters is needed, with 3% for all legislative districts, and that it could be exercised five years after its ratification on February 2, 1987, and once every five years after each plebiscite. A referendum is passed if it is approved by a majority of the votes cast; a defeat means the law sought to be rejected or amended remains to be in full effect.

There had been two "waves" of national referendums in the Philippines: the first was during the Commonwealth period, and the latter was during the martial law period. Locally, the most common plebiscites are on creating new provinces and the upgrading of a municipality into a city.

The last provincial-level plebiscite was on 2013 for the creation of a new province of Davao Occidental that was passed; the last national plebiscite was in 1987 for the approval of the constitution endorsed by the 1986 Constitutional Commission.

Recall

Elected local government officials may be recalled. A recall election may be called if either a majority of all members of a preparatory recall assembly, composed of all elected local officials within a local government unit (LGU), endorse a recall, or if there is a petition of at least 25% of the registered voters in that LGU. The recalled official is not allowed to resign when facing a recall election, but may participate in it; the candidate with the highest number of votes wins the recall election.

The last recall election above the barangay level will be the 2015 Puerto Princesa mayoral recall election.

Initiatives

Initiatives (locally known as "people's initiative") to amend or revise the constitution, or propose new laws are allowed if there are is a petition of at least 12% of all registered voters in the country, with at least 3% in every legislative district. A plebiscite will be called it meets such requirements. A people's initiative has never made it past the stage verification of signatures.

Special election

The term "special election" in the Philippines may mean either of the following:

  • An election that was supposedly held with the general election but was delayed;
  • An election to elect a new official after the predecessor left office (known as "by-elections" elsewhere)

Members of the House of Representatives can be elected under the second type of special election whenever the predecessor leaves office, except when the next regularly scheduled election is less than a year away. A special election for president and vice president can only be called if both offices are vacant at the same time, and is outside the 18 months prior to the next regularly scheduled presidential election.

The last special election to elect a vacancy to the House of Representatives was 2012 for Negros Occidental's 5th legislative district. The last special election for the presidency was on 1986.

Primary elections

Primary elections do not exist in the Philippines. The leaders of the various political parties select the candidates themselves, and party membership is liquid. In some cases, if a politician is not chosen to be a candidate, he can join another party (such as Ferdinand Marcos, a Liberal, jumped ship to the Nacionalistas in 1965 when the Liberals picked incumbent Diosdado Macapagal as their presidential candidate), or create their own party (such as Fidel Ramos, when he created the Lakas ng Tao (now Lakas Kampi CMD) after the Laban ng Demokratikong Pilipino chose Ramon Mitra as their presidential candidate in 1992).

History

Beginning during the Spanish Colonial Period there were a few attempts nationally of electing local officials. Once the Spanish colonial government was replaced by the American colonial Insular Government. following the Spanish–American War, and the First Philippine Republic defeated in the Philippine–American War, there were multiple elections held throughout peaceful areas of the country for provincial and local officials.

During the First Philippine Republic an attempt was made to elect a national congress but the Republic did not control the Philippines and so no nationwide election could be held. The first fully national election for a fully elected legislative body was in 1907 for the Philippine Assembly, the elected half of the bicameral Philippine Legislature during the American Colonial Period.

List of elections

Only elections national in scope are included.

Year General President Upper house Lower house Local Barangay Other Referendum
1895 Municipal
1898 1898 Congress
1899 Local
1902 Local
1904 Local
1905 Local
1907 Philippine Assembly
1909 Philippine Assembly Local
1912 Philippine Assembly Local
1916 Legislative Senate House of Representatives Local
1919 Legislative Senate House of Representatives Local
1922 Legislative Senate House of Representatives Local
1925 Legislative Senate House of Representatives Local
1928 Legislative Senate House of Representatives Local
1931 Legislative Senate House of Representatives Local
1934 Legislative Senate House of Representatives Local Constitutional convention
1935 General President & vice president National Assembly Constitutional
1937 Local Women's suffrage
1938 National Assembly
1940 Constitutional
1941 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives Local
1943 National Assembly Local
1946 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives
1947 Senate Local Parity rights
1949 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives
1951 Senate Local
1953 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives
1955 Senate Local
1957 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives
1959 Senate Local
1961 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives
1963 Senate Local
1965 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives
1967 Senate Local
1969 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives
1970 Constitutional convention
1971 Senate Local
1973 Constitutional (January)
Martial law (July)
1975 Executive and legislative powers
1976 Constitutional
1977 Constitutional
1978 Parliament
1980 Local
1981 President Constitutional (April)
Barangay institutionalization (June)
1982 Barangay
1984 Parliament Constitutional
1986 President & vice president
1987 Legislative Senate House of Representatives Constitutional
1988 Local
1989 Barangay
1992 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives Local SK
1994 Barangay
1995 General Senate House of Representatives Local
1996 SK
1997 Barangay
1998 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives Local
2001 General Senate House of Representatives Local
2002 Barangay & SK
2004 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives Local
2007 General Senate House of Representatives Local Barangay & SK
2010 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives Local Barangay & SK
2013 General Senate House of Representatives Local Barangay
2016 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives Local Barangay & SK

Latest elections

The latest presidential and vice presidential elections were held in May 2010. The latest national and local elections are the May 2013 polls, followed in October by barangay elections.

2010 presidential election

 Summary of the May 10, 2010 Philippine presidential election results
Candidate Party Results
Votes %
Benigno Aquino III Liberal 15,208,678 42.08%
Joseph Estrada PMP 9,487,837 26.25%
Manny Villar Nacionalista 5,573,835 15.42%
Gilberto Teodoro Lakas-Kampi 4,095,839 11.33%
Eddie Villanueva Bangon Pilipinas 1,125,878 3.12%
Richard Gordon Bagumbayan-VNP 501,727 1.39%
Nicanor Perlas Independent 54,575 0.15%
Jamby Madrigal Independent 46,489 0.13%
John Carlos de los Reyes Ang Kapatiran 44,244 0.12%
Total valid votes 36,139,102 94.73%
Vetallano Acosta[p 1] KBL 181,985 0.48%
Total invalid votes 2,010,269 5.27%
Total turnout 38,149,371 74.34%
Registered voters 51,292,465 100.00%
  1. ^ Disqualified after the ballots were printed. All of his votes are considered spoiled

2010 vice presidential election

 Summary of the May 10, 2010 Philippine vice presidential election results
Candidate Party Results
Votes %
Jejomar Binay PDP-Laban[v 1] 14,645,574 41.65%
Mar Roxas Liberal 13,918,490 39.58%
Loren Legarda NPC[v 2] 4,294,664 12.21%
Bayani Fernando Bagumbayan-VNP 1,017,631 2.89%
Edu Manzano Lakas-Kampi 807,728 2.30%
Perfecto Yasay Bangon Pilipinas 364,652 1.04%
Jay Sonza KBL 64,230 0.18%
Dominador Chipeco, Jr. Ang Kapatiran 52,562 0.15%
Total valid votes 35,165,555 92.18%
Total invalid votes 2,983,816 7.82%
Total turnout 38,149,371 74.38%
Registered voters 51,292,555 100.00%
  1. ^ Binay is Joseph Estrada's (PMP) guest candidate for vice president.
  2. ^ Legarda is Manny Villar's (Nacionalista) guest candidate for vice president.

2013 legislative election

2013 Senate election

 Summary of the May 13, 2013 Philippine Senate election results per party
Party Popular vote Breakdown Seats
Total % Swing Entered Up Not up Gains Holds Losses Won End 15th 16th +/−
Start %
UNA (United Nationalist Alliance)[s 1] 80,257,922 26.97% 11.11% 8 1 2 1 2 0 3 3 5 21% 2
Nacionalista (Nationalist Party) 45,531,389 15.30% 1.40% 3 3 2 0 3 0 3 5 5 21%
Liberal (Liberal Party) 33,678,948 11.32% 15.02% 3 1 3 0 1 0 1 4 4 17%
NPC (Nationalist People's Coalition) 30,204,220 10.15% 5.63% 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 2 2 8%
LDP (Struggle of Democratic Filipinos) 16,005,564 5.38% 5.38% 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 4%
PDP-Laban (Philippine Democratic Party – People's Power) 14,725,114 4.95% 2.72% 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 4%
Akbayan (Akbayan Citizens' Action Party) 10,944,843 3.68% 3.68% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
Bangon Pilipinas (Rise Up, Philippines) 6,932,985 2.33% 0.15% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
Makabayan (Patriotic Coalition of the People) 4,295,151 1.44% 1.44% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
Ang Kapatiran (Alliance for the Common Good) 2,975,641 1.00% 0.16% 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
DPP (Democratic Party of the Philippines) 2,500,967 0.84% 0.84% 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
Social Justice Society 1,240,104 0.42% 0.42% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
Lakas-CMD (People Power-Christian Muslim Democrats) Not participating 1 2 0 0 0 0 3 2 8% 1
PRP (People's Reform Party) Not participating 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 4%
Independent 48,332,949 16.24% 8.16% 5 2 0 0 2 0 2 3 3 13%
Vacancy 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0% 1
Total votes 297,625,797 N/A 33 12 12 1 10 1 12 24 24 100%
Turnout 40,144,207 75.77% 1.43%
Registered voters 52,982,173 100% 3.24%
  1. ^ An electoral alliance of the Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan (PDP-Laban) and of the Pwersa ng Masang Pilipino (PMP), UNA has candidates from both parties, with all running under the UNA banner. However, one candidate is running under the PDP-Laban banner and is not included in these figures. Therefore, figures are as compared from the PMP's 2010 figures.

2013 House of Representatives elections

 Summary of the May 13, 2013 Philippine House of Representatives election results for representatives from congressional districts
Party/coalition Popular vote Breakdown Seats
Total % Swing Entered Up Gains Holds Losses Wins Elected %[hd 1] +/−[hd 2]
Liberal (Liberal Party) 10,557,265 38.31% 18.38% 160 93 22 84 9 4 109 37.7% 16
Bukidnon Paglaum (Hope for Bukidnon) 100,405 0.36% 0.36% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%
Kusug Agusanon (Progressive Agusan) 71,436 0.26% 0.26% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%
KKK (Struggle for Peace, Progress and Justice) 54,425 0.20% 0.16% 2 [hd 3] 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
Akbayan (Akbayan Citizens' Action Party) 34,239 0.12% 0.12% 2 0 1 0 0 1 1 0.0% 1
Liberal Party coalition 10,817,770 39.22% 19.77% 165 95 22 85 9 4 112 38.6% 17
UNA (United Nationalist Alliance) 3,140,381 9.31% 9.31% 55 11 3 5 6 0 8 2.7% 3
PDP-Laban (Philippine Democratic Party – People's Power) 281,320 1.02% 0.29% 13 [hd 4] 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
PMP (Force of the Filipino Masses) 144,030 0.52% 1.98% 11 [hd 5] 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
KABAKA (Partner of the Nation for Progress) 94,966 0.34% 0.14% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%
Magdiwang (Magdiwang Party) 23,253 0.08% 0.06% 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.3% 1
1-Cebu (One Cebu) 21,936 0.08% 0.08% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
United Nationalist Alliance coalition 3,705,886 11.36% 3.55% 82 12 3 7 6 0 10 3.4% 2
Kambilan (Shield and Fellowship of Kapampangans) 96,433 0.35% 0.35% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3% 1
Unang Sigaw (First Cry of Nueva Ecija–Party of Change) 94,952 0.35% 0.34% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3% 1
United Negros Alliance 91,467 0.34% 0.34% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%
Hugpong (Party of the People of the City) 65,324 0.24% 0.24% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
Sulong Zambales (Forward Zambales) 60,280 0.22% 0.22% 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0.0% 1
PPP (Party of Change for Palawan) 57,485 0.21% 0.21% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3% 1
BALANE (New Force of Nueva Ecija Party) 39,372 0.14% 0.14% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
Tingog Leytenon (Positive Leyte) 34,025 0.12% 0.13% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
AZAP (Forward Zamboanga Party) 15,881 0.06% 0.06% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
Ompia (Ompia Party) 1,682 0.01% 0.01% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
Unaffiliated local parties 556,901 2.02% 1.84% 10 2 3 1 1 0 4 1.4% 2
NPC (Nationalist People's Coalition) 4,800,907 17.36% 1.40% 71 40 4 34 6 4 42 14.4% 2
NUP (National Unity Party) 2,402,097 8.69% 8.69% 34 30 0 24 6 0 24 8.2% 6
Nacionalista (Nationalist Party) 2,364,400 8.55% 2.79% 44 20 5 13 7 0 18 6.2% 2
Lakas (People Power-Christian Muslim Democrats) 1,472,464 5.33% 32.09% 24 18 0 13 5 1 14 4.8% 4
Aksyon (Democratic Action) 97,982 0.35% 0.09% 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
KBL (New Society Movement) 94,484 0.34% 0.12% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%
LDP (Struggle of the Democratic Filipinos) 90,070 0.33% 0.15% 4 1 1 1 0 0 2 0.7% 1
CDP (Centrist Democratic Party of the Philippines) 68,281 0.25% 0.25% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%
Ang Kapatiran (Aliance for the Common Good) 19,019 0.07% 0.06% 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
PMM (Workers' and Farmers' Party) 10,396 0.04% 2.59% 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
PLM (Party of the Laboring Masses) 10,196 0.04% 0.04% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
Makabayan (Patriotic Coalition of the People) 3,870 0.01% 0.01% 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
DPP (Democratic Party of the Philippines) 1,071 0.00% 0.00% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
Independent 1,665,324 6.02% 0.93% 172 4 4 1 3 1 6 2.1% 2
Vacancy 5 0 0 5 0 0.0% 5
Total 27,584,741 100% N/A 628 229 44 180 44 10 234 80.1% 5
Valid votes 27,584,741 About 8.3 million votes are not included as they weren't included in the Transparency server. It is unknown which of those are valid or invalid votes.
Invalid votes 4,148,957
Turnout 40,144,207 75.77% 1.43
Registered voters (without overseas voters) 52,014,648 100% 2.54%
  1. ^ Of all 292 House members, including party-list representatives.
  2. ^ From last composition of the 15th Congress.
  3. ^ All incumbent KKK representatives are co-nominated by the Liberal Party.
  4. ^ All incumbent PDP-Laban representatives are running under the United Nationalist Alliance.
  5. ^ All incumbent PMP representatives are running under the United Nationalist Alliance.
 Summary of the May 13, 2013 Philippine House of Representatives election results for party-list representatives[2]
Party Popular vote Seats
Total % Swing Up Won +/−
Buhay 1,270,608 4.60% 0.33% 2 3 1
A TEACHER 1,042,863 3.77% 1.66% 2 2
Bayan Muna 954,724 3.46% 0.90% 2 2
1-CARE 934,915 3.38% 0.75% 2 2
Akbayan 829,149 3.00% 0.62% 2 2
Abono 768,265 2.78% 0.16% 2 2
AKB 763,316 2.76% 2.44% 3 2 1
OFW Family 752,229 2.72% 2.72% 0 2 2
GABRIELA 715,250 2.59% 0.84% 2 2
Senior Citizens 679,168 2.46% 1.96% 1[p 1] 2 1
Coop-NATCCO 642,005 2.32% 0.90% 2 2
AGAP 592,463 2.14% 0.38% 1 2 1
CIBAC 584,906 2.12% 0.11% 2 2
Magdalo 567,426 2.05% 2.05% 0 2 2
An Waray 541,205 1.96% 0.47% 2 2
ABAMIN 466,114 1.69% 0.40% 1 1
ACT Teachers 454,346 1.64% 0.37% 1 1
Butil 439,557 1.59% 0.14% 1 1
AMIN 382,267 1.38% 0.83% 0 1 1
ACT-CIS 377,165 1.37% 1.37% 0 1 1
Kalinga 372,383 1.35% 0.56% 1 1
LPGMA 370,897 1.34% 0.09% 1 1
TUCP 369,286 1.34% 0.50% 1 1
YACAP 366,621 1.33% 0.18% 1 1
AGRI 366,170 1.33% 1.16% 0 1 1
ANGKLA 360,497 1.30% 1.30% 0 1 1
ABS 359,587 1.30% 0.42% 1 1
DIWA 341,820 1.24% 0.42% 1 1
Kabataan 341,292 1.24% 0.19% 1 1
Anakpawis 321,745 1.16% 0.37% 1 1
Alay Buhay 317,355 1.15% 0.59% 1 1
AAMBIS-Owa 312,312 1.13% 0.09% 1 1
1-SAGIP 287,739 1.04% 1.04% 0 1 1
AVE 270,431 0.98% 0.24% 1 1
ATING Koop 267,763 0.97% 0.37% 1 1
Abang Lingkod 260,923 0.94% 0.83% 0 1 1
1-BAP 245,529 0.89% 0.89% 0 1 1
ABAKADA 244,754 0.89% 0.56% 0 1 1
AMA 244,026 0.88% 0.67% 0 1 1
Ang Nars 243,360 0.88% 0.88% 0 1 1
ANAC-IP 241,505 0.87% 0.87% 0 1 1
Agbiag! 240,841 0.87% 0.03% 1 1
Append 236,353 0.86% 0.86% 0 1 1
ALIF 223,857 0.81% 0.03% 1 0 1
Ating Guro 214,080 0.77% 0.77% 0 0
PBA 212,298 0.77% 0.11% 1 0 1
Aangat Tayo 207,855 0.75% 0.14% 1 0 1
Ang Kasangga 202,456 0.73% 0.28% 1 0 1
BH 190,001 0.69% 0.31% 1 0 1
KAKUSA 175,096 0.63% 0.17% 1 0 1
PISTON 174,976 0.63% 0.63% 0 0
Bayani 165,906 0.60% 0.34% 0 0
AKMA-PTM 165,784 0.60% 0.04% 0 0
ADA 164,702 0.60% 0.50% 0 0
1-AALALAY 162,552 0.59% 0.59% 0 0
Abante Retirees 161,915 0.59% 0.59% 0 0
Katribu 153,844 0.56% 0.17% 0 0
ALE 153,616 0.56% 0.56% 0 0
1JAMG 153,072 0.55% 0.25% 0 0
ABROAD 150,854 0.55% 0.03% 1 0 1
VFP 148,591 0.54% 0.01% 0 0
APEC 146,392 0.53% 0.54% 1 0 1
Pasang Masda 134,944 0.49% 0.37% 0 0
1 ang Pamilya 131,954 0.48% 0.26% 1 0 1
AGHAM 130,694 0.47% 0.36% 1 0 1
Ang Prolife 129,989 0.47% 0.47% 0 0
PACYAW 123,791 0.45% 0.04% 0 0
1-UTAK 123,489 0.45% 0.30% 1 0 1
1-LAMBAT 119,505 0.43% 0.43% 0 0
1-PABAHAY 117,516 0.43% 0.43% 0 0
Akap Bata 116,837 0.42% 0.05% 0 0
Abante KA 111,625 0.40% 0.31% 0 0
FIRM 24-K 103,316 0.37% 0.04% 0 0
ABA 102,021 0.37% 0.10% 0 0
Ang Ladlad 100,958 0.37% 0.02% 0 0
AANI 93,581 0.34% 0.14% 0 0
AA-KASOSYO 88,603 0.32% 0.27% 1 0 1
1BRO-PGBI 87,247 0.32% 0.32% 0 0
PWD 86,854 0.31% 0.31% 0 0
Sanlakas 86,145 0.31% 0.31% 0 0
ATM 81,378 0.29% 0.20% 0 0
AKO 80,398 0.29% 0.02% 0 0
ADAM 77,206 0.28% 0.06% 0 0
ARAL 76,838 0.28% 0.14% 0 0
KAAKBAY 71,534 0.26% 0.29% 0 0
ANG MINERO 67,807 0.25% 0.12% 0 0
ALIM 65,119 0.24% 0.06% 0 0
AASENSO 65,095 0.24% 0.24% 0 0
1-AAMOVER 59,844 0.22% 0.22% 0 0
AMA 58,886 0.21% 0.21% 0 0
1GANAP/Guardians 58,406 0.21% 0.20% 0 0
AKO BAHAY 51,806 0.19% 0.01% 0 0
Migrante 51,431 0.19% 0.19% 0 0
Alyansa ng OFW 51,069 0.18% 0.13% 0 0
UMALAB KA 45,492 0.16% 0.16% 0 0
ARC 45,120 0.16% 0.04% 0 0
ABP 44,324 0.16% 0.03% 0 0
A BLESSED 43,829 0.16% 0.05% 0 0
AAMA 42,853 0.16% 0.01% 0 0
ADING 42,819 0.15% 0.15% 0 0
ARARO 41,257 0.15% 0.35% 0 0
UNI-MAD 41,023 0.15% 0.05% 0 0
AMOR Seaman 40,955 0.15% 0.15% 0 0
MTM PHILS 40,218 0.15% 0.15% 0 0
AWAT Mindanao 39,206 0.14% 0.01% 0 0
Green Force 30,581 0.11% 0.04% 0 0
Agila 29,739 0.11% 0.25% 0 0
AMS 27,883 0.10% 0.04% 0 0
Alagad 27,400 0.10% 0.68% 1 0 1
AFPSEGCO 24,369 0.09% 0.04% 0 0
KLBP 21,900 0.08% 0.09% 0 0
1-ABILIDAD 19,381 0.07% 0.07% 0 0
ALLUMAD 7,642 0.03% 0.01% 0 0
Vacancy 1[p 1] 1
Valid votes 27,630,854 68.83% 8.00% 57 58* 1
ANAD 201,050 1 0 1
BINHI 185,987 0 0
BANTAY 113,989 0 0
COCOFED 103,626 0 0
Atong Paglaum 95,490 0 0
1ST KABAGIS 94,651 0 0
SMART 84,803 0 0
KAP 57,152 0 0
A-IPRA 28,263 0 0
AG 4,259 1 0 1
Invalid and blank votes 12,513,353 31.17% 8.00%
Total turnout 40,144,207 77.19% 2.85%
Registered voters 52,006,910 100% 1.33%

*2 seats still to be decided; while the Senior Citizens party-list has been approved its registration, its nominees had not yet been proclaimed due to an ongoing dispute on two sets of nominees.

  1. ^ a b Senior Citizens originally had two representatives. When one of the Senior Citizens representatives resigned, the Commission on Elections refused to elevate the next person on the list as an elected representative after it was revealed to be a part of a term-sharing agreement which the commission prohibited.

2013 Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao general election

2013 gubernatorial elections

2013 local elections

2013 barangay elections

See also

References

  1. ^  
  2. ^ "List of Candidates With Votes Obtained for Partylist". COMELEC.gov.ph. 2015-06-01. Retrieved 2015-06-20. 

External links

  • Official website of the Commission on Elections

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