Eleventh Amendment of the Constitution of South Africa

Constitution Eleventh Amendment Act of 2003
Act to amend the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, so as to provide for Bills regulating certain financial matters to be dealt with in terms of section 76 (1) of the Constitution; to change the name of the Northern Province to Limpopo; to further regulate provincial intervention in local government; and to further regulate the process of review by the National Council of Provinces where there has been national executive intervention in provincial government and provincial executive intervention in local government; and to provide for matters connected therewith.
Enacted by Parliament of South Africa
Date enacted 25 March 2003
Date assented to 9 April 2003
Date commenced 11 July 2003
Legislative history
Bill Constitution of the Republic of South Africa Third Amendment Bill
Bill citation B33B—2002
Bill published on 14 August 2002
Introduced by Penuel Maduna, Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development
Amendments
Short title amended by the Citation of Constitutional Laws Act, 2005

The Eleventh Amendment of the Constitution of South Africa renamed the Northern Province to Limpopo, altered the procedure for intervention by the national government in a failing provincial government and intervention by a provincial government in a failing municipality, and expanded the powers of the provincial executive when it intervenes in a municipality.

The bill was passed by the National Assembly on 25 February 2003 with 305 votes in favour, more than the required two-thirds majority,[1] and by the National Council of Provinces on 25 March with all nine provinces in favour.[2] It was signed by President Thabo Mbeki on 9 April, and came into force on 11 July.

Formal title

The official short title of the amendment is "Constitution Eleventh Amendment Act of 2003". It was originally titled "Constitution of the Republic of South Africa Second Amendment Act, 2003" and numbered as Act No. 3 of 2003, but the Citation of Constitutional Laws Act, 2005 renamed it and abolished the practice of giving Act numbers to constitutional amendments.

References

  1. ^ http://www.parliament.gov.za/live/commonrepository/Processed/20091112/104665_1.doc . Parliamentary Debates (Hansard). Republic of South Africa: National Assembly. 25 February 2003. p. 174. 
  2. ^ http://www.parliament.gov.za/live/commonrepository/Processed/20091112/90722_1.doc . Parliamentary Debates (Hansard). Republic of South Africa: National Council of Provinces. 25 March 2003. p. 51. 

External links

  • Official text (PDF)
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