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Erythema

Erythema
Characteristic "bull's eye" rash (erythema migrans) of early Lyme disease
Classification and external resources
Specialty Dermatology
ICD-10 L51-L54
ICD-9-CM 695
ICD-O l
DiseasesDB 4466
MeSH D004890

Erythema (from the Greek erythros, meaning red) is redness of the skin or mucous membranes, caused by hyperemia of superficial capillaries.[1] It occurs with any skin injury, infection, or inflammation. Examples of erythema not associated with pathology include nervous blushes.[2]

Contents

  • Causes 1
  • Diagnosis 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Causes

It can be caused by infection, massage, electrical treatment, acne medication, allergies, exercise, solar radiation (sunburn), cutaneous radiation syndrome, mercury toxicity, blister agents,[3] niacin administration,[4] or waxing and tweezing of the hairs—any of which can cause the capillaries to dilate, resulting in redness. Erythema is a common side effect of radiotherapy treatment due to patient exposure to ionizing radiation.

Diagnosis

Erythema disappears on finger pressure (blanching), while purpura or bleeding in the skin and pigmentation do not. There is no temperature elevation, unless it is associated with the dilation of arteries in the deeper layer of the skin.

See also

References

  1. ^ Mosby's Medical Dictionary (9th ed.). St. Louis, Missouri: Elsevier. 2013.  
  2. ^ erythema, Mosby's Medical, Nursing & Allied Health Dictionary, Fourth Edition, Mosby-Year Book 1994, p. 570
  3. ^ https://fas.org/nuke/guide/usa/doctrine/army/mmcch/Vesicant.htm#CLINICAL EFFECTS
  4. ^ Weterle R, Rybakowski J (Mar–Apr 1990). "Test niacynowy w schizofrenii" [The niacin test in schizophrenia]. Psychiatr Pol. 24 (2): 116–20.  

External links

  • UM
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