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Esparto

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Title: Esparto  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Shoe, Rolling paper, Stipa tenacissima, Atocha, Halfa
Collection: Fiber Plants, Poaceae
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Esparto

Esparto, halfah grass, or esparto grass, is a fiber produced from two species of perennial grasses of north Africa and the southern part of Europe. It is used for crafts, such as cords, basketry, and espadrilles. Stipa tenacissima and Lygeum spartum are the species used to produce esparto.

Esparto paper

Esparto grass is known for its use in papermaking. The fiber makes a high quality paper often used in book manufacturing. First used in Great Britain in 1850, it has been extensively used there and in Europe, but due to transportation costs, it is rarely found in the United States. Most paper made from esparto is usually combined with five to ten percent wood pulp.

The "Spanish" grade is usually regarded as the higher-quality, while the "Tripoli" grade, from Africa, is the lesser in quality. The fibers are fairly short in relation to their width, yet do not create any significant amount of dust. Because of the short fiber length, the tensile strength of the paper is less than that of many other papers, but its resistance to shrinkage and stretching is superior, and the paper is a well-filled, dense paper with excellent inking qualities. It also has very good folding properties.

Some manufacturers of rolling paper may use esparto, which might lead to a slightly higher carcinogen level when burned. [2].

Gallery

External links

  • Esparto as a material (dead link)
  • Esparto Museum (Spanish)
  • Esparto fine craftsmanship (Spanish)
  • European influence and tribal society in Tunisia during the nineteenth century: the origins and impact of the trade in esparto grass 1870-1940. (1995) by Gavin McQuarrie, University of Durham, England
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