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Etilamfetamine

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Title: Etilamfetamine  
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Subject: Fenbutrazate, Amfecloral, Etolorex, Benfluorex, Aminorex
Collection: Amphetamines, Anorectics, Norepinephrine-Dopamine Releasing Agents, Substituted Amphetamines
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Etilamfetamine

Etilamfetamine
Systematic (IUPAC) name
N-ethyl-1-phenyl-propan-2-amine
Clinical data
Legal status
  • Schedule 1
Routes Oral, Sublingual, Insufflated (Snorted), Inhaled (Vaporized), Intravenous, Rectal
Pharmacokinetic data
Metabolism Hepatic
Excretion Renal
Identifiers
CAS number  YesY
ATC code A08
PubChem
ChemSpider  YesY
KEGG  YesY
ChEMBL  YesY
Chemical data
Formula C11H17N 
Mol. mass 163.259 g/mol
 YesY   

Ethylamphetamine (Apetinil, Adiparthrol), also known as etilamfetamine (INN) or N-ethylamphetamine, is a stimulant drug of the phenethylamine and amphetamine chemical classes. It was invented in the early 20th century and was subsequently used as an anorectic or appetite suppressant in the 1950s,[1] but was not as commonly used as other amphetamines such as amphetamine, methamphetamine, and benzphetamine, and was largely discontinued once newer drugs such as phenmetrazine were introduced.

Contents

  • Chemistry 1
  • Recreational use 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • Notes 5

Chemistry

The molecular structure of ethylamphetamine is analogous to amphetamine's.[Note 1] It is a substituted amphetamine, with an ethyl group on the amphetamine backbone.[Note 2][Note 3]

Recreational use

Ethylamphetamine can be used as a recreational drug and, while its prevalence is less than amphetamine's, it is still encountered as a substance taken for recreational purposes.

Ethylamphetamine produces effects similar to amphetamine and methamphetamine, its potency being slightly greater than amphetamine's and lesser than methamphetamine's.[Note 4][Note 5]

See also

References

  1. ^ Junet, R. (1956). "Ethylamphetamine in the treatment of obesity". Praxis 45 (43): 986–988.  

Notes

  1. ^ Amphetamine is a substituted phenethylamine with a methyl group at RA position.
  2. ^ The ethyl group of ethylamphetamine is at RN position, hence the name N-ethylamphetamine.
  3. ^ Ethylamphetamine is structurally similar to N-methylamphetamine (methamphetamine), the ethyl group being replaced in methamphetamine with a methyl group.
  4. ^ Ethylamphetamine's higher potency may make its risk of causing abuse, dependence and/or addiction greater compared to amphetamine.
  5. ^ A cohort of Australian users in the 1990s found single 40 mg doses of commercially produced racemic ethylamphetamine hydrochloride substantially less effective recreationally than 40 mg doses of either racemic amphetamine sulphate, d-methylamphetamine hydrochloride or racemic fenethylline hydrochloride.
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