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EuroBrun

EuroBrun
Full name EuroBrun Racing
Base Senago, Milan, Italy
Noted staff Walter Brun
Giampaolo Pavanello
Noted drivers Stefano Modena
Oscar Larrauri
Roberto Moreno
Gregor Foitek
Formula One World Championship career
First entry 1988 Brazilian Grand Prix
Races entered 46 (21 starts)
Engines Ford
Judd
Constructors'
Championships
0
Drivers'
Championships
0
Race victories 0 (best finish: 11th, 1988 Hungarian Grand Prix)
Pole positions 0 (best grid position: 15th, 1988 Canadian Grand Prix)
Fastest laps 0
Final entry 1990 Spanish Grand Prix

EuroBrun Racing was an Italo-Swiss Formula One constructor based in Senago, Milan, Italy. They participated in 46 grands prix, entering a total of 76 cars.

The team was a combination of two outfits - the mechanical manpower and skill of Giampaolo Pavanello's Euroracing team, who had also run the factory-backed slot machine magnate Walter Brun, who ran the Brun Motorsport sports car team.

Oscar Larrauri driving for EuroBrun at the 1988 Canadian Grand Prix.

For the team's debut season in 1988, Mario Tolentino designed the ER188 chassis, to be powered by a normally-aspirated 3.5-litre Cosworth DFZ engine. Formula 3000 champion Stefano Modena and long-time Brun stalwart Oscar Larrauri were signed to drive. Despite a solid if unspectacular start to the season, EuroBrun were soon struggling as money ran low. There was internal trouble when Brun unsuccessfully tried to replace Larrauri with Christian Danner, and Euroracing were showing disinterest in Formula One. Both drivers failed to qualify at certain events (Modena missing out four times, and being excluded from another two races for technical infringements, and Larrauri failing seven times), and Modena's 11th place at the Hungarian Grand Prix was their best result.

Before the 1989 season, Euroracing slimmed down to a nominal level of involvement, in the shape of a handful of engineers and mechanics. EuroBrun scaled back to a single car, to be driven by German Grand Prix did not help. Foitek quit after the Belgian Grand Prix, to be replaced by the returning Larrauri, who was no more successful.

Despite failing to start a single race in 1989, the team returned in 1990 with two cars once again. Euroracing had now left the partnership altogether, and the team started the season with the ER189. Roberto Moreno led the team, with Claudio Langes in the second car. Langes would not make it through pre-qualifying once. A freak qualifying session at the opening race of the season in the United States saw Moreno start 16th on the grid, and he eventually finished 13th. The capable Brazilian qualified again in San Marino, and came close on other occasions, but as Brun lost enthusiasm, the EuroBruns fell further and further away from the grid. After 14 rounds, the team withdrew from the Formula One Championship, having made only 21 starts from 76 entries.

Complete Formula One results

()
Year Chassis Engines Tyres No. Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Points WCC
1988 ER188 Ford Cosworth DFZ 3.5 V8 BRA SMR MON MEX CAN DET FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA POR ESP JPN AUS 0 NC
32 Oscar Larrauri Ret DNQ Ret 13 Ret Ret Ret DNQ 16 DNQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNQ DNQ Ret
33 Stefano Modena Ret NC DSQ DSQ 12 Ret 14 12 Ret 11 DNQ DNQ DNQ 13 DNQ Ret
1989 ER188B
ER189
Judd CV 3.5 V8 P BRA SMR MON MEX USA CAN FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA POR ESP JPN AUS 0 NC
33    Gregor Foitek DNQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ
Oscar Larrauri DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ
1990 ER189B Judd CV 3.5 V8 P USA BRA SMR MON CAN MEX FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA POR ESP JPN AUS 0 NC
33 Roberto Moreno 13 DNPQ Ret DNQ DNQ DSQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ
34 Claudio Langes DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ

References

  • Team Profile at Grand Prix Encyclopedia
  • Team profile at F1 rejects
  • Results from Formula1.com
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