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Félix Auger-Aliassime

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Félix Auger-Aliassime

Félix Auger-Aliassime
Country (sports)  Canada
Residence Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Born (2000-08-08) August 8, 2000
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money $3,280
Singles
Career record 0–0 (at ATP Tour level, Grand Slam level, and in Davis Cup)
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 746 (August 17, 2015)
Current ranking No. 746 (August 17, 2015)
Grand Slam Singles results
US Open Junior 2R (2015)
Doubles
Career record 0–0 (at ATP Tour level, Grand Slam level, and in Davis Cup)
Career titles 0
Grand Slam Doubles results
US Open Junior W (2015)
Last updated on: August 17, 2015.

Félix Auger-Aliassime (born August 8, 2000) is a Canadian junior tennis player. He reached a career high ATP singles ranking of No. 746 on August 17, 2015 and a career high ITF junior ranking of No. 23 on September 14, 2015. In July 2015, he became the youngest player to break the Top 800 on the ATP rankings at No. 749.[1] Auger-Aliassime won the 2015 US Open junior doubles title with compatriot Denis Shapovalov.[2]

Contents

  • Early life 1
  • Tennis career 2
    • 2015 2.1
  • Junior Grand Slam finals 3
    • Doubles: 1 (1 title) 3.1
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Early life

Auger-Aliassime was born in Montreal but raised in L'Ancienne-Lorette, a suburb of Quebec City. His father Sam Aliassime is from Togo and his mother Marie Auger from the province of Quebec. He has an older sister Malika who also plays tennis. He started playing tennis at 4 and trained at the Club Avantage as a member of the Académie de Tennis Hérisset-Bordeleau in Quebec City.[3] In 2012, he won the Open Super Auray in the age 11 to 12 category.[4] He has been a member of Tennis Canada's National Training Centre in Montreal since the fall of 2014.[5]

Tennis career

2015

In February, Auger-Aliassime won his first ITF junior singles title at the G3 in Querétaro.[6] A week later, he won his second straight ITF junior singles title and first doubles title at the G4 in Zapopan.[7] At the Challenger Banque Nationale de Drummondville in March, Auger-Aliassime became the youngest player in history to qualify for an ATP Challenger main draw at 14-and-a-half-year-old. He defeated compatriot Jack Mingjie Lin, former World No. 67 Chris Guccione and World No. 433 Fritz Wolmarans to do so. He however was forced to withdraw before playing his first round match due to an abdominal strain. With the points earned, Auger-Aliassime made once again history as the first player born in the 2000s to have an ATP ranking.[8]

At the Challenger Banque Nationale de Granby in July, he qualified for his second ATP Challenger main draw with victories over fellow Canadian Jack Mingjie Lin and World No. 574 Jean-Yves Aubone. He won his opening round in straight sets over World No. 493 Andrew Whittington, becoming the youngest player to win a main draw ATP Challenger match.[9] In the next round, he scored the biggest win of his career to date when he upset World No. 205 Darian King in straight sets.[10] He was stopped by World No. 145 Yoshihito Nishioka in three sets in the quarterfinals.[11] After his run to the quarterfinals, Auger-Aliassime became the youngest player ever to break the Top 800 on the ATP rankings at No. 749.[1] In late August, he won his first junior G1 title with a victory over compatriot Denis Shapovalov in College Park.[12] At the US Open in September, his first junior Grand Slam, he reached the second round in singles and won the doubles title with fellow Canadian Denis Shapovalov.[2] In October, Auger-Aliassime and compatriots Denis Shapovalov and Benjamin Sigouin won the Junior Davis Cup title, the first time in history for Canada.[13]

Junior Grand Slam finals

Doubles: 1 (1 title)

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score
Winner 2015 US Open Hard Denis Shapovalov Brandon Holt
Riley Smith
7–5, 7–6(7–3)

References

  1. ^ a b "Meet Felix Auger-Aliassime, the 14-year-old beating pro players nearly 10 years older". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved July 28, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b "Canadian junior boys win U.S. Open doubles final". CBC Sports. Retrieved September 13, 2015. 
  3. ^ "Le tennis, une histoire de famille chez les Auger-Aliassime". Le Soleil. Retrieved July 22, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Un junior du Club s’illustre sur la scène du tennis en France". Club Avantage. Retrieved July 22, 2015. 
  5. ^ Tsonga et Monfils" au Centre national de tennis""". La Presse. Retrieved July 22, 2015. 
  6. ^ "Drawsheet". ITFTennis.com. Retrieved July 22, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Drawsheet". ITFTennis.com. Retrieved July 22, 2015. 
  8. ^ "14 year old makes Emirates ATP rankings history". ATPWorldTour.com. Retrieved July 22, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Canadian 14-year-old Felix Auger-Aliassime becomes youngest tennis player to win main draw Challenger match". Retrieved July 22, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Challenger de Granby: Félix Auger-Aliassime élimine une tête de série". La Presse. Retrieved July 23, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Auger-Aliassime: la fin du conte de fée". La Voix de l'Est. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  12. ^ "Drawsheet". ITFTennis.com. Retrieved August 29, 2015. 
  13. ^ "Czechs and Canadians crowned Junior champions". ITFTennis.com. Retrieved October 5, 2015. 

External links

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