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Field reporter

A sideline reporter is a professional journalist who assists a sports broadcasting crew with sideline coverage of the playing field or court. The sideline reporter typically makes live updates on injuries and breaking news or conducts player interviews while players are on the field or court because the play-by-play broadcaster and color commentator must remain in their broadcast booth.

Origins of sideline reporting

Jim Lampley is considered[by whom?] to be the first sideline reporter. According to Lampley, the job grew out of the wreckage of the 1972 Munich Olympics, when new wireless technology was put to use in ABC's Quicksilver coverage of the Israeli hostage crisis and the subsequent massacre. As Lampley recalled, "Months later, they asked, 'What else could we do? Would it work in a football stadium? Could we put someone on the sidelines?'"[this quote needs a citation] The first broadcast with a sideline reporter was the UCLA Bruins vs. Tennessee Volunteers football game in 1974.

Stigma

After controversies with multiple sideline reporters such as Jenn Sterger or Ines Sainz, the stereotype that sideline reporters lack fundamental knowledge has plagued the now popular sportscasting role. This has been exacerbated by news such as the 2010 sexual harassment scandal involving Ines Sainz.[1] Sideline reporters are hard working and knowledgeable parts of a broadcast team.[opinion] Lampley's replacement in 1977 was Anne Simon. Many sideline reporters have moved on to have great success in the broadcast booth, studio jobs, commercials, and acting roles.

Types

There are different types of sideline reporters depending on the sport:

Notable sideline reporters

Footnotes

References


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