World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Fire photography

Article Id: WHEBN0015958182
Reproduction Date:

Title: Fire photography  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Outline of photography, Picture peer review/Archives/Jul-Sep 2008, Fire, Snoot, Jitter (optics)
Collection: Fire, Photographs by Topic, Photography by Genre
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Fire photography

A photograph of a major fire.

Fire photography is the act of taking photographs of firefighting operations. Individuals that practise this form of photography are called fire photographers.

Since fire photography involves being close to dangerous situations, fire photographers must have special skills and knowledge about emergency incident scenes, operations, health and safety.[1] Fire photographers are often required to wear firefighter protective equipment.[2]

Contents

  • Uses of fire photography 1
  • Involvement with fire departments 2
  • Certification 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Uses of fire photography

The work of fire photographers encompasses multiple applications. These include:

Involvement with fire departments

In general, fire photographers are not directly employed by fire departments.[3] They provide a specialized photography service which may involve a fee per-photograph. Access to safety perimeters can be an issue for fire photographers, thus they usually develop good relationships with their local fire department to improve access to fire scenes. Such access may, at the fire department's discretion, require additional training or other arrangements.[4]

Certification

A formal fire photographer certification process is being drafted by the International Organization of Fire Photography (IOFP). The intent of this certification is to attest that an individual has sufficient training, skills and knowledge in relevant areas (health & safety, firefighting operations, etc.) to operate within a safety perimeter of an emergency incident scene.

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^

External links

  • International Fire Photographers Association
  • Wisconsin Public Safety Photography
  • Quebec Fire Photographers Association
  • New Jersey Metro Fire Photographers Association
  • Emergency Photographers Network of Southern California
  • Connecticut Fire Photographers Association
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.