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Flatwoods, Kentucky

 

Flatwoods, Kentucky

City of Flatwoods, Kentucky
City
B.F. Crager Park in Flatwoods.
B.F. Crager Park in Flatwoods.
Nickname(s): Good Neighbor Community
Location in the state of Kentucky
Location in the state of Kentucky
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Kentucky
County Greenup
Government
 • Mayor Ron Fields (D)
Area
 • Total 4.5 sq mi (11.6 km2)
 • Land 4.5 sq mi (11.6 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 682 ft (208 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 7,423
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 41139
Area code(s) 606
FIPS code 21-27802
GNIS feature ID 0492225
Website http://www.flatwoodsky.org

Flatwoods is a city in Greenup County, Kentucky, United States. Flatwoods is considered a suburb of nearby Ashland, although Ashland itself is located in neighboring Boyd County. The population was 7,423 at the 2010 census, making Flatwoods the largest city in Greenup County. Flatwoods is a part of the Huntington-Ashland, WV-KY-OH, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). As of the 2000 census, the MSA had a population of 288,649.

Flatwoods is a home rule-class city.[1] Locally, Flatwoods is considered to be a bedroom community, as it has no large employer within the city. Many residents work for CSX Transportation, AK Steel, Marathon Oil, King's Daughters Medical Center or Our Lady of Bellefonte Hospital.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
    • Climate 2.1
  • Demographics 3
  • Education 4
  • Television & Radio 5
    • Radio 5.1
    • Television 5.2
  • Points of interest 6
  • Notable people 7
  • References 8
  • External links 9

History

The area now known as the City of Flatwoods was originally named Advance:[2] Advance Methodist Church formed a Sunday school beginning in 1860. The name was later changed to Cheap, after John Cheap, a blind clergyman.[3] The original farming community returned to the name of Advance when a post office was established in 1918. In 1938, the post office was renamed Flatwoods, and the town was incorporated the same year under that name. Flatwoods is named for the area's unique topography, a belt of flat wooded land in the ancient Teays River Valley on an elevation of approximately 650 feet or higher, just south of the Ohio River Valley. The availability of flat level land and low tax rates made Flatwoods a local hot spot of new construction in the 1950s and 1960s, when many upper middle-class tract housing developments were built and quickly inhabited. A main contributor to Flatwoods' growth was the fact that nearby Ashland had developed much of its available land prior to 1960, with little new construction possible within its corporation limits.[4]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.5 square miles (12 km2), all land.

The topography of Flatwoods is uncharacteristic to eastern Kentucky in that it consists of totally flat to rolling land on a single elevated hill. In eastern Kentucky, the dissected plateau landscape often referred to as "hill and valley" is standard terrain for the surrounding region. The flat terrain found in Flatwoods was created when it was the river bed of the ancient Teays River, which traveled through the area in prehistoric times, much larger than the Ohio River that now passes through the region.

Climate

Climate data for Flatwoods, Kentucky
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 81
(27)
79
(26)
92
(33)
96
(36)
98
(37)
102
(39)
107
(42)
106
(41)
103
(39)
94
(34)
86
(30)
79
(26)
107
(42)
Average high °F (°C) 42
(6)
48
(9)
57
(14)
68
(20)
77
(25)
85
(29)
88
(31)
86
(30)
80
(27)
69
(21)
57
(14)
46
(8)
66.6
(19.2)
Average low °F (°C) 21
(−6)
24
(−4)
34
(1)
42
(6)
51
(11)
60
(16)
64
(18)
63
(17)
56
(13)
44
(7)
35
(2)
27
(−3)
43.4
(6.3)
Record low °F (°C) −15
(−26)
−6
(−21)
−6
(−21)
12
(−11)
26
(−3)
37
(3)
40
(4)
41
(5)
28
(−2)
17
(−8)
1
(−17)
−24
(−31)
−24
(−31)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 2.70
(68.6)
2.90
(73.7)
3.70
(94)
3.70
(94)
4.20
(106.7)
3.80
(96.5)
4.80
(121.9)
4.20
(106.7)
2.90
(73.7)
2.80
(71.1)
3.20
(81.3)
3.40
(86.4)
42.3
(1,074)
Source: The Weather Channel.[5]

Demographics

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 7,605 people, 3,114 households, and 2,282 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,691.9 people per square mile (654.0/km²). There were 3,338 housing units at an average density of 742.6 per square mile (287.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 98.19% White, 0.38% African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.36% Asian, 0.30% from other races, and 0.58% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.58% of the population.

There were 3,114 households out of which 31.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.0% were married couples living together, 12.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.7% were non-families. 24.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 2.85.

In the city the population was spread out with 23.0% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 28.0% from 25 to 44, 25.0% from 45 to 64, and 16.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 87.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $31,115, and the median income for a family was $39,023. Males had a median income of $36,184 versus $20,904 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,633. About 9.7% of families and 11.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.0% of those under age 18 and 10.3% of those age 65 or over.

Education

The majority of the city sits within the Russell Independent School District, which also includes the cities of Russell and Bellefonte. The main campus for the district, which includes Russell High School, Russell Middle School, Russell Primary School and the Russell Area Technology Center, sits on the Russell/Flatwoods city line (the school's mailing addresses are Russell but they primarily receive police and fire protection from Flatwoods). In addition, one school, Russell-McDowell Intermediate School, sits firmly within the Flatwoods city limits. Some students in a small section of the city (near The Oaks golf course) attend the Raceland-Worthington Independent Schools.

There are six institutions of higher education located within an hour drive of Flatwoods: Ashland Community and Technical College in Ashland, Kentucky Christian University in Grayson, Ohio University Southern Campus in Ironton, Ohio, Shawnee State University in Portsmouth, Ohio as well as Marshall University and Mountwest Community and Technical College, both of which are located in Huntington.

Television & Radio

Radio

  • 100.5 WKEE
  • 93.7 The Dawg
  • 98.7 The Plannet
  • 101.5 Big Buck Country
  • 103.3 WTCR
  • Kool Hits 105.7

Television

Points of interest

  • The Oaks - an 18 hole public golf course.

Notable people

References

  1. ^ "Summary and Reference Guide to House Bill 331 City Classification Reform" (PDF). Kentucky League of Cities. Retrieved December 30, 2014. 
  2. ^ Commonwealth of Kentucky. Office of the Secretary of State. Land Office. "Flatwoods, Kentucky". Accessed 25 Jul 2013.
  3. ^ Rennick, Robert M. (28 August 2013). Kentucky Place Names. University Press of Kentucky. p. 199.  
  4. ^ About Flatwoods Retrieved on 2010-05-29
  5. ^ "MONTHLY AVERAGES for Flatwoods, KY".  
  6. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  8. ^ "American FactFinder".  

External links

  • Chamber of Commerce
  • Greenup County Tourism Commission
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