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Football at the Asian Games

Football at the Asian Games
Founded 1951
Region AFC (Asia)
Number of teams 24
Current champions  South Korea (2014)
Most successful team(s)  South Korea (4 titles)
Football at the 2014 Asian Games

Men's Association football is an Asian Games sport since the 1951 edition. Women's football competition began in 1990.

Since the 2002 Asian Games, age limit for men teams is under-23 plus up to three over aged players for each squad,[1] same as the age limit in football competitions at the Summer Olympics.

Contents

  • Men's tournaments 1
    • Summaries 1.1
    • Medal table 1.2
  • Women's tournaments 2
    • Medal table 2.1
  • References 3

Men's tournaments

Summaries

Year Host Final Third Place
Gold Medal Score Silver Medal Bronze Medal Score Fourth Place
1951
details

New Delhi, India

India
1–0
Iran

Japan
2–0
Afghanistan
1954
details

Manila, Philippines

Republic of China
5–2
South Korea

Burma
5–4
Indonesia
1958
details

Tokyo, Japan

Republic of China
3–2
South Korea

Indonesia
4–1
India
1962
details

Jakarta, Indonesia

India
2–1
South Korea

Malaya
4–1
South Vietnam
1966
details

Bangkok, Thailand

Burma
1–0
Iran

Japan
2–0
Singapore
1970
details

Bangkok, Thailand

Burma


South Korea
0–0 aet1
India
1–0
Japan
1974
details

Tehran, Iran

Iran
1–0
Israel

Malaysia
2–1
North Korea
1978
details

Bangkok, Thailand

North Korea


South Korea
0–0 aet1
China PR
1–0
Iraq
1982
details

New Delhi, India

Iraq
1–0
Kuwait

Saudi Arabia
2–02
North Korea
1986
details

Seoul, South Korea

South Korea
2–0
Saudi Arabia

Kuwait
5–0
Indonesia
1990
details

Beijing, China

Iran
0–0 aet
(4–1) pen

North Korea

South Korea
1–0
Thailand
1994
details

Hiroshima, Japan

Uzbekistan
4–2
China PR

Kuwait
2–1
South Korea
1998
details

Bangkok, Thailand

Iran
2–0
Kuwait

China PR
3–0
Thailand
2002
details

Busan, South Korea

Iran
2–1
Japan

South Korea
3–0
Thailand
2006
details

Doha, Qatar

Qatar
1–0
Iraq

Iran
1–0 aet
South Korea
2010
details

Guangzhou, China

Japan
1–0
United Arab Emirates

South Korea
4–3
Iran
2014
details

Incheon, South Korea

South Korea
1–0
North Korea

Iraq
1–0
Thailand
2018
details

Jakarta, Indonesia

1 The title was shared.
2 Saudi Arabia were awarded the third-place playoff by default after the Korea DPR team were handed a two-year suspension for assaulting officials at the end of their semi-final.

Medal table

Team Gold Silver Bronze
 South Korea 4 (1970, 1978, 1986*, 2014*) 3 (1954, 1958, 1962) 3 (1990, 2002*, 2010)
 Iran 4 (1974*, 1990, 1998, 2002) 2 (1951, 1966) 1 (2006)
 India 2 (1951*, 1962) 1 (1970)
 Myanmar 2 (1966, 1970) 1 (1954)
 Chinese Taipei 2 (1954, 1958)
 North Korea 1 (1978) 2 (1990, 2014)
 Japan 1 (2010) 1 (2002) 2 (1951, 1966)
 Iraq 1 (1982) 1 (2006) 1 (2014)
 Qatar 1 (2006*)
 Uzbekistan 1 (1994)
 Kuwait 2 (1982, 1998) 2 (1986, 1994)
 China PR 1 (1994) 2 (1978, 1998)
 Saudi Arabia 1 (1986) 1 (1982)
 Israel 1 (1974)
 United Arab Emirates 1 (2010)
 Malaysia 2 (1962, 1974)
 Indonesia 1 (1958)
* = host

Women's tournaments

In 1990 a women's tournament was started.[2]

Year Host Final Third Place
Gold Medal Score Silver Medal Bronze Medal Score Fourth Place
1990
details

Beijing, China

China PR

Japan

North Korea

Chinese Taipei
1994
details

Hiroshima, Japan

China PR
2–0
Japan

Chinese Taipei

South Korea
1998
details

Bangkok, Thailand

China PR
1–0
North Korea

Japan
2–1
Chinese Taipei
2002
details

Busan, South Korea

North Korea

China PR

Japan

South Korea
2006
details

Doha, Qatar

North Korea
0–0 aet
(4–2) pen

Japan

China PR
2–0
South Korea
2010
details

Guangzhou, China

Japan
1–0
North Korea

South Korea
2–0
China PR
2014
details

Incheon, South Korea

North Korea
3–1
Japan

South Korea
3–0
Vietnam
2018
details

Jakarta, Indonesia

^3 Round-robin tournament
^4 Decided by round-robin standings

Medal table

Team Gold Silver Bronze
 North Korea 3 (2002, 2006, 2014) 2 (1998, 2010) 1 (1990)
 China PR 3 (1990*, 1994, 1998) 1 (2002) 1 (2006)
 Japan 1 (2010) 4 (1990*, 1994, 2006, 2014) 2 (1998, 2002)
 South Korea 2 (2010,2014*)
 Chinese Taipei 1 (1994)
* = host

References

  • RSSSF archive
  1. ^ "PFF chief names Akhtar as head coach of Asian Games team".  
  2. ^ "Asian Games (Women's Tournament)". RSSSF. Retrieved 21 November 2014. 
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