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Forrest Ackerman

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Forrest Ackerman

Forrest J Ackerman
Forry Ackerman at the Ackermansion, 1990
Born Forrest James Ackerman
(1916-11-24)November 24, 1916
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Died December 4, 2008(2008-12-04) (aged 92)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Parents Carroll Cridland
William Schilling Ackerman

Forrest J Ackerman[1] (born Forest James Ackerman; November 24, 1916 – December 4, 2008) was an American collector of science fiction books and movie memorabilia and a science fiction fan. He was, for over seven decades, one of science fiction's staunchest spokesmen and promoters.

Ackerman was a

Also called "Forry," "The Ackermonster," "4e" and "4SJ," Ackerman was central to the formation, organization, and spread of science fiction fandom, and a key figure in the wider cultural perception of science fiction as a literary, art and film genre. Famous for his word play and neologisms, he coined the genre nickname "sci-fi".[6][7][8] In 1953, he was voted "#1 Fan Personality" by the members of the World Science Fiction Society, a unique Hugo Award never granted to anyone else.[9]

He was also among the first and most outspoken advocates of Esperanto in the science fiction community.[3][10]

Personal life

Ackerman was born Forest James Ackerman (though he would refer to himself from the early 1930s on as "Forrest J Ackerman" with no period after the middle initial), on November 24, 1916,[6] in Los Angeles, to Carroll Cridland (née Wyman; 1883–1977) and William Schilling Ackerman (1892–1951).[11][12] His father was from New York and his mother was from Ohio (the daughter of architect George Wyman); she was nine years older than William.[13] He attended the University of California at Berkeley for a year (1934–1935), worked as a movie projectionist, and spent three years in the U.S. Army after enlisting on August 15, 1942.[12][14]

He was married to teacher and translator Wendayne (Wendy) Wahrman (1912–1990) until her death. Her original first name was Matilda; Forry created "Wendayne" for her.[3] Wendayne suffered a serious head injury when she was violently mugged while on a trip to Europe in 1990, and the injury soon after led to her death.

Ackerman was fluent in the international language Esperanto, and claimed to have walked down Hollywood Boulevard arm-in-arm with Leo G. Carroll singing La Espero, the hymn of Esperanto.[10]

Ackerman was an atheist.

Career and fandom

Ackerman saw his first "imagi-movie" in 1922 (One Glorious Day[15]), purchased his first science fiction magazine, Amazing Stories, in 1926, created The Boys' Scientifiction Club in 1930 ("girl-fans were as rare as unicorn's horns in those days"). He contributed to both of the first science fiction fanzines, The Time Traveller, and the Science Fiction Magazine, published and edited by Shuster & Siegel of Superman fame, in 1932, and by 1933 had 127 correspondents around the world. His name was used for the character of the reporter in the original Superman story "The Reign of the Super-Man" in issue 3 of Science Fiction magazine.[16] He was one of the early members of the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society, and remained active in it for many decades.


He attended the 1st World Science Fiction Convention in 1939, where he wore the first "futuristicostume"[17][18] (designed and created by Myrtle R. Douglas) and sparked fan costuming, the latest incarnation of which is cosplay. He attended every Worldcon but two thereafter during his lifetime. Ackerman invited Ray Bradbury to attend the Los Angeles Chapter of the Science Fiction League, then meeting weekly at Clifton's Cafeteria in downtown Los Angeles. The club changed its name to the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society during the period it was meeting at the restaurant. (There never was a "Clifton’s Cafeteria Science Fiction Club.") Among the writers frequenting the club were Robert A. Heinlein, Emil Petaja, Fredric Brown, Henry Kuttner, Leigh Brackett, and Jack Williamson. Bradbury often attended meetings with his friend Ray Harryhausen; the two Rays had been introduced to each other by Ackerman. With $90 from Ackerman, Bradbury launched a fanzine, Futuria Fantasia, in 1939.

Ackerman was an early member of the Los Angeles Chapter of the Science Fiction League, and became so active in and important to the club, that in essence he ran it, including after the name change the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society, a prominent regional organization, as well as the National Fantasy Fan Federation (N3F).

Ackerman amassed an extremely large and complete collection of science fiction, fantasy and horror film memorabilia, which, until 2002, he maintained in a remarkable 18-room home and museum known as the "Son of Ackermansion." (The original Ackermansion where he lived from the early 1950s until the mid-1970s, was at 915 S. Sherbourne Drive in Los Angeles; the site is now an apartment building.) This second house, in the Los Feliz district of Los Angeles, contained some 300,000 books and pieces of movie and science-fiction memorabilia. From 1951 to 2002, Ackerman entertained some 50,000 fans at open houses- including, on one such evening, a group of 186 fans and professionals including astronaut Buzz Aldrin. Ackerman was a board member of the Seattle Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame, where many items of his collection are now displayed.

He knew most of the writers of science fiction in the first half of the twentieth-century. As a literary agent, he represented some 200 writers, and he served as agent of record for many long lost authors, thereby allowing their work to be reprinted in anthologies. He was Ed Wood's "illiterary" agent.[19] Ackerman was credited with nurturing and even inspiring the careers of several early contemporaries[20] like Ray Bradbury, Ray Harryhausen, Charles Beaumont, Marion Zimmer Bradley and L. Ron Hubbard.[3] He kept all of the stories submitted to his magazine, even the ones he rejected; Stephen King has stated that Ackerman showed up to a King book signing with a copy of a story King had submitted for publication when he was 11.[21]

Ackerman had 50 stories published, including collaborations with A. E. van Vogt, Francis Flagg, Robert A. W. Lowndes, Marion Zimmer Bradley, Donald Wollheim and Catherine Moore and the world's shortest – one letter of the alphabet. His stories have been translated into six languages. Ackerman named the sexy comic-book character Vampirella and wrote the origin story for the comic.

He also authored several lesbian stories under the name "Laurajean Ermayne" for Vice Versa and provided publishing assistance in the early days of the Daughters of Bilitis.[22] He was dubbed an "honorary lesbian" at a DOB party.[23]

Through his magazine, Famous Monsters of Filmland (1958–1983), Ackerman introduced the history of the science fiction, fantasy and horror film genres to a generation of young readers.[24] At a time when most movie-related publications glorified the stars in front of the camera, "Uncle Forry", as he was referred to by many of his fans, promoted the behind-the-scenes artists involved in the magic of movies. In this way, Ackerman provided inspiration to many who would later become successful artists, including Joe Dante, Peter Jackson, Steven Spielberg, Tim Burton, Stephen King, Donald F. Glut, Penn & Teller, Billy Bob Thornton, Gene Simmons (of the band Kiss), Rick Baker, George Lucas, Danny Elfman, Frank Darabont, John Landis and countless other writers, directors, artists and craftsmen.

He also contributed to film magazines from all around the world, including Spanish speaking La Cosa: Cine Fantástico magazine, from Argentina, where he had a monthly column for over four years.

In the 1960s, Ackerman organized the publication of an English translation in the U.S. of the German science fiction series Perry Rhodan, the longest science fiction series in history. These were published by Ace Books from 1969 through 1977. Ackerman's German-speaking wife Wendayne ("Wendy") did most of the translation. The American books were issued with varying frequency from one to as many as four per month. Ackerman also used the paperback series to promote science fiction short stories, including his own on occasion. These "magabooks" or "bookazines" also included a film review section, known as "Scientifilm World", and letters from readers. The American series came to an end when the management of Ace changed, and the new management decided that the series was too juvenile for their taste. The last Ace issue was #118, which corresponded to German issue #126 as some of the Ace editions contained two of the German issues, and three of the German issues had been skipped. Forry later published translations of German issues #127 through #145 on his own under the Master Publications imprint. (The original German series continues today and passed issue #2600 in 2011.)

Appearances in film, television and music

A lifelong fan of science fiction "B-movies", Ackerman had cameos in over 210 films, including bit parts in many monster movies and science fiction films (The Howling, Innocent Blood, Return of the Living Dead Part II), more traditional "imagi-movies" The Time Travelers, Future War, spoofs and comedies (Amazon Women on the Moon, Attack of the 60 Foot Centerfold, The Wizard of Speed and Time), and at least one major music video (Michael Jackson's Thriller). His Bacon number is 2.

In 1961, Ackerman narrated the record Music for Robots created by Frank Allison Coe. The cover featured Forrest Ackerman's face superimposed on the movie robot Tobor the Great. The record was reissued on CD in 2005.

Ackerman himself appeared as a character in The Vampire Affair by David McDaniel (a novel in the Man from U.N.C.L.E. series), and Philip José Farmer's novel Blown. A character based on Ackerman, and his "Ackermansion", appears in the Niven/Pournelle collaboration Fallen Angels. Another character, "Eccar the Man", is mentioned in the Niven/Gerrold collaboration The Flying Sorcerers.

He appeared on the intro track of Ohio horrorpunk music group Manimals' 1999 album Horrorcore.[25]

In 2001 Ackerman played the part of an old wax museum caretaker in the camp comedy film The Double-D Avenger directed by William Winckler and starring Russ Meyer stars Kitten Natividad, Haji, and Raven De La Croix. Ackerman played a crazy old man who was in love with Kitten Natividad's character, The Double-D Avenger, and he also talked to the Frankenstein figure and other wax monsters in the museum's chamber of horrors.

Ackerman appeared extensively on-screen discussing his life and the history of science fiction fandom in the 2006 documentary film Finding the Future.[26]

In 2007, Roadhouse Films of Canada released a documentary, Famous Monster: Forrest J Ackerman. The documentary, available on DVD only in the UK, airs regularly on the BRAVO channel.

In the 2012 action film Premium Rush, the character of the corrupt cop Bobby Monday (played by Michael Shannon) repeatedly uses the alias "Forrest J. Ackerman."

Death

In 2003, Ackerman said, "I aim at hitting 100 and becoming the George Burns of science fiction". His health, however, had been failing, and he last logged into his Myspace page on March 19, 2008. Forrest was susceptible to infection in his later life and, after one final trip to the hospital, informed his best friend and caregiver Joe Moe that he didn't want to go on. Honoring his wishes, his friends brought him home to hospice care. However, it turned out that in order to get Ackerman home, the hospital had cured his infection with antibiotics. So Forrest went on for a few more weeks holding what he delighted in calling, "a living funeral". In his final days he saw everyone he wanted to say good-bye to. Fans were encouraged to send messages of farewell by mail.[27] There were several premature reports of his death beginning November 6, 2008.[28] John Landis recalled that "Although he was extremely ill he told me he could not die until he voted for Obama for President and he did."[29] Forrest J Ackerman is interred at Glendale Forest Lawn with his wife Wendayne "Rocket To The Rue Morgue" Ackerman. His plaque simply reads, "Sci-Fi Was My High".In 2000, Ackerman appeared on the PBS program Visiting... with Huell Howser which highlighted his collection of memorabilia. The program was rebroadcast in 2013 and titles were changed to reflect that Ackerman had since died and his collection had been auctioned off.

He died on December 4, 2008,[1][3][24][30] at the age of 92. From his "Acker-mini-mansion" in Hollywood, he had entertained and inspired fans weekly with his collection of memorabilia and his stories.

Writing

Non-fiction

  • A Reference Guide to American Science Fiction Films
  • The Frankenscience Monster, 1969, paperback, Ace Books #25130
  • Forrest J Ackerman's Worlds of Science Fiction
  • Famous Forrie Fotos: Over 70 Years of Ackermemories, 117pp, trade paperback, 2001, Sense of Wonder Press, James A. Rock & Co., Publishers
  • Mr. Monster's Movie Gold, A Treasure-Trove Of Imagi-Movies
  • Worlds of Tomorrow: the Amazing Universe of Science Fiction Art w/Brad Linaweaver. ISBN 1-888054-93-X. 178pp. 2004 Collectors Press
  • Lon of 1000 Faces
  • Famous Monster of Filmland #1: An encyclopedia of the first 50 issues
  • Famous Monster of Filmland #2: An encyclopedia of issues 50–100
  • Metropolis by Thea von Harbou – intro and "stillustration" by FJ Ackerman

Anthologies

  • Rainbow Fantasia: 35 Spectrumatic Tales of Wonder, 559pp., 2001, hardbound and trade paperback, Sense of Wonder Press, James A. Rock & Co., Publishers
  • Science Fiction Worlds of Forrest J Ackerman
  • Best Science Fiction for 1973
  • The Gernsback Awards Vol. 1, 1926
  • Gosh! Wow! (Sense of Wonder) Science Fiction'"
  • Reel futures
  • I, Vampire: Interviews with the Undead
  • Ackermanthology: Millennium Edition: 65 Astonishing Rediscovered Sci-Fi Shorts, Sense of Wonder Press, James A. Rock & Co., Publishers)
  • Womanthology, (w/Pam Keesey) 352pp, hardbound and trade paperback, 2003, Sense of Wonder Press, James A. Rock & Co., Publishers
  • Martianthology (ed.by Anne Hardin), 266pp, hardbound and trade paperback, 2003, Sense of Wonder Press, James A. Rock & Co., Publishers
  • Film Futures
  • Expanded Science Fiction Worlds of Forrest J Ackerman and Friends, PLUS, 205pp, hardbound and trade paperback, 2002, Sense of Wonder Press, James A. Rock & Co., Publishers
  • Dr. Acula's Thrilling Tales of the Uncanny, xiv+267pp. Trade Paper, Sense of Woder Press, James A. Rock & Co., Publishers.
  • Forrest J Ackerman presents Anthology Of The Living Dead 318pp, trade paperback, 2009, Black Bed Sheets Books, Publishers.

Short stories

  • “Nyusa, Nymph of Darkness “
  • “The Shortest Story Ever Told “
  • “A Martian Oddity”
  • “Earth's Lucky Day “
  • “The Record “
  • “Micro Man “
  • “Tarzan and the Golden Lion “
  • “Dhactwhu!-Remember? “
  • “Kiki”
  • “The Mute Question”
  • “Atoms and Stars”
  • “The Lady Takes a Powder”
  • “Sabina of the White Cylinder”
  • “What an Idea!”
  • “Death Rides the Spaceways”
  • “Dwellers in the Dust”
  • “Burn Witch, Burn”
  • “Yvala”
  • “The Girl Who Wasn't There”
  • “Count Down to Doom “
  • “Time to Change “
  • “And Then the Cover Was Bare”
  • “The Atomic Monument”
  • “Letter to an Angel”
  • “The Man Who Was Thirsty “
  • “The Radclyffe Effect”
  • “Cosmic Report Card: Earth”
  • “Great Gog's Grave”
  • “The Naughty Venuzian”

Awards

  • Hugo Award: Number 1 Fan Personality, 1953
  • Inducted to the Monster Kid Hall Of Fame at The Rondo Hatton Classic Horror Awards
  • Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement, 1996
  • Mangled Skyscraper Award at G-FEST '99 for contributions to the giant monster genre
  • World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement, 2002[31]

Notes

References

  • Internet Movie Database
  • Internet Speculative Fiction Database
  • SFWA Obituary
  • 4e's Foyer: biography
  • SFSite: Gary Westfahl's Biographical Encyclopedia
  • Article on Ackerman's persona and life

External links

Biography portal
  • Forrest J. Ackerman appears onstage at the 40th anniversary of "The Time Machine"
  • Interview and shoot with Forrest J Ackerman, Bizarre Magazine
  • Audio Interview with Forrest J Ackerman
  • Scientifilm Previews by Forrest J Ackerman
  • Roadhouse Film's Famous Monster documentary page
  • Project Gutenberg

Template:World Fantasy Award Life Achievement

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