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France national football team manager

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France national football team manager

Didier Deschamps was named manager of the French national team on 8 July 2012.

The France national football team manager was first established on 25 April 1964 following the appointment of the country's first national team manager Henri Delaunay took control.

Following the creation of the French Football Federation, the committee was converted into a five-man board and lasted from 1919–1964. Georges Verriest (1959–1964) controlled the committee until it was officially disbanded in 1964.

Fifteen men have occupied the post since its inception; three of those were in short-term caretaker manager roles: José Arribas and Jean Snella managed the team in dual roles and presided over four matches and former French international Just Fontaine managed the team for two matches in 1967. The longest tenure by a French national team manager is Raymond Domenech, who managed the team from 12 July 2004 to 11 July 2010, a period of six years.[1] Three managers have won major tournaments while managing the national team. The first was Michel Hidalgo, who managed the team from 1976–1984, which is the second-longest tenure behind Domenech.[1] Hidalgo won UEFA Euro 1984. In 1998, Aimé Jacquet won the 1998 FIFA World Cup on home soil and, two years later, Roger Lemerre led the team to glory at UEFA Euro 2000.[2][3] Lemerre also won the 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup.[4] On 8 August 1973, the Romanian Ștefan Kovács became the first foreign manager of the team. During the period of the selection committee, the national team was coached by several English managers. Thomas Griffiths coached the team for a portion of 1924, while Peter Farmer coached the team at the 1928 Summer Olympics. From 1934–1936, the team was coached by Sid Kimpton. The current manager of the French national team is former international Didier Deschamps who replaced fellow international Laurent Blanc following the UEFA Euro 2012 on 8 July 2012.[5]

Contents

  • Statistics 1
    • Unofficial managers 1.1
    • Official managers 1.2
  • References 2
  • External links 3

Statistics

The statistics below detail the managers of the France national football team during their tenure as manager. Though a selection committee was used from 1919–1964, the table details the managerial statistics of the coaches who were under the watch of the selection committee, though the statistics are unofficial as determined by the French Football Federation.[6]

Unofficial managers

Manager France career Played Won Drawn Lost Win % Competitions
Kimpton, SidSid Kimpton1 1934-1936
Barreau, GastonGaston Barreau1 1919–1945 124 39 13 72 31.5 1920 Summer Olympics – 4th Place
1924 Summer Olympics – Quarter-finals
1928 Summer Olympics – First Round
1930 World Cup – Group stage
1934 World Cup – First round
1938 World Cup – Quarter-finals
Hanot, GabrielGabriel Hanot2 1945–1949 21 10 2 9 47.6 1948 Summer Olympics – Quarter-finals
Baron, PaulPaul Baron and Pibarot, PierrePierre Pibarot 1949–1953 30 13 7 10 43.3 1952 Summer Olympics – Preliminary round
Pibarot, PierrePierre Pibarot 1953–1954 4 1 1 2 25.0
Bigot, JulesJules Bigot and Batteux, AlbertAlbert Batteux 1954–1956 11 5 3 3 45.5 1954 World Cup – Group stage
Batteux, AlbertAlbert Batteux3 1956–1960 36 18 9 9 50.0 1958 World Cup – 3rd Place
UEFA Euro 1960 – 4th Place
Batteux, AlbertAlbert Batteux and Guérin, HenriHenri Guérin 1960–1964 22 4 6 12 18.2

Official managers

Manager France career Played Won Drawn Lost Win % Competitions
Guérin, HenriHenri Guérin 1964–1966 15 5 4 6 33.3 1966 World Cup – Group stage
Arribas, JoséJosé Arribas and Snella, JeanJean Snella 1966 4 2 0 2 50.0
Fontaine, JustJust Fontaine 1967 2 0 0 2 00.0
Dugauguez, LouisLouis Dugauguez 1967–1968 9 2 3 4 22.2
Georges Boulogne 1969–1973 31 15 5 11 48.4
Kovács, ȘtefanȘtefan Kovács 1973–1975 15 6 4 5 40.0
Hidalgo, MichelMichel Hidalgo 1976–1984 75 41 16 18 54.7 1978 World Cup – Group stage
1982 World Cup – 4th Place
UEFA Euro 1984Champions
Michel, HenriHenri Michel 1984–1988 36 16 12 8 44.4 1986 World Cup – Third place
Platini, MichelMichel Platini 1988–1992 29 16 8 5 55.2 UEFA Euro 1992 – Group stage
Houllier, GérardGérard Houllier 1992–1993 12 7 1 4 58.3
Jacquet, AiméAimé Jacquet 1994–1998 53 34 16 3 64.2 UEFA Euro 1996 – Semi-finals
1998 World CupChampions
Lemerre, RogerRoger Lemerre 1998–2002 53 34 11 8 64.2 UEFA Euro 2000Champions
2001 Confederations CupChampions
2002 World Cup – Group stage
Santini, JacquesJacques Santini 2002–2004 28 22 4 2 78.6 2003 Confederations CupChampions
UEFA Euro 2004 – Quarter-finals
Domenech, RaymondRaymond Domenech 2004–2010 79 41 24 14 51.9 2006 World Cup – Finalist
UEFA Euro 2008 – Group stage
2010 World Cup – Group stage
Blanc, LaurentLaurent Blanc 2010–2012 27 16 7 4 59.3 UEFA Euro 2012 – Quarter-finals
Deschamps, DidierDidier Deschamps 2012– 22 11 5 6 50.0
Managers in italics were hired as caretakers

1Managerial career as head of selection committee. Team was sometimes trained by physical trainers and coached by assistants. Thomas Griffiths coached the team in 1924, while Englishman Peter Farmer coached the team at the 1928 Summer Olympics. Fellow Englishman Sid Kimpton coached the team for a portion of 1934 and 1935–36.
2Managerial career as head of selection committee. Team was trained by physical trainers Bacquet, Helenio Herrera, and Paul Baron.
3Batteux coached an unofficial France team composed of young players, referred to in France as Espoirs, to an 8–0 victory over Luxembourg in 1953. The match was a qualification match for the 1954 FIFA World Cup. The victory is listed in his 1956–1960 tenure as manager.

References

  1. ^ a b "Domenech set to equal Hidalgo’s record". The Star. 30 May 2010. Retrieved 13 June 2010. 
  2. ^ "Aime Jacquet – What they said". FIFA. Retrieved 13 June 2010. 
  3. ^ "The things they say: Lemerre". FIFA Sport. 26 June 2009. Retrieved 13 June 2010. 
  4. ^ Nixon, Alan (6 July 2002). "Lemerre pays the price for failure". The Independent (London). Retrieved 13 June 2010. 
  5. ^ "Accord Deschamps-FFF". L'Equipe. Retrieved 8 July 2012. 
  6. ^ "AVANT 1964". French Football Federation. Retrieved 4 June 2010. 

External links

  • Official site
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