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Franklin, Missouri

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Franklin, Missouri

Franklin, Missouri
City
Location of Franklin, Missouri
Location of Franklin, Missouri
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Missouri
County Howard
Area[1]
 • Total 0.23 sq mi (0.60 km2)
 • Land 0.23 sq mi (0.60 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 597 ft (182 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 95
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 96
 • Density 413.0/sq mi (159.5/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 65250
Area code(s) 660
FIPS code 29-25624[4]
GNIS feature ID 0718163[5]

Franklin is a city in Howard County, Missouri, United States. It is located along the Missouri River. Part of a rural area, the population was 95 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Columbia, Missouri Metropolitan Statistical Area.

As the eastern terminus of the Santa Fe Trail, the community played a major role in the westward expansion of the United States.

Contents

  • History 1
    • Kit Carson 1.1
  • Geography 2
  • Demographics 3
    • 2010 census 3.1
    • 2000 census 3.2
  • References 4
  • External links 5

History

The town of Franklin was founded in 1816 and named for Founding Father Daniel Boone; the brothers first operated the saltlick business.[7]

In 1821, William Becknell put a notice in the "Missouri Intelligencer" stating he was creating a party to go "westward, for the purpose of trading for horses and mules and catching wild animals of every description." On September 1, 1821, his party crossed the Missouri River at Arrow Rock and set out along what would become known in a few years the Santa Fe Trail.[7]

A devastating flood of the Missouri River destroyed much of Franklin in 1827. Residents rebuilt a short distance away on higher ground, creating New Franklin, Missouri.[6]

Kit Carson

Born in Madison County, Kentucky, near the city of Richmond, Kit Carson was raised in Franklin after migrating there as a boy with his family.[8] Lindsey Carson was a farmer of Scots-Irish descent, who had fought in the Revolutionary War under General Wade Hampton. He had a total of fifteen surviving children: five by his first wife, and ten by his second wife (Kit's mother), Rebecca Robinson.[9][10] The Carson family settled on a tract of land owned by the sons of Daniel Boone, who had purchased the land from the Spanish prior to the United States annexing the territory by the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. The Boone and Carson families became good friends, working, socializing, and intermarrying.

Carson was eight when his father was killed by a falling tree while clearing land. The father's death reduced the Carson family to a desperate poverty, forcing young Kit to drop out of school to work on the family farm, as well as engage in hunting. At the age of 14, Kit was apprenticed to a saddlemaker (Workman's Saddleshop) in Franklin. The town was the eastern terminus of the Santa Fe Trail, which had opened two years earlier. Many of the clientele at the saddleshop were trappers and traders, from whom Kit would hear stirring tales of the Far West. Carson is reported to have found work in the saddle shop suffocating: he once said "the business did not suit me, and I concluded to leave". Around 1826, aged 16, Kit secretly signed on with a large merchant caravan heading to Santa Fe.

Geography

Franklin is located at (39.011316, -92.753747).[11] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.23 square miles (0.60 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 95 people, 42 households, and 26 families residing in the city. The population density was 413.0 inhabitants per square mile (159.5/km2). There were 52 housing units at an average density of 226.1 per square mile (87.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 98.9% White and 1.1% African American. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.1% of the population.

There were 42 households of which 28.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.6% were married couples living together, 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 38.1% were non-families. 31.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.88.

The median age in the city was 47.1 years. 24.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 3.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.1% were from 25 to 44; 36.8% were from 45 to 64; and 13.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 53.7% male and 46.3% female.

2000 census

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 112 people, 47 households, and 28 families residing in the city. The population density was 490.1 people per square mile (188.0/km²). There were 53 housing units at an average density of 231.9 per square mile (89.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 99.11% White, and 0.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.89% of the population.

There were 47 households out of which 31.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.9% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.3% were non-families. 34.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.7% under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 24.1% from 25 to 44, 32.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 86.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $28,542, and the median income for a family was $27,500. Males had a median income of $37,500 versus $21,250 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,104. There were 16.7% of families and 20.8% of the population living below the poverty line, including 39.3% of under eighteens and 37.5% of those over 64.

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010".  
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  3. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  6. ^ a b McMillen, Margot Ford (1994). Paris, Tightwad and Peculiar: Missouri Place Names. Columbia, Missouri: University of Missouri Press. p. 49.  
  7. ^ a b Franklin Missouri - Kansas City Kansas, Santa Fe Trail Research
  8. ^ Quote: "In the spring of 1811, Lindsey Carson, with his wife and nine children [moved by ox team and wagon] from Madison County, Kentucky, to the new Boone's Lick District of the even newer American Territory of Louisiana ... [T]he Carsons and their company of other southerners settled in what is now Howard County, along the Missouri River about 170 miles west of St. Louis ... [In this frontier arose the stockades of Fort Hempstead, Fort Cooper, and Fort Kincaid. The name of Lindsey Carson appears upon the roll of old Fort Hempstead and the annals of old Fort Cooper"], Sabin, E., Kit Carson Days, p. 6
  9. ^ T. Dunlay, Kit Carson and the Indians, pp. 26-27
  10. ^ H. Sides, Blood and Thunder, p. 8.
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  12. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  13. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 

External links

  • Santa Fe Trail Research
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