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French Way

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Title: French Way  
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Subject: Camino de Santiago, Camino de Santiago (route descriptions), El Camino Real, Vía de la Plata, Santiago de Compostela Cathedral
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French Way

The four branches of the Way of St. James

The French Way (Galician: Camiño Francés, Spanish: Camino Francés) is the most popular of the routes of the Way of St. James (Spanish: Camino de Santiago), the ancient pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostela in Galicia, Spain. It runs from Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port on the French side of the Pyrenees to Roncesvalles on the Spanish side and then another 780km on to Santiago de Compostela through the major cities of Pamplona, Logroño, Burgos and León. A typical walk on the Camino Francés takes at least four weeks, allowing for one or two rest days on the way. Some travel the Camino on bicycle or on horseback.

Plaque on the street in Bordeaux, France marking the Way of St James

Paths from the cities of Tours, Vézelay, and Le Puy-en-Velay meet at Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port. A fourth French route originates in Arles, in Provence, and crosses the French–Spanish frontier at a different point, between the Pyrenees towns of Somport and Canfranc. This fourth route follows the Aragonese Way and joins the main Way of St. James at Puente la Reina, south of Pamplona, in Navarre, about 700 kilometres from Santiago de Compostela.

Example itinerary

Though there is no set route; daily stages from major town to major town could be walked

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