French legislative election, November 1946 (French Equatorial Africa)

In the November 1946 election to the French National Assembly, six parliamentarians were elected from French Equatorial Africa (AEF).[1]

Electorate and constituencies

The electorate of French Equatorial Africa was divided into two segments, one elected by common law citizens (first college, i.e. French citizens) and one elected by citizens of professional stature (second college, i.e. Africans who were 21 years and above, and qualified as a member of one of twelve specified categories; civil servants, notables, soldiers and veterans, heads of native collectivities, members of native courts, etc.). In total 110,029 persons were included in the second college, out of a population of 4.4 million.[1] In the Gabon-Moyen-Congo constituency, the first college had 2,805 registered voters.[2] In the Oubangui-Chari-Chad constituency, there were 1,807 registered voters in the first college.[3]

In neighbouring French West Africa the setting up of two separate electoral colleges had caused an uproar, there were generally few reactions from French Equatorial Africa. The Congolese member of the National Assembly, Jean-Félix Tchicaya, was the sole voice from the AEF to condemn the separate electoral college system during the debates in the National Assembly in the run-up to the elections.[1]

Two of the French Equatorial Africa seats were allotted to the first college (one seat shared by Gabon and Moyen-Congo, one shared by Oubangui-Chari and Chad) and four to the second college (one for each of the four territories). Electoral participation (amongst the second college) was 47.8% in Gabon, 64.5% in Chad, 67.7% in Moyen-Congo and 70.1% in Oubangui-Chari.[1]

Results

Jean-Félix Tchicaya (leader of the Congolese Progressive Party) was elected from Moyen-Congo and Jean-Hilaire Aubame was elected from Gabon.[4] Aubame got 7,069 votes, out of 12,528 votes cast.[5] Barthélemy Boganda of the Popular Republican Movement (MRP) was elected from Oubangui-Chari.[6]

For the Chad seat, there were four contestants; Gabriel Lisette of the United Movement of the French Resistance (elected with 7,268 votes, 41.30%), Guy de Boissoudy of the UDSR (6,788 votes, 38.57%), independent candidate Henri Montchamp (2,890 votes, 16.42%) and independent candidate Toura Gaba (651 votes, 3.70%).[7]

Maurice Bayrou was elected from the first college Moyen-Congo/Gabon seat. Bayrou contested the election as an 'independent socialist', supported by the local French administration. His main rival was the SFIO candidate Henri Seignon. Bayrou got 55.1% (around 1195 votes) of the votes and Seignon 39% (846 votes). After the elections, Bayrou joined the Gaullist Rally of the French People.[2][8] UDSR candidate René Malbrant won the Oubangui-Chari-Chad first college seat. He defeated independent candidate Pierre Plumeau with 1,003 votes against 192.[3]

Candidate Party Votes % Notes
First college (Moyen Congo-Gabon)
Maurice Bayrou Rally of the French People 1,195 58.5 Elected
Henri Seignon French Section of the Workers' International 846 41.5
Invalid/blank votes 126
Total 2,167 100
Registered voters/turnout 4,148 52.2
First college (Oubangui-Chari)
René Malbrant Democratic and Socialist Union of the Resistance 1,003 83.9 Elected
Pierre Plumeu Independent 192 16.1
Invalid/blank votes 33
Total 1,228 100
Registered voters/turnout 1,807 68.0
Second college (Moyen Congo)
Félix Tchicaya Congolese Progressive Party 8,635 63.6 Elected
Jacques Opangault French Section of the Workers' International 4,281 31.6
Charles Gougaud-d'Outremey Democratic and Socialist Union of the Resistance 654 4.8
Invalid/blank votes 2,082
Total 15,652 100
Registered voters/turnout 23,119 67.7
Second college (Gabon)
Jean-Hilaire Aubame French Section of the Workers' International 7,069 56.4 Elected
Emile Issembe 4,930 39.4
Jean-Rémy Ayoune Popular Republican Movement 301 2.4
Louis-Emile Bigmann 228 1.8
Invalid/blank votes 158
Total 12,686 100
Registered voters/turnout 26,530 47.8
Second college (Oubangui-Chari)
Barthélémy Boganda Popular Republican Movement 10,846 48.3 Elected
Tarquin 5,190 23.1
Jean-Baptiste Songo-Mali 4,801 21.4
François-Joseph Reste 1,607 7.2
Invalid/blank votes 505
Total 22,949 100
Registered voters/turnout 32,716 70.1
Source: Sternberger et al.[9][10]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Thompson, Virginia McLean, and Richard Adloff. The Emerging States of French Equatorial Africa. Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press, 1960. pp. 37-40
  2. ^ a b Bernault, Florence. Démocraties ambiguës en Afrique centrale: Congo-Brazzaville, Gabon, 1940-1965. Paris: Karthala, 1996. pp. 123-124
  3. ^ a b Lanne, Bernard. Histoire politique du Tchad de 1945 à 1958: administration, partis, élections. Paris: Éd. Karthala, 1998. p. 88
  4. ^ Bernault, Florence. Démocraties ambiguës en Afrique centrale: Congo-Brazzaville, Gabon, 1940-1965. Paris: Karthala, 1996. p. 106
  5. ^ "Biographies des députés de la IVe République: Jean-Hilaire Aubame", National Assembly of France (in Français), retrieved 2009-12-15 
  6. ^ "Biographies des députés de la IVe République: Barthélemy Boganda", National Assembly of France (in Français), retrieved 2009-12-15 
  7. ^ Lanne, Bernard. Histoire politique du Tchad de 1945 à 1958: administration, partis, élections. Paris: Éd. Karthala, 1998. p. 89
  8. ^ "Biographies des députés de la IVe République: Henri Seignon", National Assembly of France (in Français), retrieved 2009-12-15 
  9. ^ Sternberger, D, Vogel, B, Nohlen, D & Landfried, K (1978) Die Wahl der Parlamente: Band II: Afrika, Erster Halbband, pp711, 1048–1049
  10. ^ Sternberger, D, Vogel, B, Nohlen, D & Landfried, K (1978) Die Wahl der Parlamente: Band II: Afrika, Zweiter Halbband, p2465
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