World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Fritz Sauter

Article Id: WHEBN0010600606
Reproduction Date:

Title: Fritz Sauter  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Kernphysikalische Forschungsberichte, Werner Heisenberg, Spinor, Index of physics articles (F)
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Fritz Sauter

Fritz Sauter
Born 9 June 1906
Innsbruck, Austria-Hungary
Died 24 May 1983
Garmisch-Partenkirchen, West Germany
Residence Germany
Nationality Austrian
Fields Physicist
Institutions University of Munich
Technical University of Berlin
University of Königsberg
Alma mater University of Innsbruck
Doctoral advisor Arthur March
Other academic advisors Arnold Sommerfeld
Richard Becker
Doctoral students Herbert Kroemer
Friedrich Bopp
Gerhard Wolf

Fritz Eduard Josef Maria Sauter (German: ; 1906–1983) was an Austrian-German physicist who worked mostly in quantum electrodynamics and solid-state physics.

Education

From 1924 to 1928, Sauter studied mathematics and physics at the [2][3][4][5]

Career

From 1931 to 1934, Sauter was an assistant to Richard Becker at the Technische Hochschule Berlin (today Technische Universität Berlin) in Charlottenburg. From 1933, he was also a lecturer at Berlin. While at Berlin, he did work on atomic physics and Dirac’s theory of electrons.[2]

Privatdozent, was brought in to Göttingen as acting director of the Institute of Theoretical Physics and lecturer on theoretical physics; Born was officially retired under the Nuremberg Laws on 31 December 1935. Sauter continued in this role until 1936, when Becker was appointed director, after the Reichserziehungsministerium (Reich Education Ministry) eliminated his position at Berlin and reassigned him to Göttingen.[2][6]

After Göttingen, Sauter took a teaching assignment and became acting director of the theoretical physics department at the University of Königsberg. In 1939, he became ordinarius professor of theoretical physics and director of the theoretical physics department at Königsberg. From 1942 to 1945, Sauter was ordinarius professor of theoretical physics at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich.[2][7]

From 1950 to 1951, Sauter had a teaching assignment and was substitute director of the theoretical physics department at Technische Hochschule Hanover. From 1951 to 1952, he had a teaching assignment at Göttingen and Bamberg Universities. In 1952, he became ordinarius professor and director of the theoretical physics department at the University of Cologne, which he held until achieving emeritus status in 1971.[2]

Having been a student of Sommerfeld, Sauter was a superb mathematician.[5] He wrote his own book on differential equations of physics, and, after Sommerfeld’s death in 1951, Sauter was editor on the 4th, 5th, and 6th editions of Sommerfeld’s book on the same subject, and he was also editor of the four volume, collected works of Sommerfeld. Sauter was also editor of books by Becker, with whom he had been an assistant in Berlin.

Selected literature

  • Fritz Sauter Über das Verhalten eines Elektrons im homogenen elektrischen Feld nach der relativistischen Theorie Diracs, Zeitschrift für Physik 69 (11-12) 742-764 (1931). Author cited as being at Munich.
  • Fritz Sauter Über die Bremsstrahlung schneller Elektronen Annalen der Physik 412 (4) 404-412 (1934)

Books

  • Fritz Sauter Differentialgleichungen der Physik (de Gruyter, 1950, 1958, and 1966)
  • Arnold Sommerfeld, author and Fritz Sauter, editor Vorlesungen über theoretische Physik. Band 6: Partielle Differentialgleichungen der Physik. 4. Auflage, bearbeitet und ergänzt (Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft, 1958)
  • Arnold Sommerfeld, author and Fritz Sauter, editor Vorlesungen über theoretische Physik. Bd. 6. Partielle Differentialgleichungen der Physik. 5. Auflage, bearbeitet und ergänzt (Akademische Verl. Ges., 1962)
  • Arnold Sommerfeld, author and Fritz Sauter, editor Vorlesungen über theoretische Physik. Band 6: Partielle Differentialgleichungen der Physik. 5. Auflage, bearbeitet und ergänzt (Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft, 1962)
  • Richard Becker, author and Fritz Sauter, editor Theorie der Elektrizität. Bd. 1. Einführung in die Maxwellsche Theorie (Teubner, 1957, 1962, 1964, and 1969)
    • Richard Becker, author, Fritz Sauter, editor, and Ivor De Teissier, translator Electromagnetic Fields and Interactions, Volume I: Electromagnetic Theory and Relativity (Blaisdell, 1964)
  • Richard Becker, author and Fritz Sauter, editor Theorie der Elektrizität. Bd. 2. Einführung in die Quantentheorie der Atome und der Strahlung (Teubner, 1959, 1963, 1970, and 1997)
    • Richard Becker, author, Fritz Sauter, editor, and Ivor De Teissier, translator Electromagnetic Fields and Interactions, Volume II: Quantum Theory of Atoms and Radiation (Blaisdell, 1964)
  • Arnold Sommerfeld, author and Fritz Sauter, editor Vorlesungen über theoretische Physik. Band 6: Partielle Differentialgleichungen der Physik. 6. Auflage, bearbeitet und ergänzt (Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft, 1966)
  • Fritz Sauter, editor Arnold Sommerfeld: Gesammelte Schriften, 4 Volumes (Braunschweig, 1968)
  • Richard Becker, author and Fritz Sauter, editor Theorie der Elektrizität. Bd. 3. Elektrodynamik der Materie (Teubner, 1969)

Bibliography

  • Beyerchen, Alan D. Scientists Under Hitler: Politics and the Physics Community in the Third Reich (Yale, 1977) ISBN 0-300-01830-4
  • Hentschel, Klaus, editor and Ann M. Hentschel, editorial assistant and Translator Physics and National Socialism: An Anthology of Primary Sources (Birkhäuser, 1996) ISBN 0-8176-5312-0
  • Hoffmann, Dieter Between Autonomy and Accommodation: The German Physical Society during the Third Reich, Physics in Perspective 7(3) 293-329 (2005)

References

  1. ^ Sauter – Sommerfeld recommends Sauter to Max Born, 31 January 1931
  2. ^ a b c d e Hentschel, 1996, Appendix F; see the entry for Fritz Sauter.
  3. ^ Beyerchen, 1977, p. 181.
  4. ^ Sauter – Assistant to Sommerfeld, 1930
  5. ^ a b Kroemer – Nobel Prize Laureate
  6. ^ Beyerchen, 1977, pp. 38-39.
  7. ^ Hoffmann, 2005, p. 314.
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.