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Furazabol

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Furazabol

Furazabol
Skeletal formula of furazabol
Space-filling model of the furazabol molecule
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(1S,2S,10S,13R,14S,17S,18S)-2,17,18-Trimethyl-6-oxa-5,7-diazapentacyclo[11.7.0.02,10.04,8.014,18]icosa-4,7-dien-17-ol
Clinical data
Routes of
administration
Oral
Pharmacokinetic data
Biological half-life 4 hours
Excretion Urinary
Identifiers
CAS Registry Number  YesY
ATC code B
PubChem CID:
DrugBank  YesY
ChemSpider  YesY
UNII  YesY
Synonyms 17α-methyl-5α-androsta-2,3-furazan-17β-ol
Chemical data
Formula C20H30N2O2
Molecular mass 330.4694
 YesY   

Furazabol (Miotolan) is a derivative of the anabolic steroid stanozolol. It differs from stanozolol by having a furazan ring system in place of the pyrazole.[1] It has a c-17alpha methyl group, which allows it to be taken orally and causes hepatotoxicity in some individuals.

According to William Llewellyn, author of Anabolics 2007, the cholesterol-lowering effects of furazabol are a myth. In the 1970s, research studies showed that furazabol along with many other orally-active AAS like Anavar (oxandrolone) lowered total serum cholesterol. It was subsequently established that the cholesterol reduction from oral AAS was the result of suppressed HDL levels. As such, it would be expected that furazabol, like other oral anabolic steroids, while reducing total cholesterol levels would still adversely affect the HDL/LDL ratio and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

The Canadian sprinter Ben Johnson tested positive for stanozolol after winning the gold medal in the 100 meter sprint at the 1988 Summer Olympics. His doctor, Jamie Astaphan, maintains that his urine sample was sabotaged because Johnson was administered furazabol, which was not an IOC banned substance at the time. Subsequently, training partner and fellow Charlie Francis athlete Angela Issajenko (Taylor), in her book "Running Risks" outlined a theory stating Ben Johnson actually was using stanozolol. She substantiated this by stating that her supply of what she thought was furazabol was retested following the Dubin Inquiry and was found to be stanozolol, explaining the positive test.

References

  1. ^ US 3245988, "Steroid [2, 3-c] furazan compounds and the process for the production thereof" 


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