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Futurepop

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Title: Futurepop  
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Subject: The EPs (Apoptygma Berzerk), Electronic body music, Purity Ring, Power electronics (music), Witch house (music genre)
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Futurepop

Futurepop is an electronic dance music genre, an outgrowth of electronic body music, that evolved in the late 1990s. The term "futurepop" was coined by VNV Nation lead singer Ronan Harris to describe their sound at the time, and that of similar groups.[1]

As electronic body music began to decline in popularity, a more modern version of the genre began to emerge in its place in the late '90s. It features a danceable sound with heavy Synth pop influences, and has become popular mainly in alternative clubs throughout the world, particularly in Germany. Futurepop retains the apocalyptic worldview of EBM and Industrial (a more distant predecessor) but generally adds the more melodic elements of Synth pop and some Trance music influences. The progenitors of the genre are usually considered to be VNV Nation, Apoptygma Berzerk, Covenant and Assemblage 23. [2] [3]

Futurepop music is popular in the cyber youth culture and general alternative electronic music scenes. Music festivals that feature futurepop bands include Infest, Amphi festival, Wave Gotik Treffen and M'era Luna.

Artists

References

  1. ^ "Being a little bit productive". Sorted magAZine. 2002. 
  2. ^ "Assemblage 23 - I've never been fond of the 'future pop' moniker". Side-Line Magazine. 2009. 
  3. ^ a b Axel Schmidt, Klaus Neumann-Braun: Die Welt der Gothics – Spielräume düster konnotierter Transzendenz, page 276, 2004, ISBN 3-531-14353-0
  4. ^ Peter Matzke, Tobias Seeliger: Das Gothic- und Dark-Wave-Lexikon. Schwarzkopf und Schwarzkopf, Berlin 2003, ISBN 3-89602-277-6, page 166.
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