World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Garland, Nebraska

Article Id: WHEBN0000124209
Reproduction Date:

Title: Garland, Nebraska  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Seward County, Nebraska, Garland (disambiguation), Lincoln, Nebraska metropolitan area, Bee, Nebraska, Goehner, Nebraska
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Garland, Nebraska

Garland, Nebraska
Village
Downtown Garland
Downtown Garland
Location of Garland, Nebraska
Location of Garland, Nebraska
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Nebraska
County Seward
Area[1]
 • Total 0.17 sq mi (0.44 km2)
 • Land 0.17 sq mi (0.44 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,575 ft (480 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 216
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 216
 • Density 1,270.6/sq mi (490.6/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 68360
Area code(s) 402
FIPS code 31-18230[4]
GNIS feature ID 0829465[5]

Garland, formerly known as Germantown, is a village in Seward County, Nebraska, United States. It is part of the Lincoln, Nebraska Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 216 at the 2010 census.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
  • Demographics 3
    • 2010 census 3.1
    • 2000 census 3.2
  • Notable people 4
  • References 5

History

In 1874, the Midland Pacific Railroad built the first railway in Seward County, laying tracks from Lincoln to Seward.[6] To finance the construction of the new line, the railroad sought money from the county. However, the residents of the southern portion of the county voted overwhelmingly against the bond issue in an 1871 election: they were displeased at having been bypassed by an earlier railroad line, anticipated no benefits from the new line, and were angry with Seward, which had won the county seat away from the southern town of Milford. The failure of the bond issue forced the railroad to seek support from the northern portions of the county; so rather than following the desirable route up the valley of Middle Creek, the company agreed to build the line through Malcolm and then up into the hills of northeastern Seward County. This measure won enough support for the bonds to be approved in 1872.[7][8]

A depot was established on a level place along the line, and the town of Germantown, named for the ethnicity of the local settlers, was platted in 1874 by Hiland Fraisure.[6][9][10]

With the entry of the United States into World War I, anti-German sentiment was rampant. German-language newspapers were closed and German-language Lutheran church services were ended. Sauerkraut was dubbed "liberty cabbage", and dachshunds "liberty hounds".[11] In this environment, the Germantown city council decided that the name had to be changed; and they resolved to rename the town after the first local soldier to die during the war. Although several residents later fell by enemy action, the resolution had failed to specify the manner of death; so the honor went to Raymond Garland, who died of pneumonia before he ever reached France.[8] On December 11, 1918, a month after the signing of the Armistice, Germantown became Garland.[12]

Geography

Garland is located at (40.945501, -96.985926).[13]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.17 square miles (0.44 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 216 people, 91 households, and 58 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,270.6 inhabitants per square mile (490.6/km2). There were 97 housing units at an average density of 570.6 per square mile (220.3/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 98.6% White, 0.9% African American, and 0.5% Asian.

There were 91 households of which 26.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.1% were married couples living together, 4.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.3% were non-families. 29.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 3.02.

The median age in the village was 43 years. 21.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.6% were from 25 to 44; 27.2% were from 45 to 64; and 21.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 51.9% male and 48.1% female.

2000 census

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 247 people, 99 households, and 66 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,501.2 people per square mile (596.0/km²). There were 100 housing units at an average density of 607.8 per square mile (241.3/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 98.79% White, 0.81% from other races, and 0.40% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.62% of the population.

There were 99 households out of which 33.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.6% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.3% were non-families. 27.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the village the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 25.9% from 25 to 44, 26.3% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 111.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 114.5 males.

As of 2000 the median income for a household in the village was $45,469, and the median income for a family was $50,536. Males had a median income of $32,083 versus $24,063 for females. The per capita income for the village was $17,746. About 1.8% of families and 5.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.5% of those under the age of eighteen and none of those sixty five or over.

Notable people

Garland is the current residence of Poet Laureate Ted Kooser,[16] and the subject (among other aspects of rural life) of Kooser's book Local Wonders: Seasons in the Bohemian Alps.

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010".  
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  3. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  6. ^ a b "Seward County Nebraska Historic Buildings Survey". Nebraska State Historical Society. Retrieved 2011-10-27.
  7. ^ Waterman, John H. (1916). .General History of Seward County, Nebraska Online at Internet Archive. pp. 99-105. Retrieved 2011-10-27.
  8. ^ a b Gahm, Mary Lue. "Garland--Seward County". Nebraska... Our Towns. Retrieved 2011-10-27.
  9. ^ Fitzpatrick, Lilian Linder (1925). "Nebraska Place-Names". University of Nebraska Department of English. Retrieved 2011-10-27.
  10. ^ Waterman, John H. (1916). .General History of Seward County, Nebraska Online at Internet Archive. p. 79. Retrieved 2011-10-27.
  11. ^ "Over Here: World War I on the Home Front". Digital History. Retrieved 2011-10-27.
  12. ^ Murphy, D. "National Register of Historic Places Inventory--Nomination Form: Germantown State Bank Building". Nebraska State Historical Society. Retrieved 2011-10-27.
  13. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  14. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  15. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  16. ^ Various (14 April 2011). Good Poems, American Places. Penguin Group US. p. 237.  
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.