World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Gayaza High School

Article Id: WHEBN0022386422
Reproduction Date:

Title: Gayaza High School  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Wakiso District, Jane Musoke-Nteyafas, Education in Uganda, Julia Sebutinde, Maria Kiwanuka
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Gayaza High School

Gayaza High School
Location
Gayaza, Wakiso District, Uganda
Information
Type Public Middle School and High School
Motto Never Give Up
Established 1905
Faculty 67
Number of students 1,100
Athletics Major sports: Cricket, Track, Netball, Volleyball, Lawn Tennis, Table Tennis, Hockey.
Website

Gayaza High School is an all-girls boarding school covering grades 8 -13 in Uganda. It is the oldest girls' school in the country.[1]

Location

The school is located in the town of Gayaza, in Wakiso District, approximately 20 kilometres (12 mi) northeast of Kampala, Uganda's capital and largest city.[2] The school grounds cover an area of 140 acres (57 ha) on a hilltop, running roughly south to north. It is bounded on the north by Makerere University Farm at Kabanyolo and on the west by smallholdings and the Gayaza - Namulonge road. The area between the school farm and the road from Kampala to Kalagi, Mukono, Uganda comprises a swamp and more smallholdings. Gayaza High School lies immediately north of a small settlement known as Gayaza Market. At this point, the main road from Kampala forks; one road leading to Kalagi in Mukono District and the other to Namulonge Agricultural and Animal Research Institute (NAARI), and on to Zirobwe. The lane between them leading up to the school, past the primary day schools and the parish church, is a cul de sac, which accounts for the school's relative security in times of trouble. The coordinates of the school are:0°27'36.0"N, 32°36'39.0"E (Latitude:0.460000; Longitude:32.610833).[3]

History

Christian missionaries belonging to the Church Missionary Society of England founded Gayaza High School in January 1905 with four students. By July 1905, the number of students had grown to 43. The land was donated to the Church by Kabaka Daudi Cwa II.

The purpose was to train girls, especially the daughters of chiefs of the Kingdom of Buganda, in those skills that would make them better wives. This was the only basis of security approval from the traditional and traditionalist leaders of that time. The founders however had a different motive: to educate girls based on a strong Christian foundation. They realized that the best way of entrenching Christianity was by having Christian mothers under whom children spent all their formative years.

In the beginning, the curriculum included agriculture, handiwork, child-care and needlework, as well as scripture, reading, writing, arithmetic and geography. Academic excellence and social excellence are traditions in Gayaza High School. It is therefore not surprising that the school is one of the most sought after high schools in Uganda. In 2009, Gayaza High School was selected as the 68th best high school in Africa.[4]

Originally, any girl, as long as she was a daughter of a chief in the Buganda Kingdom, was admitted to Gayaza. Later, even those from rich families were able to enter the school. Eventually the system changed further so that one had to pass both their oral and written examinations to get into Gayaza. Today this is still the practice.

Student residences

The student dormitories are named after prominent Ugandans or after past administrators at the school:

  • Corby House
  • Hutchinson House
  • Kennedy House
  • Cox House
  • Sherborne House
  • Mary Stuart House
  • Ham & Apollo House
  • Apollo Kivebulaya House
  • Rhoda Nsibambi House

The last house is named after the late Rhoda Nsibambi, former wife to the immediate past Prime Minister of Uganda, Apollo Nsibambi. She was an alumnus. Ham & Apollo House is named after Ham Mukasa and Apollo Kaggwa. Kennedy House was named after John F. Kennedy.

Hutchinson House

Its located in the middle of the school and was first built by Lena and Joseph Hutchison . Its is the second largest house after Rhoda Nsibambi. It has been good in sports for the past few years.

Notable alumni

See also

References

  1. ^ Musasizi, Simon (1 June 2011). "Cover Story: Gayaza Old Girls Colourfully Honour Their Mentor".  
  2. ^ "Travel Distance Between Gayaza And Kampala With Map". Globefeed.com. Retrieved 21 July 2014. 
  3. ^ Google, . "Location of Gayaza High School At Google Maps".  
  4. ^ "100 Best Secondary Schools In Africa". NairaLand.Com. 2 April 2009. Retrieved 21 July 2014. 
  5. ^ Ssemakula, Mukasa E. "The Nkima (Monkey) Clan". Retrieved 18 August 2011. 

External links

  • Overview of Gayaza High School In June 2012

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.