World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Gelato

Gelato
Type Ice cream
Place of origin Sicily, Italy
Serving temperature Cold
Main ingredients Milk, cream, sugar, flavoring ingredient (e.g. – fruit or nut puree)
Cookbook: Gelato 

Gelato (Italian pronunciation: ; plural: gelati ) is the Italian word for "ice cream", derived from the Latin word gelātus (meaning "frozen"). In English this word commonly refers to varieties of ice cream made in a traditional Italian style. Gelato can be made with milk, cream, various sugars, and flavoring such as fresh fruit and nut purees. It is generally lower in calories, fat and sugar than other styles of ice cream.[1]

Gelato is a type of soft ice cream containing a relatively small amount of air.[2] By statute, gelato in Italy must have at least 3.5% butterfat, with no upper limit established.

The sugar content in homemade gelato, as in other styles of ice cream, is balanced with the water content to act as an anti-freeze to prevent it from freezing solid. Types of sugar used include sucrose, dextrose, and inverted sugar to control apparent sweetness. Typically, gelato—like any other ice cream—needs a stabilizing base. Egg yolks are used in yellow custard-based gelato flavors, including zabaione and creme caramel, and non-fat milk solids are also added to gelato to stabilize the base. Starches and gums, especially corn starch, are sometimes also used to thicken and stabilize the mix.

In the United States, there is no standard of definition for gelato set forth by the United States Food and Drug Administration, as there is for ice cream.[3] Whereas ice cream in the U.S. is defined by the Federal Code both by its ingredients, which includes milk fat (also known as butterfat) of 10% or more, gelato in the U.S. covers a wide range of products including frozen desserts eaten like ice cream; products that are identical to ice cream with the exception of their butterfat contents; and premium ice cream containing butterfat far exceeding the minimums set forth in Italy.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Production 2
  • See also 3
  • Notes 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

History

The history of gelato dates back to frozen desserts in Sicily, ancient Rome and Egypt made from snow and ice brought down from mountaintops and preserved below ground. Later, in 1686 the Sicilian fisherman Francesco Procopio dei Coltelli perfected the first ice cream machine.[4] However, the popularity of gelato among larger shares of the population only increased in the 1920s–1930s in the northern Italian city of Varese, where the first gelato cart was developed. Italy is the only country where the market share of handmade gelato versus industrial one is over 55%.[5][6] Today, more than 5,000 modern Italian ice cream parlors employ over 15,000 people, mostly Italians.[7]

Production

Gelato in Florence, Italy

The mixture for gelato is typically prepared using a hot process first, where the sugars need to dissolve. White base is heated to 85 °C (185 °F) completing a pasteurization program. The hot process to make chocolate gelato is essentially the same for conventional ice cream, and depending on recipes, it is meant to be traditionally flavored with cocoa powder and cocoa butter.

See also

  • Stracciatella
  • Frozen custard, a frozen dessert made with cream and eggs
  • Italian ice, a frozen dessert made from either concentrated syrup flavoring or fruit purees.
  • Semifreddo, a class of semi-frozen dessert
  • Granita, a semi-frozen dessert made from sugar, water and various flavorings.
  • Frozen yogurt, the cultured, frozen milk product, with a tart flavor

Notes

  1. ^ "Nutritious facts on gelato compared to ice cream".  
  2. ^ Ferrari, p. 21
  3. ^ "CFR - Code of Federal Regulations Title 21". Accessdata.fda.gov. Retrieved 2012-09-10. 
  4. ^ Storia del gelato. Interfred.it. Retrieved on 2012-07-06.
  5. ^ See italiangelato.info
  6. ^ See gelatoartigianale.it
  7. ^ See guide.supereva.it, outside of Italy the bigger number of gelaterie is located in UK, France, Germany and north Europe in general.

References

  • Ferrari, Luciano (2005). Gelato and Gourmet Frozen Desserts - A professional learning guide. Lulu.com.  

External links

  • Italian Gelato Flavors Decoded
  • Irish Examiner article
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.