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General Motors Diesel Division

 

General Motors Diesel Division

General Motors Diesel Division
Subsidiary of General Motors
Industry Engineering
Fate

Split and sold

  • Engine division became Detroit Diesel and sold to DaimlerChrysler
  • Locomotive division, Electro-Motive Diesel sold to private investors (now owned by Progress Rail Services Corporation)
  • Transit bus division sold to MCI and TMC (now Nova Bus)
Defunct 2005
Headquarters Detroit, Michigan
London, Ontario
Saint-Eustache, Quebec
, United States, Canada
Products Diesel engines, Locomotives, Buses
Parent General Motors

General Motors Diesel Division was a unit of General Motors founded in 1938.[1] GMDD's Canadian operations were renamed as Diesel Division of General Motors of Canada Limited in 1975.

The company was a manufacturer of diesel engines, diesel locomotives, transit buses and military vehicles.

The engine making unit later became Detroit Diesel and sold to DaimlerChrysler AG in 2000[1] (formerly part of General Motors Diesel). The locomotive unit (Electro Motive Diesel) was acquired by private investors, the transit bus divisions were purchased by TMC in the U.S. and MCI in Canada (the latter entities were sold to form Nova Bus in 1993), and the GM Defense unit was purchased by General Dynamics.[2]

Contents

  • Products 1
    • Buses 1.1
    • Locomotives 1.2
  • Facilities 2
  • References 3
  • See also 4

Products

Buses

Under the brands GM Coach and GMC.

GM bus, made in the late 50's, still working in Conchillas, Uruguay (2011).
Model Length Notes
HR150G-T6H5307N-T9 40 foot electric trolley bus (with BBC Brown Boveri & Company Limited power traction system)
4104 35 foot intercity bus 6-71 diesel engine emergency door at rear of left side A/C used auxiliary gasoline engine
4106 35 foot intercity bus 8V-71 diesel engine no auxiliary engine for A/C
4107 35 foot GM Buffalo bus intercity bus 8V-71 diesel engine called a Buffalo because of its appearance
4108 35 foot GM Buffalo bus intercity bus 8V-71 diesel engine short version of a 4905
4501 40 foot Greyhound Scenicruiser intercity bus 2x4V-71 diesel engines, later replaced by 1x8V-71, three-axle, two-level
4905 40 foot GM Buffalo bus intercity bus 8V-71 diesel engine Long wheelbase
TDH 4517 40 foot GM New Look (Fishbowl) Bus diesel bus
GM PD-4103 35 foot
PD-4104 35 foot
TDH 5301 40 foot GM New Look (Fishbowl) Bus diesel bus
TDH 5302 40 foot GM New Look (Fishbowl) Bus diesel bus
TDH 5303 40 foot GM New Look (Fishbowl) Bus diesel bus
TDH 5304 40 foot GM New Look (Fishbowl) Bus diesel bus
T6H 5305 40 foot GM New Look (Fishbowl) Bus diesel bus
T6H 5307N 40 foot GM New Look (Fishbowl) Bus diesel bus
TA60-102N 60 foot articulated diesel bus used New Look back end with the front face of the bus using the Classic design
TC40-102A/N 40 foot Classic (transit bus) - later produced by Motor Coach Industries, Nova Bus, TMC and now Dupon Trolley Industries
TC60-102N 60 foot Classic (transit bus) articulated diesel bus based on TA60-102N - later produced by Nova Bus
RTS 40 foot diesel buses - later produced by Nova Bus and TMC
Titan 30 foot Metro X - continued as Chevy Titan II

TDH-3301 and "Truck and Coach" belong in here some where

Locomotives

Facilities

Location Years Production Notes
London, Ontario 1962–1979 Buses; shared location with locomotive plant (under Electro Motive Division of GM) Sold to General Dynamics
Saint-Eustache, Quebec 1979–1987 Final assembly plant for buses sold in Quebec Sold to Motor Coach Industries
Saint-Laurent, Quebec 1974–1979 Final assembly plant for buses sold in Quebec Plant closed and moved to Saint-Eustache (now Nova Bus plant)
Detroit, Michigan ?-1977 Buses and locomotives Bus plant closed 1977 and continued to produce light trucks until 2009

References

  1. ^ a b Bill Bowman, "Detroit Diesel Division", history.gmheritagecenter.com 
  2. ^ Neville Britto (24 February 2012), "Canadians gearing up to derail CAT, literally!", logospathosethos.com 

See also

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