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German submarine U-32 (1937)

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Title: German submarine U-32 (1937)  
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Subject: List of shipwrecks in September 1940, List of shipwrecks in June 1940, List of shipwrecks in October 1940, RMS Empress of Britain (1930), List of shipwrecks in August 1940
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German submarine U-32 (1937)

Pre-war photograph of U-32. Note the boat's number on the conning tower which was erased on the commencement of hostilities
History
Nazi Germany
Name: U-32
Ordered: 1 April 1935
Builder: DeSchiMAG AG Weser, Bremen
Cost: 4,189,000 Reichsmark
Yard number: 913
Laid down: 15 March 1936
Launched: 25 February 1937
Commissioned: 15 April 1937
Fate: Sunk, 30 October 1940
General characteristics [1]
Class & type: Type VIIA submarine
Displacement:
  • 626 tonnes (616 long tons) surfaced
  • 745 t (733 long tons) submerged
Length:
  • 64.51 m (211 ft 8 in) o/a
  • 45.50 m (149 ft 3 in) pressure hull
Beam:
  • 5.85 m (19 ft 2 in) o/a
  • 4.70 m (15 ft 5 in) pressure hull
Height: 9.50 m (31 ft 2 in)
Draft: 4.37 m (14 ft 4 in)
Installed power:
  • 2,100–2,310 PS (1,540–1,700 kW; 2,070–2,280 bhp) (diesels)
  • 750 PS (550 kW; 740 shp) (electric)
Propulsion:
Range:
  • 6,200 nmi (11,500 km; 7,100 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) surfaced
  • 73–94 nmi (135–174 km; 84–108 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
Test depth:
  • 220 m (720 ft)
  • Crush depth: 230–250 m (750–820 ft)
Complement: 4 officers, 40–56 enlisted
Sensors and
processing systems:
Gruppenhorchgerät
Armament:
Service record[2][3]
Part of:
Identification codes: M 00 459
Commanders:
Operations:
  • Nine:
  • 1st patrol: 27 August – 1 September 1939
  • 2nd patrol: 5–30 September 1939
  • 3rd patrol: 28 December 1939 – 22 January 1940
  • 4th patrol: 26 February – 23 March 1940
  • 5th patrol: 8–14 May 1940
  • 6th patrol: 3 June – 1 July 1940
  • 7th patrol: 15 August – 8 September 1940
  • 8th patrol: 18 September – 6 October 1940
  • 9th patrol: 24–30 October 1940
Victories:
  • 20 commercial ships sunk (116,836 GRT)
  • four commercial ships damaged (32,274 GRT)
  • one warship damaged (8,000 GRT)

German submarine U-32 was a Type VIIA U-boat of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

Her keel was laid down on 15 March 1936 by DeSchiMAG AG Weser of Bremen as yard number 913. She was launched on 25 February 1937 and commissioned on 15 April with Kapitänleutnant (Kptlt.) Werner Lott in command. On 15 August 1937, Lott was relieved by Korvettenkapitän (K.Kapt.) Paul Büchel and on 12 February 1940 Oberleutnant zur See (Oblt.z.S.) Hans Jenisch took over, he was in charge of the boat until her loss.[2]

Contents

  • Design 1
  • Service history 2
  • Fate 3
    • Wolfpacks 3.1
  • Summary of raiding history 4
  • References 5
  • Bibliography 6
  • External links 7

Design

As one of the first ten German Type VII submarines later designated as Type VIIA submarines, U-32 had a displacement of 626 tonnes (616 long tons) when at the surface and 745 tonnes (733 long tons) while submerged.[4] It had a total length of 64.51 m (211 ft 8 in), a pressure hull length of 45.50 m (149 ft 3 in), a beam of 5.85 m (19 ft 2 in), a height of 9.50 m (31 ft 2 in), and a draught of 4.37 m (14 ft 4 in). The submarine was powered by two MAN M 6 V 40/46 four-stroke, six-cylinder diesel engines producing a total of 2,100 to 2,310 metric horsepower (1,540 to 1,700 kW; 2,070 to 2,280 shp) for use while surfaced, two BBC GG UB 720/8 double-acting electric motors producing a total of 750 shaft horsepower (760 PS; 560 kW) for use while submerged. It had two shafts and two 1.23 m (4 ft) propellers. It was capable of operating at depths of up to 230 metres (750 ft).[4]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 17 knots (31 km/h; 20 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph).[4] When submerged, it could operate for 73–94 nautical miles (135–174 km; 84–108 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph); when surfaced, it could travel 6,200 nautical miles (11,500 km; 7,100 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph). U-32 was fitted with five 53.3 cm (21 in) torpedo tubes (four fitted at its bow and one at its stern), eleven torpedoes, one 8.8 cm (3.46 in) SK C/35 naval gun, 220 rounds, and an anti-aircraft gun. It had a complement of between forty-four and sixty.[4]

Service history

U-32 conducted nine patrols, sinking 20 ships, for a total of 116,836 gross register tons (GRT) and damaging five more, totalling 40,274 GRT. On 28 October 1940 U-32, under the command of Hans Jenisch, sank the 42,348-ton liner Empress of Britain, which had been previously damaged by German bombs. Empress was the largest ship sunk by a U-boat.[2]

Fate

U-32 was sunk northwest of Ireland, in position , by depth charges from the British destroyers Harvester and Highlander on 30 October 1940. Nine of her crew members' lives were ended by the sinking, 33 survived and were taken prisoner, including Jenisch, who spent six and a half years in British captivity before returning to Germany in June 1947.[2][5]

Wolfpacks

U-32 took part in one wolfpack, namely.

  • Prien (12–17 June 1940)

Summary of raiding history

Date Name of Ship Nationality Tonnage Fate[6]
18 September 1939 Kensington Court  United Kingdom 4,863 Sunk
28 September 1939 Jern  Norway 875 Sunk
5 October 1939 Marwarri  United Kingdom 8,063 Damaged (mine)
6 October 1939 Lochgoil  United Kingdom 9,462 Damaged (mine)
31 December 1939 Luna  Norway 959 Sunk
2 March 1940 Lagaholm  Sweden 2,818 Sunk
18 June 1940 Altair  Norway 1,522 Sunk
18 June 1940 Nuevo Ons  Spain 108 Sunk
18 June 1940 Sálvora  Spain 108 Sunk
19 June 1940 Labud  Yugoslavia 5,334 Sunk
22 June 1940 Eli Knudsen  Norway 9,026 Sunk
30 August 1940 Chelsea  United Kingdom 4,804 Sunk
30 August 1940 Mill Hill  United Kingdom 4,318 Sunk
30 August 1940 Norne  Norway 3,971 Sunk
1 September 1940 HMS Fiji  Royal Navy 8,000 Damaged
22 September 1940 Collegian  United Kingdom 7,886 Damaged
25 September 1940 Mabriton  United Kingdom 6,694 Sunk
26 September 1940 Corrientes  United Kingdom 6,863 Damaged
26 September 1940 Darcoila  United Kingdom 4,084 Sunk
26 September 1940 Tancred  Norway 6,094 Sunk
28 September 1940 Empire Ocelot  United Kingdom 5,759 Sunk
29 September 1940 Bassa  United Kingdom 5,267 Sunk
30 September 1940 Haulerwijk  Netherlands 3,278 Sunk
2 October 1940 Kayeson  United Kingdom 4,606 Sunk
28 October 1940 Empress of Britain  United Kingdom 42,348 Sunk

References

  1. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Type VIIA". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 30 June 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d Helgason, Guðmundur. "The Type VIIA boat U-32". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 2009-12-19. 
  3. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "War Patrols by German U-boat U-32". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 2009-12-19. 
  4. ^ a b c d Gröner 1985, pp. 71, 74.
  5. ^ Kemp 1997, p. 67.
  6. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Ships hit by U-32". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 20 October 2014. 

Bibliography

  • Busch, Rainer; Röll, Hans-Joachim (1999). Deutsche U-Boot-Verluste von September 1939 bis Mai 1945. Der U-Boot-Krieg (in German) IV (Hamburg, Berlin, Bonn: Mittler).  
  • Edwards, Bernard (1996). Dönitz and the Wolf Packs - The U-boats at War. Cassell Military Classics. pp. 29, 32.  
  • Gröner, Erich (1985). U-Boote, Hilfskreuzer, Minenschiffe, Netzleger, Sperrbrecher. Die deutschen Kriegsschiffe 1815-1945 (in German) III (Koblenz:  
  • Kemp, Paul (1999). U-Boats Destroyed - German Submarine Losses in the World Wars. London: Arms & Armour.  
  • Pickford, Nigel (1999). Lost Treasure Ships of the Twentieth Century. National Geographic Society.  

External links

  • Helgason, Guðmundur. "The Type VII boat U-32". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 8 December 2014. 
  • Hofmann, Markus. "U 32". Deutsche U-Boote 1935-1945 - u-boot-archiv.de (in German). Retrieved 7 December 2014. 
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