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Getabako

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Getabako

A getabako in the bath house of Kobe, Japan.

A getabako (下駄箱) is a Japanese shoe cupboard, usually situated in the genkan, an entryway or porch of the house. In Japan, it is considered uncouth to not remove one's shoes before entering the house.[1][2] Near the getabako is a slipper rack,[3] and most people in Japan wear slippers around the house, except for rooms which have tatami flooring as they are bad for the floor. The getabako is usually made of wood and bamboo, and there are many sold all over the world.

The word getabako is originated from 下駄 (geta - a type of Japanese footwear) + 箱 (hako - box).[4]

Usually there are big getabako in schools and kindergartens, and each student has his own section. Sometimes students store personal things there, or use them to leave love letters.[1][5][6]

References

  1. ^ a b Removing Shoes // Japanese Culture and Daily Life, The Japan Forum. Originally, The Japan Forum Newsletter no8 "A day in The Life" June 1997.
  2. ^ Getabako: Let’s get some shoes // Corey Klassen, Feb 28, 2011
  3. ^ Japanese social organization, University of Hawaii Press, 1992, ISBN 0824813863, page 117
  4. ^ Japanese Morphophonemics: Markedness and Word Structure, page 231: "Undergoer: hako, Compound: geta-bako, Gloss: clog-box, shoe rack, chest for footwear"
  5. ^ http://japanesense.wordpress.com/2012/11/11/a-glimpse-of-japanese-schools-life-part-2/
  6. ^ Removing shoes // A day with Kentaro, The Japan Forum

Sources

  • Removing Shoes // Japanese Culture and Daily Life, The Japan Forum. Originally, The Japan Forum Newsletter no8 "A day in The Life" June 1997.
  • Japanese social organization, University of Hawaii Press, 1992, ISBN 0824813863, page 117


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