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Giancarlo De Carlo

Giancarlo De Carlo in the 1950s

Giancarlo De Carlo (12 December 1919 − 4 June 2005) was an Italian architect.

He was born in Genoa, Liguria, in 1919. He trained as an architect from 1942 to 1949, a time of political turmoil which generated his philosophy toward life and architecture. Libertarian socialism was the underlying force for all of his planning and design.

De Carlo saw architecture as a consensus-based activity. His designs are generated as an expression of the forces that operate in a given context including human, physical, cultural, and, historical forces. His ideas linked CIAM ideals with late twentieth century reality.

De Carlo was a member of Team 10 along with Alison and Peter Smithson, Aldo van Eyck, and Jacob Bakema, among others. Although his political beliefs have limited his portfolio of buildings, his ideas remained untainted by postmodernist beliefs through his journal Spazio e Società - Space & Society, and his teaching at the International Laboratory of Architecture and Urban Design (ILAUD).

De Carlo died in Milan in 2005.

Further reading

  • Benedict Zucchi (1992) Giancarlo De Carlo, Oxford: Butterworth Architecture ISBN 978-0-7506-1275-3
  • John McKean 'Il Magistero: De Carlo's dialogue with historical forms', Places (California/Cambridge Mass) Vol 16, No 1, Fall 2003 ISSN 07310455
  • John McKean, Giancarlo De Carlo, Layered Places, Stuttgart and Paris (2004), published in English by Menges (Stuttgart) and in French by Centre Pompidou as "Giancarlo De Carlo: Des Lieux, Des Hommes". ISBN 978-3-932565-12-0
  • John McKean, “Giancarlo De Carlo et l’experience politique de la participation”, in 'La Modernite Critique, autour du CIAM 9, d’Aix-en-Provence – 1953', ed. Bonillo, Massu & Pinson, Marseille: editions Imberton, 2006

External links

  • [2] Faculty of Architecture, Università di Roma3. Students workshop and exhibition "Giancarlo De Carlo, Partigiano dell'Architettura" (Italian)
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