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Glenn M. Anderson

Glenn M. Anderson
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California's 32nd district
In office
January 3, 1975 – January 3, 1993
Preceded by Craig Hosmer
Succeeded by Julian C. Dixon
Chairman of House Transportation Committee
In office
January 3, 1988 – January 3, 1991
Preceded by James J. Howard
Succeeded by Robert A. Roe
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California's 35th district
In office
January 3, 1973 – January 3, 1975
Preceded by John G. Schmitz
Succeeded by James F. Lloyd
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California's 17th district
In office
January 3, 1969 – January 3, 1973
Preceded by Cecil R. King
Succeeded by Pete McCloskey
37th Lieutenant Governor of California
In office
January 5, 1959 – January 2, 1967
Governor Pat Brown
Preceded by Harold J. Powers
Succeeded by Robert Finch
Member of the California State Assembly
from the ? district
In office
1943–1951
Mayor of Hawthorne
In office
1940–1943
Personal details
Born (1913-02-21)February 21, 1913
Hawthorne, California, U.S.
Died December 13, 1994(1994-12-13) (aged 81)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Resting place Green Hills Memorial Park
Rancho Palos Verdes, California, U.S.
Political party Democratic
Alma mater University of California, Los Angeles (B.A.)

Glenn Malcolm Anderson (February 21, 1913 – December 13, 1994) was an American politician. He was the 37th Lieutenant Governor of California and later as congressman. He was a member of the Democratic Party.[1]

Anderson was born on February 21, 1913 in Hawthorne, California. He received a Bachelor of Arts from University of California, Los Angeles in 1936. He worked as a real estate developer and served in the United States Army.

Anderson was mayor of Hawthorne, California from 1940 to 1943 and a member of the California State Assembly from 1943 to 1951. He served as Lieutenant Governor of California from 1959 to 1967 but was defeated in a bid for a third term by Republican Robert Finch. During his office on August 13, 1965, he signed off on the orders to send 1,336 National Guard Troops into Los Angeles County, 48 hours after the Watts riots begun.

Anderson was first elected to the 91st Congress in 1968 and served 12 terms from 1969 to 1993. In Congress he became chair of the Committee on Public Works and Transportation. He decided not to run for re-election in 1992.

Anderson died on December 13, 1994[1] in Los Angeles, California, at the age of 81. He is interred in Green Hills Memorial Park, Rancho Palos Verdes, California.

The Interstate 105 in South Los Angeles is named in his honor as the "Glenn M. Anderson Freeway" but that name is rarely used. It is known colloquially as "the Century" or "the 105" freeway.

References

  1. ^ a b "Anderson, Glenn Malcolm". Who Was Who in America, 1993-1996, vol. 11. New Providence, N.J.: Marquis Who's Who. 1996. p. 6.  

External links

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Cecil R. King
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California's 17th congressional district

January 3, 1969 – January 3, 1973
Succeeded by
Pete McCloskey
Preceded by
John G. Schmitz
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California's 35th congressional district

January 3, 1973 – January 3, 1975
Succeeded by
James F. Lloyd
Preceded by
Craig Hosmer
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California's 32nd congressional district

January 3, 1975 – January 3, 1993
Succeeded by
Julian C. Dixon
Political offices
Preceded by
Harold J. Powers
Lieutenant Governor of California
January 5, 1959 – January 2, 1967
Succeeded by
Robert Finch
Preceded by
James J. Howard
New Jersey
Chairman of House Transportation Committee
January 3, 1988 – January 3, 1991
Succeeded by
Robert A. Roe
New Jersey
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