World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Glove (ice hockey)

Article Id: WHEBN0001220453
Reproduction Date:

Title: Glove (ice hockey)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Infobox ice hockey player/testcases, Ann-Renée Desbiens, Boris Amromin, Christopher Heino-Lindberg, Olivier Anken
Collection: Gloves, Ice Hockey Equipment, Safety Clothing
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Glove (ice hockey)

A player's gloved hands.

There are three styles of gloves worn by ice hockey players. Skaters wear similar gloves on each hand, while goaltenders wear gloves of different types on each hand.

Contents

  • Types of gloves 1
    • Skaters' gloves 1.1
    • Goaltender's gloves 1.2
  • References 2

Types of gloves

Skaters' gloves

Skaters gloves help prevent the hands getting bruised and battered and stops them from getting burned from the ice. The top padding and shell thumb is designed to help protect the player from flying Hockey pucks and opponents' Ice hockey sticks.

In today's hockey game, gloves will generally fall into two types of categories, the first being the traditional four-roll style. These types of gloves have more room on the inside, giving it a looser feel on the hand than the natural fit gloves. Hockey players who choose the four-roll style have less resistance in their fingers and hands, so wearing the gloves feels less noticeable. The other category of gloves are the tighter fitting, natural or anatomical fit glove. These have a much tighter fit than the four-roll gloves, and are designed to become an extension of the players' hand. The tapered gloves are tight on the hand, but ergonomically designed for better wrist mobility and rang of motion. Hockey gloves also range in sizes, and are generally available in three categories: Youth size hockey gloves run 8", 9"and 10"; Junior sizes are 11" and 12"; and Senior sizes run 13", 14" and 15".[1]

Goaltender's gloves

Goaltenders wear a different type of glove on each hand. While these gloves do offer the goaltender a measure of protection, their design is to aid the goaltender in performance of his duties. On the hand with which he carries his stick, often called the "stick hand," the goaltender wears a blocker with a large pad across the back of the forearm, usually extending just beyond the wrist. National Hockey League rules mandate that the blocking glove may be no wider than eight inches and no longer than fifteen. The goaltender uses this blocker to deflect shots.

On the other hand, often called the "glove hand", the goaltender wears a catching glove called a trapper, which is similar to a baseball glove. In addition to using it to catch shots, goaltenders can distribute caught pucks by tossing them from the catching glove. National Hockey League rules limit the perimeter of the catching glove to forty-five inches and the widest part of the glove may not exceed eighteen inches.

References

  1. ^ "Pure Hockey Equipment Guide". 
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.