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Godstow Bridge

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Title: Godstow Bridge  
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Subject: The Trout Inn, Bridges completed in 1792, Bridges in Oxfordshire, Bridges across the River Thames, Godstow
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Godstow Bridge

Godstow Bridge
Coordinates
Carries minor road
Crosses River Thames
Locale Godstow, Oxfordshire
Maintained by Oxfordshire County Council
Heritage status Grade II listed building
Characteristics
Design arch
Material stone
Height 8 feet 5 inches (2.57 m)
Number of spans 2

Godstow Bridge is a road bridge across the River Thames in England at Godstow near Oxford. The bridge is just upstream of Godstow Lock on the reach to King's Lock and carries a minor road between Wolvercote and Wytham.

The bridge is in two parts. The older part crosses the original course of the river and weir stream near The Trout Inn, a well-known public house. This stone bridge was in existence in 1692 and was probably the one held by the Royalists against Parliamentarians in 1645. It has two arches, one being pointed and the other rounded. The newer part was built across the new lock cut in 1792.[1] This has two round arches of brick and was rebuilt in 1892. The North arch dates from medieval times. The Bridge is a Grade II Listed Building.[2]

The importance of the bridge was reduced by the construction of the Oxford By-pass and the A34 Bridge a short distance upstream.

See also

References

  1. ^ Thacker, Fred. S. (1968) [1920]. The Thames Highway: Volume II Locks and Weirs. Newton Abbot: David and Charles. p. not cited. 
  2. ^ Images of England #245454
Next crossing upstream River Thames Next crossing downstream
A34 Road Bridge (road) Godstow Bridge Medley Footbridge (pedestrian)
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