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Gordon Gollob

Gordon Gollob
The head a man, shown from the front. He wears a military uniform, a white shirt with an Iron Cross displayed at the front of his shirt collar. His hair appears dark and is combed back, his facial expression is a determined; his eyes are looking into the camera.
Gordon Gollob in October 1941
Born (1912-06-16)16 June 1912
Vienna, Austria
Died 8 September 1987(1987-09-08) (aged 75)
Sulingen, Germany
Buried at Sulingen, Village cemetery
Allegiance First Austrian Republic (to 1938)
 Nazi Germany
Service/branch Luftwaffe
Years of service 1933–45
Rank Oberst (Colonel)
Unit ZG 76, JG 3, JG 54, JG 77, Luftflotte 5
Commands held II./JG 3, JG 77, Jafü 5 and General der Jagdflieger
Battles/wars

World War II

Awards Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds
Other work

Gordon Mac Gollob (16 June 1912 – 8 September 1987) was an Austrian-born German Luftwaffe military aviator during World War II, a fighter ace credited with 150 enemy aircraft shot down in over 340 combat missions. He claimed the majority of his victories over the Eastern Front, and six over the Western Front, including five as a Messerschmitt Bf 110 heavy fighter pilot.

Born in Vienna, Gollob volunteered for military service in the Austrian Bundesheer (Austrian Armed Forces) in 1933. In March 1938, following the Anschluss, the forced incorporation of Austria by Nazi Germany, Gollob was transferred to the Luftwaffe. In 1939, Gollob was posted to Zerstörergeschwader 76 (ZG 76—76th Destroyer Wing), a twin-engined heavy fighter wing. Following the outbreak of World War II, he claimed his first aerial victory on 5 September 1939 during the Invasion of Poland. Gollob claimed one victory during the Battle of the Heligoland Bight and two victories during the Norwegian Campaign. He then transferred to Jagdgeschwader 3 (JG 3—3rd Fighter Wing), flying the single-engined Messerschmitt Bf 109. In the aftermath of the Battle of Britain on the Channel Front, he claimed his sixth and final victory on the Western Front.

Gollob then fought in the aerial battles of Gruppe (2nd group) of JG 3. He claimed 18 aerial victories in August and following his 42nd victory was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross on 18 September. He claimed 37 victories in October, including nine on 18 October and six on 22 October. On 26 October 1941, his total then at 85 aerial victories, he was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. In December 1941, Gollob was temporarily transferred to the Erprobungstelle Rechlin, the Luftwaffe test facility at Rechlin. Following a commander-in-training assignment to the Stabsschwarm (headquarters unit) of Jagdgeschwader 54 (JG 54—54th Fighter Wing) on 13 March 1942, Gollob was appointed Geschwaderkommodore of Jagdgeschwader 77 (JG 77—77th Fighter Wing) on 16 May 1942. He claimed his 100th victory on 20 May and on 23 June, he was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords on 23 June following his 107th aerial victory. On 29 August, Gollob became the first fighter pilot to claim 150 enemy aircraft destroyed and was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds the next day. At the time of its presentation to Gollob it was Germany's highest military decoration.[Note 1]

In fear of him being killed in action, Gollob was prohibited to fly further combat mission. On 15 October 1942, he was appointed Jagdfliegerführer 3 on the Western Front and Jagdfliegerführer 5 on 6 September 1943, responsible for the tactical fighter command of northwestern France. In April 1944, he was transferred to the staff of the General der Jagdflieger (General of Fighters). In January 1945, he succeeded Generalleutnant (Lieutenant General) Adolf Galland as General der Jagdflieger, a position he held until the end of hostilities. Following World War II, he became General Secretary of the Federation of Independents (Verband der Unabhängigen) in Austria. He then worked in a sales position for the Klöckner Humboldt Deutz AG. Gollob, married and father of three children, died on 7 September 1987 at Sulingen, Germany.

Contents

  • Early life and career 1
  • World War II 2
    • Norwegian Campaign and Battle of Britain 2.1
    • War against the Soviet Union 2.2
    • Wing Commander 2.3
    • High command 2.4
    • Controversy 2.5
  • Later life 3
  • Aerial victory credits 4
  • Awards 5
    • Wehrmachtbericht references 5.1
  • Notes 6
  • References 7
    • Citations 7.1
    • Bibliography 7.2
  • External links 8

Early life and career

Gollob was born on 16 June 1912 in Vienna, the capital of Austria-Hungary.[2] His parents were artists, his father, Heinrich Gollob, worked as an academic painter. His mother, Johanna née Reininghaus, was the daughter of Zoe von Karajan, wife of Carl Reininghaus. Gollob was the first of five children. Both his parents had studied at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, there they mutually befriended Gordon Mallet McCouch, an American artist of Scottish descent. McCouch was his godfather and the namesake for his first and middle name Gordon Mac.[3][4] Already in his youth, Gollob wanted to become an engineer and pilot. In 1930, as a student of an Oberrealschule, a secondary school, he built his first primary glider in Tirol, experimenting with it at the old airfield at Innsbruck. He also completed his A and B-license to fly glider aircraft and became an instructor as well as a construction and airframe inspector.[2]

Main building of the Theresian Military Academy

Following four semesters of Staffel (3rd squadron) of Zerstörergeschwader 76 (ZG 76—76th Destroyer Wing) flying the Messerschmitt Bf 110 twin-engined heavy fighter.[6][Note 2]

World War II

World War II in Europe began on Friday, 1 September 1939, when German forces Gruppe of ZG 76 first relocated to the Stuttgart area on 29 September 1939 to defend the western border against the French and British, who had been at war with Germany since 3 September 1939.[8] From early October to middle December I. Gruppe operated from a number of airfields in the Stuttgart and Ruhr region before relocating north to Jever on 16 December 1939.[9] There on 18 December 1939, Gollob claimed his second aerial victory over a Royal Air Force (RAF) Vickers Wellington bomber in what became to be known as the Battle of the Heligoland Bight.[2] During the battle, he shot down and killed Squadron Leader Archibald Guthrie, of No. 9 Squadron.[10]

Norwegian Campaign and Battle of Britain

On 8 April 1940, Gollob was appointed Staffelkapitän (squadron leader) of 3. Staffel of ZG 76.[6] The unit took part in Operation Weserübung, Germany's assault on Denmark and Norway in the opening operation of the Norwegian Campaign. In June 1940, I. Gruppe was based at Trondheim-Værnes, the Allied expeditionary force composed of British, French, and Free Polish, were being evacuated from Narvik. In support of the evacuation, the RAF was targeted German shipping in Norwegian waters and Luftwaffe occupied airfields along the coast. On 13 June, a flight of fifteen Blackburn Skua dive bombers, six from 800 Naval Air Squadron and nine from 803 Naval Air Squadron, launched from the Royal Navy aircraft carrier Ark Royal attempted to attack the battleship Scharnhorst in the Trondheimsfjord. The flight was intercepted by the Luftwaffe, in the resulting aerial encounter, eight Skuas were shot down, the first by Gollob.[11][12] That day, he was awarded the Iron Cross 1st Class (Eisernes Kreuz erster Klasse).[2]

Gollob then received night fighter training.[6] At the time, he made a few technical improvement recommendations for the Messerschmitt Bf 109 single-engined fighter. Based on these recommendations, he was transferred to the Erprobungstelle Rechlin, the Luftwaffe test facility at Rechlin in June 1940.[2] At 14:47 on 9 July 1940, Gollob intercepted and shot down Short Sunderland flying boat "Y" (N6133) from No. 201 Squadron. The Sunderland, piloted by Flight Lieutenant J.D. Middleton, was on patrol off Norway and crashed 90 miles (140 km) southwest of Sumburgh Head.[Note 3] That same day at 17:20, Gollob, together with Oberfeldwebel (Staff Sergeant) Herbert Schob and Oberleutnant Gerhard Böhmel, shot down a patrolling Lockheed Hudson reconnaissance aircraft "J" (N7377) from No. 233 Squadron off Shetland.[14][Note 4]

On 7 September 1940 during the Battle of Britain, Gollob was transferred to the Gruppenstab (headquarters unit) of II. Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 3 (JG 3—3rd Fighter Wing) based at Arques in northern France. Four days after the loss of 4. Staffel StaffelkapitänOberleutnant Werner Voigt was shot down over England and taken prisoner of war—on 8 October 1940, Gollob took command of 4. Staffel in his place.[15] In February 1941, the entire II. Gruppe returned to Germany for a period of rest. The pilots went on a ski vacation in Kitzbühl from 9 to 28 March 1941. 4. Staffel was housed at the foot of the Ehrenbachhöhe, the highest point of the Hahnenkamm. The Gruppe then reassembled at Darmstadt-Griesheim where they received a complement of the then new Bf 109 F-2 fighter aircraft. On 25 April 1941, II. Gruppe began relocating back to the English Channel Front at Monchy-Breton. Relocation completed on 4 May and the first mission was flown on 7 May 1941. That day, the RAF flew several fighter sweeps over the French coast and Gollob was credited with shooting down a Supermarine Spitfire fighter, his sixth overall and last on the Western Front.[16] On 1 June 1941, Gollob was promoted to Hauptmann (captain) and II. Gruppe began its relocation east. The ground elements moved immediately while the air elements followed on 8 June. On that day, they flew to Saint-Dizier and then to Böblingen. On the following day, they continued to Breslau-Gandau, present day the Wrocław–Copernicus Airport in Poland, via Straubing.[17]

War against the Soviet Union

Map indicating Operation Barbarossa's attack plan

In preparation of Operation Barbarossa, the German invasion of the Soviet Union, II. Gruppe headed further east on 18 June. Following a stopover at Kraków, the unit was moved to Hostynne. At the start of the campaign, JG 3 under the command of Major (Major) Günther Lützow was subordinated to the V. Fliegerkorps (5th Air Corps), under command of General der Flieger Robert Ritter von Greim, which was part of Luftflotte 4 (4th Air Fleet), under command of Generaloberst Alexander Löhr. These air elements supported Generalfeldmarschall Gerd von Rundstedt's Heeresgruppe Süd (Army Group South), with the objective to capture the Ukraine and its capital Kiev. At 17:00 on 21 June 1941, V. Fliegerkorps, based at Lipsko, briefed the various unit commanders of the upcoming attack. That evening, Hauptmann Lothar Keller, Gruppenkommandeur (group commander) of II. Gruppe, informed the Staffelkapitäne.[18]

The invasion of the Soviet Union began on 22 June 1941. II. Gruppe flew its first missions on the Eastern Front shortly before 4:00, flying low attacks against Soviet airfields in the vicinity of Lvov, present-day Lviv in the Ukraine. At 6:30 the Gruppe fought its first aerial battles. 4. Staffel claimed three victories and the Gruppenstab four.[18] One of these victories was credited to Gollob, who claimed a Polikarpov I-16 fighter shot down at 7:00.[19] On 25 June, II. Gruppe claimed 17 victories, 6 of which were credited to 4. Staffel. The Staffel engaged Ilyushin DB-3 bomber escorted by I-16 Ratas on a free chase mission west of Lutsk. The Soviet bombers targeted the German advance roads form Hrubieszów through Volodymyr-Volynskyi to Lusk. Gollob was credited with two victories over DB-3s in this encounter.[20] On 26 June 1941, Gruppenkommandeur Keller was killed in a mid-air collision. The next day, Gollop succeeded Keller in this position and turned over command of 4. Staffel to Oberleutnant Karl Faust.[21] In the beginning of July 1941 the front in the vicinity of the northern sector of Heeresgruppe Süd came increasingly into movement. This necessitated relocation of II. Gruppe to Volodymyr-Volynskyi. By this time the war of attrition had worn down the Gruppe authorized strength by 50%. The reason for this was the almost complete lack of new aircraft or of engines and other spare parts. Another factor was overwork of the ground crews and signs of exhaustion were apparent. Flying combat air patrols over Berdychiv and Zhytomyr on 1 July, II. Gruppe claimed four victories.[22] On this day at 19:42, Gollob claimed his tenth aerial victory over a Petlyakov Pe-2 light bomber.[23] The following day, the Gruppe claimed 23 aerial victories for the loss of one in combat.[24] The first victory of the day was claimed by Gollob who shot down a ZKB-19—a German alias for the Polikarpov I-17 fighter, possibly a misidentified Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-1 or Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-3—at 5:52 in the morning. On another mission that day he claimed two Vultee V-11 attack aircraft shot down at 11:30 and 11:43.[23]

The rapid advance of German ground forces required II. Gruppe to relocate to Lutsk on 5 July, then to Dubno that same evening and to Miropol on 10 July. Flying missions east of Zhytomyr, Gollob claimed his 14th victory over a Polikarpov I-153 at 6:30 on 13 July 1941.[25] A victory over a DB-3 at 11:42 and a further victory over a Tupolev SB-2 bomber at 11:44, both claimed on 16 July, took his total to 16 aerial victories.[26] On 20 July 1941, II. Gruppe relocated from Miropol to Berdychiv.[27] One day later, Gollob was awarded the Honor Goblet of the Luftwaffe (Ehrenpokal der Luftwaffe) for 16 aerial victories.[2] On 23 July 1941 at 16:35, Gollob claimed a Polikarpov R-5 reconnaissance bomber, his 17th aerial victory.[28] That day, II. Gruppe received orders to turn over its remaining aircraft to I. Gruppe of Jagdgeschwader 53 (JG 53—53rd Fighter Wing). Gordon's Gruppe was reequipped with the Bf 109 F-4. On 28 July, the pilots were flown to Krosno on a Junkers Ju 52 where they received a full complement of Bf 109 F-4s. After a single familiarization flight, they departed to Berdychiv and on the following morning they were transferred to Bila Tserkva.[27]

Gollob and Graf von Kageneck received the Oak Leaves from Hitler.

On 21 August 1941, II. Gruppe claimed 17 victories, five of which by Gollob. This "ace-in-a-day" achievement, his first of six during his combat career, took his total to 33 aerial victories.[29] On 18 September, he was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross (Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes) for 42 victories. In October 1941, he claimed 37 aerial victories, including nine in one day on 18 October, five one day later, and again five on 22 October. On 25 October 1941, he was also honorably mentioned in the Wehrmachtbericht radio report, the first of three such mentions. The following day, he was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves (Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub) after reaching 85 victories. He was the 38th member of the German armed forces to be so honored. Gollob, together with Oberleutnant Erbo Graf von Kageneck, received the Oak Leaves from Adolf Hitler personally at the Wolf's Lair, Hitler's headquarters in Rastenburg, present-day Kętrzyn in Poland, on 5 November 1941.[30]

On 31 October 1941, II. Gruppe flew its last combat missions over the northern Crimea. The Gruppe was then ordered to return to Germany at the Wiesbaden-Erbenheim airfield where it arrived in early November. Prior to departure, all of the remaining aircraft where handed over to III. Gruppe of Jagdgeschwader 77 (JG 77—77th Fighter Wing). Since the start of Operation Barbarossa on 22 June 1941, II. Gruppe had claimed 504 aerial victories for the loss of ten pilots killed in action or missing in action, further nine pilots were injured. In addition, 27 aircraft were lost or damaged beyond repair, further 21 aircraft received heavy damaged and another 27 were lightly damaged.[31] On 20 November 1941, Gollob was again posted to the test facility Erprobungstelle Rechlin. Gollob was replaced by Hauptmann Karl-Heinz Krahl replaced Gollob as commander of II. Gruppe of JG 3.[32] At Rechlin, he flew numerous test and comparison flight's with the latest version of the Bf 109 and Focke-Wulf Fw 190 fighter aircraft, as well as a variety of types which never went beyond a prototype variant.[2]

Wing Commander

In early 1942, the General der Jagdflieger (General of Fighters), Oberst (Colonel) Adolf Galland recommended Gollob for the Geschwaderkommodore (wing commander) position of JG 77. Subsequently Gollob was sent to the Geschwaderstab (headquarters unit) of Jagdgeschwader 54 (JG 54—54th Fighter Wing) as a commander-in-training under Major Hannes Trautloft. On 1 May 1942, Gollob was officially appointed Geschwaderkommodore of JG 77, replacing Major Gotthard Handrick. He operationally took command of the Geschwader after he arrived on 16 May 1942.[33][34] On the same day of his arrival, Gollob flew his first combat mission as Geschwaderkommodore. That day, he claimed his aerial victories 87 to 89, shooting down three Lavochkin-Gorbunov-Gudkov LaGG-3 fighter aircraft.[35] On 1 July 1942, he was promoted to Major.[2]

red heart in black square
Herzas (Ace of Hearts) emblem of JG 77

JG 77 was given the task of supporting the hard fighting in the Crimean Campaign over the Kerch Strait on the Crimean Peninsula. JG 77, led by such experts as Gollob and Heinrich Bär leading I./JG 77, "took over" the air space over the Kerch-Taman area. Intense rivalry ensued between Gollob and Bär, each striving to outperform the other.

An anonymous JG 77 pilot described Gollob's methods; "Gollob flew from Kerch together with his wingman. They positioned themselves at a low altitude beneath a Soviet formation. Then they started climbing in spirals, carefully maintaining their position beneath the enemy formation. Before the peacefully flying Soviets had even suspected any mischief, the two planes at the bottom of their formation had been shot down and the two Germans were gone." On 18 May 1942, Gollob claimed his 94th to 96th aerial victory over Kerch and the Caucasus coast, all three were Polikarpov R-5 reconnaissance bombers.[36]

On 20 May 1942, Gollob reached victory number 100. He was the 10th Luftwaffe pilot to achieve the century mark.[37] On 23 June he was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern), after his tally had increased to 107. Only two months later he reached 150 victories, becoming the Luftwaffe's highest scoring pilot at that point. For this he was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds (Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub, Schwertern und Brillanten) on 29 August. Gollob was the third member of the Wehrmacht and the third fighter pilot who had received this award.

High command

On 1 October 1942, Gollob was posted to the staff of Jagdfliegerführer 3 [Note 5] on the Channel Front. Gollob was promoted to Oberstleutnant (lieutenant colonel) on 20 April 1943, effective as of 1 April, and to Oberst (colonel) on 1 May 1944. On 15 October, he was appointed Jagdfliegerführer 5, being responsible for the tactical fighter command over northwestern France.

In April 1944 Gollob was transferred to the personal staff of General der Jagdflieger Adolf Galland, to advise on the development of the jet aircraft projects. However, he had a falling out with Galland in September, and was transferred to Kommando der Erprobungstellen, or HQ of test units. He was also involved in the development and testing of the Neptun "J" airborn radar and air-to-air rockets, such as the R4M. In November 1944, Gollob was appointed commander of the Jäger-Sonderstab - or special fighter command - for the Ardennes offensive. In January 1945, on the recommendation of Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler to Hitler, Gollob was appointed General der Jagerflieger, following Galland's sacking by the OKL: Oberkommando der Luftwaffe (air force high command) after the costly Operation Bodenplatte.

Controversy

Gollob was an ardent Nazi, and was often thought of poorly by his fellow pilots. Johannes Steinhoff said about Gollob in an interview first printed in World War II Magazine in February 2000:

"Well, I will say this, then I will say nothing else about Gollob. Losses soared under his leadership everywhere he went, much like Göring in the first war. He placed leaders in command of units not because of their competence, but due to their loyalty to the Nazi Party, which were very few in the Jagdwaffe."[38]

Gollob was regarded as a competent pilot, but a poor leader due to his eagerness to impress superiors and his unhealthy competitive spirit.

Later life

After being released from captivity following the surrender, Gollob made a living as a contributor to aircraft magazines and lecturing. In 1948 he became General Secretary of the Federation of Independents (VDU—Verband der Unabhängigen) in Austria. In 1950, the VDU dismissed Gollob from the party following the internal strife between the more liberal approach of the founders Herbert Kraus and Viktor Reimann and the German nationalist faction centering around Gollob.[39]

From 1951 he started working for the Klöckner Humboldt Deutz AG, a company making motors and vehicles, in a sales position. He and his wife Elisabeth Lüning, married on 14 February 1943, and had two sons and a daughter. Their first son, Ulrik, was born on 30 November 1943 in Kitzbühl, their second son, Gerald was born on 9 January 1946 also in Kitzbühl, and their daughter Cornelia born 16 March 1954 in Sulingen. Gollob died in Sulingen, Diepholz, Lower Saxony on 7 September 1987.[40]

Aerial victory credits

Gollob was credited with 150 aerial victories claimed in 340 combat missions, 144 of which were on the Eastern Front. He never lost a wingman in combat, nor was he shot down.[41]

      This and the ♠ (Ace of spades) indicates those aerial victories which made Gollob an "ace-in-a-day", a term which designates a fighter pilot who has shot down five or more airplanes in a single day.

Chronicle of aerial victories
Victory Date Time Type Victory Date Time Type
– 3. Staffel of Zerstörergeschwader 76 –
1 5 September 1939
PWS 56 4 9 July 1940 14:47 Sunderland
2 18 December 1939 14:45 Wellington 5 9 July 1940 17:20 Hudson
3 13 June 1940 2:00 Skua
– 4. Staffel of Jagdgeschwader 3 –[42]
6 7 May 1941 11:25 Spitfire 8 25 June 1941 9:00 DB-3
7 22 June 1941 7:00 I-16 9 25 June 1941 9:10 DB-3
– Stab II. Gruppe of Jagdgeschwader 3 –[43]
10 1 July 1941 19:42 Pe-2 48♠ 28 September 1941
MiG-3
11 2 July 1941 5:42 ZKB-19 49 4 October 1941 10:20 Il-2
12 2 July 1941 11:30 V-11 50 5 October 1941 12:25 MiG-3
13 2 July 1941 11:43 V-11 51 5 October 1941 12:26 MiG-3
14 13 July 1941 6:30 I-153 52 6 October 1941 10:15 Pe-2
15 16 July 1941 11:42 DB-3 53 6 October 1941 12:15 Pe-2
16 16 July 1941 11:44 SB-2 54 7 October 1941 9:40 Pe-2
17 23 July 1941 16:35 R-5 55 7 October 1941 12:40 Pe-2
18 25 July 1941
DB-3 56 7 October 1941
Il-2
19 5 August 1941 17:46 I-153 57 10 October 1941 12:40 MiG-3
20 5 August 1941 18:22 I-17 58 10 October 1941 12:43 MiG-3
21 8 August 1941 13:17 DB-3 59 17 October 1941 9:04 MiG-3
22 8 August 1941 13:32 DB-3 60 17 October 1941 9:15 I-16
23 9 August 1941 10:55 DB-3 61 17 October 1941 16:05 MiG-3
24 11 August 1941 18:45 Bomber 62♠ 18 October 1941 7:18 MiG-3
25 12 August 1941 7:20 I-17 63♠ 18 October 1941 7:20 MiG-3
26 12 August 1941 7:25 SB-3 64♠ 18 October 1941 10:05 MiG-3
27 20 August 1941 17:45 I-16 65♠ 18 October 1941 10:07 MiG-3
28 20 August 1941 17:47 DB-3 66♠ 18 October 1941 10:19 MiG-3
29♠ 21 August 1941 9:10 I-26 67♠ 18 October 1941 10:20 MiG-3
30♠ 21 August 1941 11:06 R-5 68♠ 18 October 1941 10:29 MiG-3
31♠ 21 August 1941 11:09 R-5 69♠ 18 October 1941 14:46 MiG-3
32♠ 21 August 1941 12:00 DB-3 70♠ 18 October 1941 14:48 MiG-3
33♠ 21 August 1941 17:05 I-26 71♠ 19 October 1941 8:55 MiG-3
34 22 August 1941 6:10 I-17 72♠ 19 October 1941 12:36 Pe-2
35 24 August 1941 9:00 I-180 73♠ 19 October 1941 12:37 Pe-2
36 31 August 1941 9:08 TB-3 74♠ 19 October 1941 12:42 Pe-2
37 8 September 1941 15:43 I-26 75♠ 19 October 1941 15:35 MiG-3
38 9 September 1941 16:50 Il-2 76 20 October 1941 11:07 MiG-3
39 12 September 1941 15:52 Il-2 77♠ 22 October 1941 6:55 I-16
40 12 September 1941 17:15 I-26 78♠ 22 October 1941 7:20 Pe-2
41 13 September 1941 17:19 Il-2 79♠ 22 October 1941 10:21 I-16
42 14 September 1941 5:47 I-153 80♠ 22 October 1941 10:22 I-16
43 19 September 1941 13:55 R-5 81♠ 22 October 1941
MiG-3
44♠ 28 September 1941 12:20 Pe-2 82 23 October 1941 10:55 MiG-3
45♠ 28 September 1941 12:21 Pe-2 83 23 October 1941 10:58 MiG-3
46♠ 28 September 1941 14:46 Pe-2 84 23 October 1941 11:40 MiG-3
47♠ 28 September 1941
MiG-3 85 24 October 1941 13:50 I-153
– Stab of Jagdgeschwader 54 –
86
– Stab of Jagdgeschwader 77 –[44]
87 16 May 1942
LaGG-3 119 14 August 1942
LaGG-3
88 16 May 1942
LaGG-3 120 14 August 1942
LaGG-3
89 16 May 1942
LaGG-3 121♠ 16 August 1942
LaGG-3
90 17 May 1942
R-5 122♠ 16 August 1942
LaGG-3
91 17 May 1942
R-5 123♠ 16 August 1942
Il-2
92 17 May 1942
R-5 124♠ 16 August 1942
I-16
93 17 May 1942
LaGG-3 125♠ 16 August 1942
I-16
94 18 May 1942
R-5 126 17 August 1942
LaGG-3
95 18 May 1942
R-5 127 17 August 1942
LaGG-3
96 18 May 1942
R-5 128 18 August 1942
I-16
97 19 May 1942
R-5 129 18 August 1942
I-16
98 19 May 1942
R-5 130 18 August 1942
I-16
99 19 May 1942
R-5 131 19 August 1942
Il-2
100 20 May 1942
Il-2 132 19 August 1942
Il-2
101 20 May 1942
LaGG-3 133 19 August 1942
I-153
102 7 June 1942
LaGG-3 134 20 August 1942
I-16
103 9 June 1942
I-153 135 20 August 1942
I-153
104 18 June 1942
Il-2 136 20 August 1942
I-153
105 18 June 1942
LaGG-3 137 22 August 1942
Boston
106 21 June 1942
LaGG-3 138 22 August 1942
Boston
107 21 June 1942
LaGG-3 139 24 August 1942
LaGG-3
108 26 July 1942
I-16 140 24 August 1942
LaGG-3
109 27 July 1942
I-153 141 24 August 1942
LaGG-3
110 27 July 1942
I-153 142 24 August 1942
Boston
111 4 August 1942
Yak-1 143 25 August 1942
Boston
112 6 August 1942
Il-2 144 26 August 1942
Pe-2
113 6 August 1942
Yak-1 145 27 August 1942
I-16
114 6 August 1942
Il-2 146 28 August 1942
Boston
115 6 August 1942
R-5 147 29 August 1942
LaGG-3
116 7 August 1942
Yak-1 148 29 August 1942
LaGG-3
117 8 August 1942
Yak-1 149 29 August 1942
LaGG-3
118 14 August 1942
Boston 150 29 August 1942
Pe-2

Awards

Wehrmachtbericht references

Date Original German Wehrmachtbericht wording Direct English translation
Saturday 25 October 1941 Hauptmann Gollob errang am 20 Oktober seinen 30.[sic], Major Lützow am 24 Oktober seinen 101. Luftsieg.[59] Hauptmann Gollob achieved on 20 October his 30th, Major Lützow on 24 October his 101st aerial victory.
Saturday 20 June 1942 Hauptmann Gollob, Kommodore eines Jagdgeschwaders, errang seinen 101. Luftsieg.[60] Hauptmann Gollob, commander of a fighter wing, achieved his 101st aerial victory.
Monday 31 August 1942 Am 29. August errang Major Gollob, Kommodore eines Jagdgeschwaders, an der Ostfront seinen 150. Luftsieg.[61] Major Gollob, commander of a fighter wing, on 29 August achieved on the Eastern Front his 150th aerial victory.

Notes

  1. ^ In 1942, the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds was second only to the Grand Cross of the Iron Cross (Großkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes), which was awarded only to senior commanders for winning a major battle or campaign, in the military order of the Third Reich. The Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds as the highest military order was surpassed on 29 December 1944 by the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Golden Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds (Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Goldenem Eichenlaub, Schwertern und Brillanten).[1]
  2. ^ For an explanation of Luftwaffe unit designations see during World War IILuftwaffeOrganization of the .
  3. ^ According to Donnelly, the Sunderland was shot down by Böhmel.[13]
  4. ^ According to Donnelly, the Hudson was shot down by Schob.[13]
  5. ^ A Jagdfliegerführer, or Jafü, was the commander of the Jagdwaffe (fighter force) of a Luftflotte.
  6. ^ According to German author Veit Scherzer on 25 October 1941.[49]

References

Citations

  1. ^ Williamson & Bujeiro 2004, pp. 3, 7.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Stockert 2010, p. 38.
  3. ^ Nekolar 1996, pp. 4–11.
  4. ^ Fraschka 1994, p. 40.
  5. ^ Feist & McGuirl 2014, p. 144.
  6. ^ a b c d Obermaier 1989, p. 19.
  7. ^ Fraschka 1994, p. 41.
  8. ^ Hinchliffe 2003, p. 42.
  9. ^ Hinchliffe 2003, p. 46.
  10. ^ Holmes 2009, pp. 76–77.
  11. ^ Weal 2012, pp. 29–30.
  12. ^ Rossiter 2007, pp.
  13. ^ a b Donnelly 2004, p. 27.
  14. ^ Shores, Foreman & Ehrengardt 1992, p. 352.
  15. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, pp. 26, 29.
  16. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, pp. 66–67.
  17. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, p. 67.
  18. ^ a b Prien & Stemmer 2003, p. 70.
  19. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, p. 330.
  20. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, pp. 72, 371.
  21. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, p. 73.
  22. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, pp. 73–74.
  23. ^ a b Prien & Stemmer 2003, p. 371.
  24. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, p. 74.
  25. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, pp. 74, 372.
  26. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, pp. 372–373.
  27. ^ a b Prien & Stemmer 2003, p. 76.
  28. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, p. 373.
  29. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, pp. 77, 374.
  30. ^ Stockert 1996, pp. 213, 218.
  31. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, pp. 81–82.
  32. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, pp. 102, 328.
  33. ^ Bergström & Mikhailov 2001, p. 159.
  34. ^ Prien 1993, p. 982.
  35. ^ Prien 1993, p. 1010.
  36. ^ Prien 1993, p. 1018.
  37. ^ Obermaier 1989, p. 243.
  38. ^
  39. ^
  40. ^ Nekolar 1996, pp. 11–13.
  41. ^ Stockert 1996, p. 215.
  42. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, pp. 370–371.
  43. ^ Prien & Stemmer 2003, pp. 371–377.
  44. ^ Prien 1995, pp. 2406, 2408–2409, 2419–2420.
  45. ^ a b Thomas 1997, p. 208.
  46. ^
  47. ^
  48. ^ Berger 1999, p. 86.
  49. ^ a b c d Scherzer 2007, p. 341.
  50. ^ Fellgiebel 2000, p. 199.
  51. ^ Von Seemen 1976, p. 143.
  52. ^ Fellgiebel 2000, p. 55.
  53. ^ Von Seemen 1976, p. 26.
  54. ^ Fellgiebel 2000, p. 40.
  55. ^ Von Seemen 1976, p. 14.
  56. ^ Fellgiebel 2000, p. 36.
  57. ^ Von Seemen 1976, p. 12.
  58. ^
  59. ^ Die Wehrmachtberichte 1939–1945 Band 1, p. 708.
  60. ^ Die Wehrmachtberichte 1939–1945 Band 2, p. 168.
  61. ^ Die Wehrmachtberichte 1939–1945 Band 2, p. 268.

Bibliography

External links

Military offices
Preceded by
Major Gotthard Handrick
Commander of Jagdgeschwader 77 Herz As
16 May 1942 – 30 September 1942
Succeeded by
Major Joachim Müncheberg
Preceded by
Major Karl Hentschel
Commander of Jagdfliegerführer 3
15 October 1942 – 6 September 1943
Succeeded by
Jagdfliegerführer 5
Preceded by
Jagdfliegerführer 3
Commander of Jagdfliegerführer 5
6 September 1943 – May 1944
Succeeded by
unknown
Preceded by
Generalleutnant Adolf Galland
General der Jagdflieger
31 January 1945 – 8 May 1945
Succeeded by
none


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