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Grant Parish, Louisiana

Grant Parish, Louisiana
The Grant Parish Courthouse in Colfax
Map of Louisiana highlighting Grant Parish
Location in the state of Louisiana
Map of the United States highlighting Louisiana
Louisiana's location in the U.S.
Founded 1869
Named for Ulysses S. Grant
Seat Colfax
Largest town Colfax
Area
 • Total 665 sq mi (1,722 km2)
 • Land 643 sq mi (1,665 km2)
 • Water 22 sq mi (57 km2), 3.3%
Population
 • (2010) 22,309
 • Density 35/sq mi (14/km²)
Congressional district 5th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
The Grant Parish Library is located near the courthouse.
The Grant Parish Sheriff's Office is located behind the courthouse.
Colfax Reunion Nursing and Rehabilitation Home at 366 Webb Smith Drive in Colfax serves all of Grant Parish.

Grant Parish (French: Paroisse de Grant) is a parish located in the north central portion of the U.S. state of Louisiana. As of the 2010 census, the population was 20,309.[1] The parish seat is Colfax[2] (pronounced CAHL-facks). The parish was founded in 1869.[3]

Grant Parish is part of the Alexandria, LA Metropolitan Statistical Area and Red River Valley. From 1940-1960, the parish had a dramatic population loss, as many African Americans left in the Great Migration to seek better opportunities elsewhere. Such migration continued until about 1970. The parish was also one of the eleven Reconstruction parishes created, created from Winn and Rapides parishes.

Contents

  • History 1
    • Population and politics 1.1
  • Geography 2
    • Major highways 2.1
    • Adjacent parishes 2.2
    • National protected area 2.3
  • Demographics 3
  • Government and infrastructure 4
  • Education 5
  • National Guard 6
  • Communities 7
    • Towns 7.1
    • Villages 7.2
  • Prison 8
  • Notable people 9
  • See also 10
  • References 11

History

Grant Parish was originally a part of the more populous Rapides Parish to the south. Prior to the American Civil War, the center of activity focused upon "Calhoun's Landing," named for the cotton and sugar planter Meredith Calhoun, a native of South Carolina. Calhoun also published the former National Democrat newspaper in what became Colfax, the seat of government of the new parish.[4]

Grant was one of several new parishes created by the Reconstruction legislature in an attempt to build the Republican Party. Founded in 1869, it had a slight majority of freedmen. It was named for U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant.[5] The parish seat of Colfax was named for Grant's first vice president, Schuyler M. Colfax (pronounced COAL-facks) of Indiana. However, the town of Colfax is pronounced CAHL-facks. The parish encompassed both cotton plantations and pinewoods. It was one of several areas along the Red River that had considerable violence during Reconstruction, as whites tried to maintain social control.

The gubernatorial election of 1872 was disputed, leading to both parties' certifying their slates of local officers. The election was finally settled in favor of the Republican candidates, but the decision was disputed in certain areas. As social tensions rose, Republican officials took their places at the courthouse in Colfax. They were defended by freedmen and state militia (mostly made up of freedmen), who feared a Colfax Massacre. The total number of freedmen deaths were never established because some of the bodies were thrown into the river and woods.

The white militia was led by disfranchised most blacks, a situation that persisted until after the Civil Rights-era legislation of the mid-1960s.

Population and politics

Grant Parish had the highest growth rate in central Louisiana in the five-year period between 2001 and 2006, according to projections of the United States Census Bureau. The parish has had a 4.3 percent growth rate compared to 1.7 percent for its larger neighbor, Rapides Parish. Some neighboring parishes, including Winn, have experienced population decreases.[6]

Grant Parish is heavily Republican in contested elections. Mitt Romney polled 7,082 votes (81.7 percent) in his 2012 race against the Democrat U.S. President Barack H. Obama, who trailed with 1,422 votes (16.4 percent).[7] In 2008, U.S. Senator John S. McCain of Arizona swept the parish too, with 6,907 votes (80.7 percent) to Obama's 1,474 (17.2 percent).[8]

In 1996, the Republican

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 9, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Grant Parish". Center for Cultural and Eco-Tourism. Retrieved September 4, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Calhoun, Meredith".  
  5. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 141. 
  6. ^ Alexandria Daily Town Talk, December 20, 2006
  7. ^ "Grant Parish election returns, November 6, 2012". staticresults.sos.la.gov. Retrieved November 17, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Grant Parish election returns, November 4, 2008". staticresults.sos.la.gov. Retrieved November 17, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Grant Parish election returns, November 5, 1996". staticresults.sos.la.gov. Retrieved November 17, 2012. 
  10. ^ "Grant Parish election returns, November 3, 1992". staticresults.sos.la.gov. Retrieved November 17, 2012. 
  11. ^ Louisiana Secretary of State, Presidential election returns, November 2, 1976
  12. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved August 20, 2014. 
  13. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  14. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 20, 2014. 
  15. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 20, 2014. 
  16. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 20, 2014. 
  17. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 20, 2014. 
  18. ^ "American FactFinder".  
  19. ^ "African American Migration Experience: The Second Great Migration", New York Public Library, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, accessed 24 April 2008
  20. ^ "USP Pollock." Federal Bureau of Prisons. Retrieved on May 29, 2010.
  21. ^ "USP Pollock Contact Information." Federal Bureau of Prisons. Retrieved on May 29, 2010.
  22. ^ "Joe T. Cawthorn".  
  23. ^ "Jindal appoints former lawmakers to pardon board".  
  24. ^ "Col. Stephen R. Lee of Alexandria Dies at His Home Feb. 13: Industrial and Political Leader, Descendant of Famous Lees".  
  25. ^ "Sheriff Wyatt Luther Nugent, Deputy Delmer Lee Brunson [Killed]". libertychapelcemetery.org. Retrieved January 15, 2011. 

References

See also

Notable people

Name Address Zip Aged
Grant Parish Detention Center Richardson Drive, Colfax, Louisiana 71417 18+

Prison

Villages

Towns

Map of Grant Parish, Louisiana With Municipal Labels

Communities

A Company 199TH FSB (Forward Support Battalion) resides in Colfax, Louisiana. This unit deployed twice to Iraq as part of the 256TH IBCT in 2004-5 and 2010.

National Guard

Public schools in Grant Parish are operated by the Grant Parish School Board.

Education

The Federal Bureau of Prisons U.S. Penitentiary, Pollock is located in an unincorporated area in the parish, near Pollock.[20][21]

Government and infrastructure

The median income for a household in the parish was $29,622, and the median income for a family was $34,878. Males had a median income of $31,235 versus $20,470 for females. The per capita income for the parish was $14,410. About 16.90% of families and 21.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.30% of those under age 18 and 16.20% of those age 65 or over.

In the parish the population was spread out with 28.30% under the age of 18, 7.90% from 18 to 24, 28.10% from 25 to 44, 23.00% from 45 to 64, and 12.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 96.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.00 males.

In 2000, there were 7,073 households out of which 36.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.20% were married couples living together, 12.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.40% were non-families. 22.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.06.

The decreases in population from 1910–1920, and from 1940–1960, were chiefly caused by different phases of the Great Migration, as African Americans left segregation and oppression of the South to seek better opportunities in the North, during the first phase, and in the West, especially California's defense industry, in the second phase. Tens of thousands of migrants left Louisiana during times of agricultural difficulties and the collapse of agricultural labor after mechanization.[19]

As of the census[18] of 2000, there were 18,698 people, 7,073 households, and 5,276 families residing in the parish. The population density was 29 people per square mile (11/km²). There were 8,531 housing units at an average density of 13 per square mile (5/km²). The racial makeup of the parish was 85.43% White, 11.88% Black or African American, 0.89% Native American, 0.14% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.36% from other races, and 1.28% from two or more races. 1.14% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Demographics

National protected area

Adjacent parishes

Major highways

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the parish has a total area of 665 square miles (1,720 km2), of which 643 square miles (1,670 km2) is land and 22 square miles (57 km2) (3.3%) is water.[12]

Geography

The last Democrat to win in Grant Parish at the presidential level was former Gerald R. Ford, Jr., with Robert Dole as the Republican vice-presidential choice.[11]

[10]

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