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Greek legislative election, January 2015

Next Greek legislative election

On or before June 2016

All 300 seats of the Hellenic Parliament
151 seats needed for a majority
  Antonis Samaras Alexis Tsipras Evangelos Venizelos
Leader Antonis Samaras Alexis Tsipras Evangelos Venizelos
Party ND SYRIZA PASOK
Leader since 30 November 2009 9 February 2008 18 March 2012
Leader's seat Messenia Athens A Thessaloniki A
Last election 129 seats, 29.66% 71 seats, 26.89% 33 seats, 12.28%
Current seats 127[1] 72 28[1]
Seats needed Increase25 Increase79 Increase124

  Panos Kammenos Fotis Kouvelis
Leader Panos Kammenos Nikolaos Michaloliakos Fotis Kouvelis
Party ANEL XA DIMAR
Leader since 24 February 2012 1 November 1993 27 June 2010
Leader's seat Athens B Athens A Athens B
Last election 20 seats, 7.51% 18 seats, 6.92% 17 seats, 6.25%
Current seats 12[2] 16[3] 10[4]
Seats needed Increase139 Increase134 Increase139

 
Leader Dimitris Koutsoumpas
Party KKE
Leader since 14 April 2013
Leader's seat Athens B
Last election 12 seats, 4.5%
Current seats 12
Seats needed Increase139

Incumbent Prime Minister

Antonis Samaras
ND

A legislative election is planned to take place in Greece no later than 16 June 2016 to elect all 300 members to the Hellenic Parliament in accordance with the constitution. While the election is planned for 2016, due to the political and economic situation in Greece, there is a possibility that the election might be held earlier.

Contents

  • Background 1
    • Third bailout package 1.1
  • Procedure 2
  • Opinion polling 3
    • Graphical summary 3.1
    • Poll results 3.2
    • Seats 3.3
  • Notes 4
  • Participating parties 5
  • References 6

Background

Greece has suffered an economic depression since 2008 and has sought bailouts from external sources. The incumbent government (after the June 2012 election) was originally formed by New Democracy, PASOK, and DIMAR. Antonis Samaras of New Democracy is Prime Minister. PASOK and DIMAR forwent participating in Samaras' cabinet, which is thus composed of New Democracy members and independents.[5] By April 2013, the government held 167 seats, down from 179 elected in the 2012 election.[6] Of those, 9 were expelled for voting against austerity packages, and 3 left voluntarily.[6] Two former Democratic Left MPs who were expelled, Odysseas Voudouris and Paris Moutsinas, formed a new party in April 2013, saying in a letter to party leader Fotis Kouvelis that their former party had "mutated" into a centrist one.[7]

On June 21, 2013, DIMAR chose to withdraw from the governing coalition in protest of the unilateral closure of the state broadcasting corporation, ERT, 10 days before; an action opposed by both DIMAR and PASOK.[8][9][10][11][12] Samaras closed ERT without consulting either junior partner of the government.[8][9][10] The Council of State, Greece's highest administrative court, ordered that ERT be put back on the air, but the parties were unable to reach an agreement on doing so.[9][10][12] DIMAR's withdrawal from the government left it with 153 seats, leaving it with a slim three seat majority.[10][11][12] Antonis Manitakis, the Minister of Administrative Reform, and Antonis Roupakiotis, the Minister of Justice, both independents, also submitted their resignation to the government the same day.[11][12]

DIMAR said that they would still work with the government on a case-by-case basis,[12] but DIMAR MP Ioannis Michelogiannakis said that following another election the party could also work with a SYRIZA-led government.[13] DIMAR MP and member of the central committee of DIMAR, Spyros Lykoudis, stated his preference for a broader SYRIZA-DIMAR-PASOK coalition.[14]

Panos Kammenos, leader of ANEL, stated he favored a broad alliance of anti-bailout parties, excluding Golden Dawn.[15] Kammenos also proposed cooperating with SYRIZA in the 2014 local elections, suggesting their candidates could appear on the same ticket.[16] Following the rumors of a third bailout, Kammenos attempted to convince maverick ND and PASOK MPs to bring down the government.[15]

Dimitris Koutsoumpas, leader of KKE, reiterated the party's stance against cooperation with other parties, stating alliances or partnerships must be done in terms of social movements, "not from the top down, where leaders sit down and find, one, two, three things they agree on and sign a program. Those alliances have been shown to have many bad side effects for the labour movement."[17][18]

Third bailout package

On October 14, 2013, the European Central Bank (ECB) began saying Greece would need a third bailout.[19][20] ECB executive board member Joerg Asmussen said the country would need an additional six billion euros in financing, and the government would have to find an additional two billion euros in cuts[19][20] (in addition to four billion euros in cuts already planned in the draft budget.[20])

Skai TV.[21][22][23] Samaras and Venizelos both said new cuts could not be considered, since they would destabilize the government and exacerbate the recession.[21][23] The troika would not compromise on their demands for more cuts and the closure of more state firms.[24] The troika and government planned to meet in early November.[24]

The government passed the budget as is without additional measures on December 7, without the Troika's approval.[25] 153 MPs voted in favor, and 142 against.[25] Troika negotiators were originally scheduled to return to Athens in January 2014,[26] however this was later delayed until February 17.[27] The delay was caused by the Troika, which didn't want to return to Athens until they were positive that an agreement could be reached.[27]

In an interview with Bild on February 10 Samaras insisted that Greece did not need a new bailout, despite reports in Germany that the Greek Finance Ministry was working on a plan for one.[28][29] The German Finance Ministry estimated that a third bailout would be for between 10 and 20 billion euros.[28]

On September 2–4, 2014, Samaras' government met with European and IMF inspectors.[30] After the talks, eurozone officials again suggested that Greece could need a third bailout, or possibly an extension of the current program.[31] On September 9, Samaras' denied the rumors a third bailout package.[32] Samaras' also pledged to ease austerity by cutting taxes, although the Samaras' government didn't receive the troika's approval for their proposed tax cuts.[32] German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble said that it was necessary for austerity to continue.[32][33][34]

The election scene is expected to take place between pro- and anti-bailout parties. The anti-bailout, left-wing SYRIZA party has been ahead in most polls with the governing conservative New Democracy coming second.

Procedure

Voting is mandatory;[35] however none of the legally existing penalties or sanctions have ever been enforced.[36][37] 250 seats will be distributed on the basis of proportional representation, with a threshold of 3% required for entry into parliament. The other 50 seats will be awarded to the party that wins a plurality of votes, with coalitions in that regard not being counted as an overall party but having their votes counted separately for each party in the coalition, according to the election law. Parliamentary majority is achieved by a party or coalition of parties that command at least one half plus one (151 out of 300) of total seats. Blank and invalid votes, as well as votes cast for parties that fall short of the 3% threshold, are disregarded for seat allocation purposes.

Opinion polling

Graphical summary

15-day average trend line of poll results from June 2012 to the present day, with each line corresponding to a political party.

Poll results

Poll results are listed in the table below in reverse chronological order, showing the most recent first, and using the date the survey's fieldwork was done, as opposed to the date of publication. If such date is unknown, the date of publication is given instead. The highest percentage figure in each polling survey is displayed in bold, and the background shaded in the leading party's colour. In the instance that there is a tie, then no figure is shaded. The lead column on the right shows the percentage-point difference between the two parties with the highest figures. When a specific poll does not show a data figure for a party, the party's cell corresponding to that poll is shown empty.

Date Polling Firm ND SYRIZA PASOK
/ Elia
ANEL XA DIMAR KKE Potami Others Lead
5–6 Dec Pulse RC[1][2] 26.5 32.5 8.0 4.0 7.5 1.0 6.5 7.5 6.0 6.0
4–5 Dec Interview[1] 30.4 34.0 6.5 2.6 4.6 1.7 5.5 4.9 9.8 3.6
1–3 Dec Metron Analysis 27.8 34.0 5.4 3.8 7.0 5.6 9.7 6.7 6.2
28–29 Nov Pulse RC[1][2] 27.0 32.5 8.0 4.0 7.0 1.0 6.5 7.5 6.0 5.5
24–27 Nov Palmos Analysis 23.0 34.5 5.0 4.5 8.0 0.5 6.5 8.0 10.0 11.5
24–26 Nov Metron Analysis 28.2 33.1 6.4 3.7 6.1 1.3 6.6 7.5 7.1 4.9
21–24 Nov UoM[1] 24.1 33.1 4.2 3.6 7.8 1.2 6.6 7.2 12.0 9.0
21–22 Nov Pulse RC[1][2] 26.0 32.0 8.0 4.0 7.5 1.0 7.0 7.0 7.5 6.0
18–19 Nov Kapa Research[1] 27.3 31.8 8.4 3.9 7.5 7.3 8.1 5.7 4.5
17–19 Nov MRB 25.1 30.6 5.1 4.0 6.3 1.4 6.4 9.6 11.5 5.5
17–19 Nov Metron Analysis 26.3 32.9 5.2 4.0 5.0 6.2 8.3 12.1 6.6
10–17 Nov Public Issue 27.0 38.5 5.0 3.0 6.0 1.0 6.5 8.5 4.5 11.5
10–12 Nov Metron Analysis 26.5 31.3 5.3 3.8 5.8 1.6 6.1 10.0 9.6 4.8
3–5 Nov Metron Analysis 26.5 32.6 5.1 4.8 5.9 5.3 10.3 9.5 6.1
5–6 Nov Interview[1] 30.0 33.3 5.9 3.5 4.1 1.5 5.2 5.8 10.7 3.3
31 Oct–3 Nov Palmos Analysis 23.5 35.0 5.5 4.0 8.0 1.0 5.5 7.0 10.5 11.5
29–31 Oct Rass[1] 26.8 33.5 5.2 3.8 6.5 1.3 6.9 7.4 8.6 6.7
29–30 Oct Metrisi[1] 28.3 32.0 6.2 2.7 7.5 1.1 6.3 6.5 9.4 3.7
21–23 Oct Alco[1] 29.8 35.4 5.1 3.7 6.9 5.5 5.7 7.9 5.6
17–21 Oct Pulse RC[1][2] 26.5 32.5 8.0 3.5 8.5 2.0 6.5 7.0 5.5 6.0
13–20 Oct Public Issue 27.0 35.5 6.0 3.0 6.0 1.0 6.5 10.5 4.5 8.5
18 Oct UoM[1] 24.1 33.1 4.8 3.0 7.8 0.6 6.6 9.0 11.0 9.0
18 Oct Kapa Research[1] 27.5 32.1 6.8 4.5 7.5 1.3 6.2 6.6 7.5 4.6
13–15 Oct Metron Analysis 26.1 32.9 4.7 4.7 6.3 6.8 8.5 10.0 6.8
9–13 Oct GPO[1] 25.3 33.5 5.0 3.8 7.2 7.2 7.5 10.5 8.2
8–10 Oct Metrisi[1] 28.9 32.6 6.5 2.9 8.2 1.1 6.5 5.5 7.8 3.7
6–8 Oct Metron Analysis 26.2 34.1 4.6 3.3 7.0 1.3 5.3 9.1 9.1 7.9
4–8 Oct Palmos Analysis 25.0 35.5 6.5 3.0 6.0 1.0 5.0 7.5 10.5 10.5
27 Sep–4 Oct UoA[1] 23.7 34.1 6.8 3.3 10.5 0.8 6.4 7.4 7.0 10.4
29 Sep–2 Oct E-Voice[1] 25.3 30.7 5.6 2.9 7.7 1.2 6.4 6.7 13.5 5.4
15–23 Sep Public Issue 25.0 36.0 5.5 4.0 7.5 1.0 6.5 9.5 5.0 11.0
16–18 Sep Rass[1] 27.8 32.6 5.3 4.0 8.5 1.3 7.0 5.9 7.6 4.8
16–18 Sep MRB 25.3 30.0 5.3 4.1 8.5 1.3 6.5 7.1 11.8 4.7
16–18 Sep Alco[1] 28.2 33.2 5.5 3.9 7.9 2.1 5.6 5.5 8.1 5.0
11–15 Sep UoM[1] 22.8 30.4 7.0 3.8 8.2 1.3 7.0 7.0 12.7 7.6
8–10 Sep Metron Analysis[1] 27.4 31.0 6.2 4.0 7.1 7.5 6.4 10.4 3.6
2–4 Sep E-Voice[1] 25.0 28.6 6.8 3.4 10.0 1.8 9.2 5.5 9.7 3.6
1–3 Sep Alco[1] 27.8 32.4 5.5 4.5 9.4 2.9 5.9 4.7 6.9 4.6
25–28 Aug Palmos Analysis 25.0 35.0 4.5 4.0 11.5 1.5 5.0 3.5 10.0 10.0
15–16 Jul Pulse RC[1][2] 24.5 28.0 8.0 4.0 10.5 2.0 6.5 8.0 7.5 3.5
1–9 Jul Public Issue 24.0 31.0 7.5 4.5 8.5 1.5 6.5 10.5 6.0 7.0
25 Jun–4 Jul MRB 24.7 26.8 7.9 4.7 10.6 1.6 6.4 8.4 8.9 2.1
9–11 Jun Metron Analysis 24.9 27.9 8.7 38.5 3.0
3–11 Jun Public Issue 25.0 34.0 7.0 3.5 10.0 1.5 6.5 6.0 6.5 9.0
25 May 2014 EP Election 22.7 26.6 8.0 3.5 9.4 1.2 6.1 6.6 15.9 3.9
8–12 May GPO[1] 28.3 26.7 6.8 4.6 8.0 3.2 8.3 8.1 6.0 1.6
29 Apr–6 May Public Issue 29.0 29.0 6.0 3.5 8.5 3.5 7.5 5.5 7.5 0.0
24 Apr–1 May Palmos Analysis 27.1 33.0 4.1 4.0 8.6 1.9 4.9 7.5 8.9 5.9
28–30 Apr Metron Analysis 29.2 27.6 6.0 4.7 7.5 2.5 6.2 11.0 5.3 1.6
23–25 Apr Alco[1] 28.6 27.7 6.3 4.6 8.6 3.2 6.1 6.8 8.0 0.9
8–11 Apr MRB 26.5 25.3 5.9 4.9 9.9 3.4 7.3 10.0 6.8 1.2
8–9 Apr Pulse RC[1][2] 24.0 25.5 7.0 5.0 12.0 2.5 7.0 9.5 7.0 1.5
1–8 Apr Public Issue 27.5 29.0 6.0 4.0 10.0 3.5 7.0 7.0 6.0 1.5
3–5 Apr GPO[1] 26.9 25.8 7.1 5.2 8.3 3.7 8.3 10.7 4.4 1.1
3–4 Apr UoM[1] 23.5 26.0 6.0 3.5 9.0 2.5 9.0 10.5 10.0 2.5
27 Mar–3 Apr Metron Analysis 25.1 26.5 5.8 3.7 7.9 3.2 6.1 14.2 7.5 1.4
22–27 Mar Palmos Analysis 25.2 26.8 5.2 4.2 10.3 2.7 6.1 10.3 9.2 1.6
17–18 Mar Pulse RC[1][2] 24.5 26.5 7.0 5.0 12.5 2.5 7.0 8.0 7.5 2.0
11–13 Mar Alco[1] 23.6 25.1 6.7 5.9 9.1 2.9 6.6 11.5 8.6 1.5
4–10 Mar Public Issue 28.0 28.5 5.5 5.0 10.5 3.0 7.5 7.0 5.0 0.5
27 Feb–4 Mar Alco[1] 26.3 27.5 5.0 5.3 9.1 3.7 6.8 7.5 8.9 1.2
24 Feb–1 Mar Palmos Analysis 26.8 33.4 4.7 4.7 13.4 2.5 5.1 Did not exist 9.7 6.6
24–26 Feb Metron Analysis 28.5 29.2 6.4 5.9 9.7 4.7 8.7 6.9 0.7
5–11 Feb Alco[1] 28.9 30.2 5.0 5.9 9.1 3.6 8.0 9.3 1.3
6–10 Feb GPO[1] 26.5 28.1 7.4 5.8 9.5 5.0 8.0 9.7 1.6
3–7 Feb Public Issue 28.5 30.0 7.0 6.0 8.5 3.5 7.5 9.0 1.5
5 Feb Marc[1] 27.0 29.8 6.7 5.9 10.0 5.5 6.7 8.6 2.8
4–5 Feb Metrisi[1] 29.3 29.7 5.8 6.6 12.4 3.8 7.0 5.5 0.4
20–25 Jan Palmos Analysis 27.2 32.3 4.9 5.9 9.3 2.7 5.8 11.9 5.1
21–24 Jan Alco[1] 28.2 29.0 6.1 5.6 10.1 4.2 6.0 10.7 0.8
20–22 Jan Metron Analysis 29.2 30.4 6.4 4.8 10.3 3.7 5.0 10.2 1.2
20–21 Jan Pulse RC[1][2] 25.5 29.0 7.0 5.5 13.5 3.5 6.0 10.0 3.5
8–13 Jan Public Issue 28.0 31.5 6.5 4.5 10.0 3.5 6.5 9.0 3.5
2014
18–19 Dec Kapa Research[1] 28.3 29.3 7.3 5.2 9.8 3.7 6.9 Did not exist 9.5 1.0
17–19 Dec Rass[1] 29.7 30.2 5.6 5.9 7.6 4.3 7.9 9.0 0.5
13–19 Dec Palmos Analysis 24.4 31.0 6.3 6.4 9.1 5.6 6.5 10.8 6.6
16–18 Dec Pulse RC[1][2] 25.0 28.0 7.0 5.5 14.5 4.0 7.0 9.5 3.0
19 Nov–12 Dec Metron Analysis 28.5 30.2 6.5 6.9 10.3 3.9 5.5 8.2 1.7
2–11 Dec MRB[1] 27.9 29.1 6.3 6.4 11.8 4.1 6.7 7.7 1.2
29 Nov–3 Dec Pulse RC[1][2] 25.0 28.5 8.0 5.0 14.5 3.0 7.5 8.0 3.5
28–30 Nov GPO[1] 26.2 26.8 7.6 6.8 11.0 5.3 7.7 8.5 0.6
26–28 Nov Kapa Research[1] 28.9 28.1 7.7 5.7 9.9 4.3 6.3 9.2 0.8
26–28 Nov Metrisi[1] 31.0 29.7 6.2 5.9 8.8 2.3 7.1 9.1 1.3
19–25 Nov Marc 27.8 29.7 6.4 6.7 8.8 5.8 6.6 8.2 1.9
19–20 Nov Metron Analysis 29.2 29.9 6.0 5.9 10.0 3.7 5.9 9.4 0.7
12–16 Nov Palmos Analysis 26.5 30.5 7.5 6.4 11.0 3.5 6.0 8.7 4.0
12–15 Nov Alco[1] 27.8 28.3 6.4 6.7 11.1 4.3 5.3 10.2 0.5
12–14 Nov Rass[1] 30.9 28.9 5.9 6.1 7.9 4.0 7.4 8.8 2.0
6–12 Nov Pulse RC[1][2] 26.5 27.5 8.0 5.5 13.0 3.5 6.0 9.5 1.0
15–16 Oct Metron Analysis 30.3 28.9 7.1 6.4 7.6 3.6 5.9 10.3 1.4
14–16 Oct Metrisi[1] 30.3 28.6 7.1 6.5 7.9 2.6 7.1 10.0 1.7
10–16 Oct Pulse RC[1][2] 26.5 27.5 8.5 5.5 12.0 4.0 6.5 9.5 1.0
9–14 Oct Alco[1] 27.6 26.3 7.8 6.6 8.7 4.5 6.3 12.3 1.3
8–10 Oct Rass[1] 31.0 29.3 6.4 6.2 8.1 3.9 6.7 8.5 1.7
3–7 Oct GPO[1] 27.5 26.8 7.9 5.9 10.2 5.5 7.9 8.4 0.7
1–7 Oct Marc[1] 28.6 28.3 6.6 6.5 8.9 5.8 6.2 9.1 0.3
28 Sep–4 Oct Palmos Analysis 27.8 30.0 6.9 6.3 9.7 4.5 6.2 8.8 2.2
1–3 Oct MRB[1] 28.5 27.7 6.8 6.3 9.0 4.7 6.5 10.5 0.8
1–3 Oct Alco[1] 29.5 28.3 8.0 6.5 8.3 5.0 6.1 8.4 1.2
25–30 Sep VPRC 29.0 29.5 7.0 6.0 8.5 4.0 7.5 8.5 0.5
25–26 Sep Alco[1] 28.8 27.2 7.9 7.2 9.0 4.7 6.3 8.9 1.6
24–26 Sep MRB 29.0 27.5 7.2 6.9 8.9 4.3 6.5 9.7 1.5
20–23 Sep Alco[1] 28.0 25.6 8.0 6.7 9.1 4.8 6.5 11.3 2.4
19–21 Sep Rass[1] 32.7 29.2 6.8 5.5 7.5 3.2 7.3 7.8 3.5
17–19 Sep Metron Analysis 28.3 28.7 7.0 5.2 11.2 4.7 6.7 8.2 0.4
11–12 Sep Metrisi[1] 27.5 26.9 7.0 6.6 14.0 2.9 6.8 8.3 0.6
10–12 Sep Rass[1] 30.9 29.9 5.9 6.0 10.4 3.0 5.7 8.2 1.0
9–10 Sep Pulse RC[1][2] 24.5 26.0 9.0 5.0 17.0 4.0 6.5 8.0 1.5
5–10 Sep Public Issue 28.0 29.0 7.0 5.5 13.0 2.5 6.5 8.5 1.0
27–28 Aug Metron Analysis 29.1 29.0 6.8 5.1 11.7 3.1 6.9 8.3 0.1
17–18 Jul Kapa Research[1] 28.9 28.4 9.1 5.6 12.1 3.5 6.1 6.3 0.5
11–13 Jul Pulse RC[1][2] 24.0 26.5 8.5 5.0 16.5 4.0 7.5 8.0 2.5
9–10 Jul Metron Analysis 29.1 28.7 7.3 5.4 13.1 3.2 5.5 7.7 0.4
3–8 Jul Public Issue 28.5 27.5 8.0 7.0 11.0 3.0 7.0 8.0 1.0
4–5 Jul VPRC 28.0 28.5 7.0 5.5 14.5 2.5 7.5 6.5 0.5
25–27 Jun Alco[1] 27.2 25.3 8.4 6.0 14.0 3.9 5.8 9.4 1.9
25 Jun MRB 28.1 26.6 7.8 7.0 11.6 3.8 6.5 8.6 1.5
13–21 Jun MRB 27.5 27.1 6.5 6.7 12.7 4.5 6.8 8.2 0.4
18–20 Jun Rass[1] 30.7 29.4 5.0 5.1 10.0 3.7 5.8 10.3 1.3
12–13 Jun Metron Analysis 28.2 27.9 6.5 6.3 11.4 6.4 5.0 8.3 0.3
12–13 Jun Kapa Research[1] 27.4 27.0 8.1 5.6 12.1 5.0 6.5 8.3 0.4
11–13 Jun VPRC 26.5 29.0 7.0 6.0 14.0 4.5 7.0 6.0 2.5
6–11 Jun Public Issue 29.5 27.5 6.5 6.0 11.5 4.5 6.0 8.5 2.0
5–6 Jun MRB 27.9 25.6 6.4 6.9 13.4 6.2 5.8 7.8 2.3
30 May–4 Jun Pulse RC[1][2] 25.5 25.0 8.0 5.0 16.5 4.5 7.0 8.5 0.5
23–27 May GPO[1] 26.2 24.0 8.2 7.9 12.4 6.3 7.1 7.9 2.2
22–24 May Rass[1] 30.6 27.6 5.9 6.0 11.5 4.7 5.7 8.0 3.0
21–24 May Alco[1] 27.7 24.6 6.4 5.8 12.2 4.6 5.7 13.0 3.1
10–15 May Public Issue 27.5 28.0 6.5 6.0 11.5 5.5 6.5 8.5 0.5
8–13 May Marc 27.3 26.1 6.0 7.1 11.8 5.0 5.7 11.0 1.2
18 Apr–12 May AUEB[1] 25.1 24.9 7.3 4.9 14.4 5.9 7.2 10.3 0.2
23–26 Apr Alco[1] 26.4 25.6 7.1 6.5 12.0 4.8 6.3 11.3 0.8
22–24 Apr VPRC 27.0 29.5 7.0 6.0 13.0 4.5 7.0 6.0 2.5
16–17 Apr Metron Analysis 27.0 26.2 8.0 9.5 10.7 5.6 5.5 7.5 0.8
11–13 Apr Marc 27.3 27.5 6.7 7.3 12.0 5.4 6.4 7.4 0.2
9 Apr Pulse RC[1][2] 25.5 26.0 9.0 6.5 15.5 4.5 6.5 6.5 0.5
5–9 Apr Public Issue 28.5 27.5 8.0 6.5 11.0 6.5 5.5 6.5 1.0
28 Mar–1 Apr GPO[1] 25.9 25.9 9.6 8.0 11.5 6.4 7.4 5.3 0.0
28–29 Mar Alco[1] 26.5 25.7 8.4 8.0 11.7 5.3 6.9 7.5 0.8
27–28 Mar MRB 27.5 27.0 6.9 7.7 11.3 6.8 5.8 7.0 0.5
26–28 Mar Marc 27.8 27.9 6.8 7.0 11.5 5.5 5.9 7.6 0.1
20–21 Mar Kapa Research[1] 26.3 27.1 9.1 5.7 13.3 4.8 6.5 7.2 0.8
20–21 Mar VPRC 28.5 31.0 6.0 5.5 11.0 5.5 6.0 6.5 2.5
19–20 Mar Metron Analysis 25.2 25.8 9.0 8.5 11.7 6.3 5.5 8.1 0.6
15 Mar Metrisi[1] 28.4 28.0 9.2 5.9 11.9 5.0 6.4 5.2 0.4
13–15 Mar Marc 27.4 28.4 6.8 6.6 11.7 5.7 5.3 8.1 1.0
8–12 Mar Public Issue 28.5 29.5 7.5 8.0 10.0 6.0 5.5 5.0 1.0
15–22 Feb Marc 28.0 28.3 6.6 6.6 12.3 5.4 5.5 7.3 0.3
15–19 Feb Alco[1] 25.3 25.9 8.7 6.5 13.2 5.2 6.0 9.2 0.6
12–14 Feb Metron Analysis 26.4 27.6 7.5 6.2 11.5 5.6 6.4 8.9 1.2
12–13 Feb Pulse RC[1][2] 25.0 26.5 9.0 6.0 15.0 5.0 7.5 6.0 1.5
7–12 Feb Alco[1] 27.5 26.2 9.4 6.5 12.2 5.2 6.2 6.8 1.3
1–5 Feb Public Issue 28.5 29.0 7.0 8.0 11.5 6.0 5.5 4.5 0.5
31 Jan–4 Feb GPO[1] 27.0 26.6 9.5 6.6 12.8 6.1 6.4 5.0 0.4
24 Jan Pulse RC[1][2] 25.0 27.0 8.5 6.0 15.0 5.0 6.0 7.5 2.0
22–24 Jan Alco[1] 28.1 26.4 9.7 7.4 10.9 5.4 5.9 6.2 1.7
22–24 Jan MRB 29.2 27.8 7.0 6.2 11.6 5.6 5.4 7.2 1.4
22–24 Jan Kapa Research[1] 27.6 25.5 8.7 5.5 12.6 5.8 6.6 7.7 2.1
18–21 Jan Marc 28.2 27.9 7.2 7.0 12.2 5.8 5.3 6.4 0.3
17–18 Jan VPRC 29.5 29.5 6.5 6.0 12.0 5.0 5.5 6.0 0.0
15–17 Jan Metron Analysis 27.8 28.0 7.7 6.3 10.7 5.7 5.4 8.4 0.2
4–8 Jan Public Issue 29.0 28.5 8.0 8.0 10.0 7.0 5.5 4.0 0.5
2013
20–21 Dec Kapa Research[1] 25.9 27.2 7.5 4.6 11.8 6.0 6.3 Did not exist 10.7 1.3
19 Dec Marc 27.0 28.5 7.0 6.8 12.1 5.6 5.9 7.1 1.5
11–14 Dec Alco[1] 26.9 28.9 6.9 5.9 13.3 5.3 5.6 7.2 2.0
6–10 Dec Public Issue 26.0 30.5 8.0 9.0 10.5 6.5 5.5 4.0 4.5
27 Nov–6 Dec MRB 26.1 28.7 7.8 7.1 12.1 5.7 5.4 7.1 2.6
15 Nov–3 Dec Metron Analysis 26.5 29.5 6.7 8.0 12.0 6.0 5.5 5.7 3.0
23–26 Nov Marc 26.2 29.0 6.4 7.1 12.4 6.1 5.7 7.1 2.8
23–26 Nov VPRC 26.5 31.5 5.0 6.5 12.5 5.5 6.5 6.0 5.0
22–23 Nov Pulse RC[1][2] 23.5 29.0 7.5 8.0 15.0 4.5 6.0 6.5 5.5
15–17 Nov GPO[1] 24.9 27.6 9.3 8.1 12.8 6.2 5.7 5.4 2.7
8 Nov Kapa Research[1] 23.9 27.1 8.8 7.5 12.2 5.4 6.7 8.4 3.2
23–30 Oct Pulse RC[1][2] 24.5 28.0 8.0 8.0 14.0 5.0 6.0 6.5 3.5
23 Oct Marc 26.4 28.8 7.5 6.9 11.8 6.1 5.9 6.6 2.4
16–17 Oct VPRC 27.0 30.5 5.5 7.0 14.0 5.5 6.5 4.0 3.5
15–17 Oct Rass[1] 26.6 27.9 8.4 7.2 10.8 5.9 5.3 7.9 1.3
18–20 Sep MRB 29.0 28.0 10.0 6.0 11.0 5.0 5.0 6.0 1.0
17–20 Sep Rass[1] 28.0 26.7 9.5 7.3 10.8 6.0 5.3 6.4 1.3
18–19 Sep Metron Analysis 26.1 27.7 9.8 7.2 11.7 6.4 5.1 5.9 1.6
4–5 Sep VPRC 28.0 30.0 7.5 7.0 12.0 4.0 6.0 5.5 2.0
31 Aug–4 Sep Pulse RC[1][2] 27.5 26.5 9.0 7.0 11.5 5.0 5.5 8.0 1.0
29–31 Aug Alco[1] 27.8 25.6 10.3 7.6 9.7 5.8 5.3 7.9 2.2
24–25 Jul VPRC[1][2] 28.0 28.5 9.5 8.5 8.0 7.0 6.0 4.5 0.5
11–12 Jul Kapa Research[1] 27.8 24.4 13.1 7.5 8.7 6.7 5.6 6.2 3.4
10–12 Jul MRB 28.9 26.7 12.3 7.7 7.5 6.3 5.1 5.5 2.2
17 Jun 2012 Legislative Election 29.7 26.9 12.3 7.5 6.9 6.2 4.5 6.0 2.8

Seats

Opinion polls showing seat projections are displayed in the table below. The highest seat figures in each polling survey have their background shaded in the leading party's colour. In the instance that there is a tie, then no figure is shaded. 151 seats are required for an absolute majority in the Hellenic Parliament.

151 seats needed for majority
Date Polling Firm ND SYRIZA PASOK
/ Elia
ANEL XA DIMAR KKE Potami Others
24–27 Nov Palmos Analysis 64 147 14 13 22 0 18 22 0
17–19 Nov Metron Analysis 75 143 15 11 14 0 18 24 0
10–12 Nov Metron Analysis 75 138 15 11 16 0 17 28 0
3–5 Nov Metron Analysis 73 140 14 13 16 0 15 29 0
13–20 Oct Public Issue 71 144 16 8 16 0 17 28 0
13–15 Oct Metron Analysis 73 141 13 13 17 0 19 24 0
6–8 Oct Metron Analysis 73 145 13 9 20 0 15 25 0
4–8 Oct Palmos Analysis 71 150 18 9 17 0 14 21 0
27 Sep–4 Oct UoA 64 143 19 9 28 0 17 20 0
15–23 Sep Public Issue 61/72 142/150 12/17 8/13 16/24 0 15/20 20/30 0
18–19 Sep Rass 76 140 15 11 23 0 19 16 0
16–18 Sep MRB 73 136 15 12 25 0 19 20 0
16–18 Sep Alco 79 142 15 11 22 0 16 15 0
11–15 Sep UoM 66 139 20 11 24 0 20 20 0
25 May 2014 EP Election (extr.) (69) (130) (24) (11) (28) (0) (18) (20) (0)
2014
2013
17 Jun 2012 Legislative Election 129 71 33 20 18 17 12 0

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct This poll shows its results without disregarding those who are undecided or said they will abstain from voting (either physically or by voting blank). In order to obtain results comparable to other polls and the official election results, the result shown in this table will be that obtained, with a simple rule of three, from disregarding undecided and/or abstaining voters from the totals offered in the poll.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v Pulse RC and VPRC opinion polls round their data so that in the end up they show a .0 or a .5 value. This practise is maintained for these polls when disregarding undecided and/or abstaining voters from the totals so as to avoid different interpretations of the same value.

Participating parties

References

  1. ^ a b "Former mayor back in ND fold, bringing coalition's parliamentary majority to 155 (in English)".  
  2. ^ "MP quits Independent Greeks following differences on presidential vote (in English)".  
  3. ^ "Parl't lifts immunity of GD chief following heated House session (in English)".  
  4. ^ "DIMAR defection fuels upheaval (in English)".  
  5. ^ "Antonis Samaras announces cabinet (in English)".  
  6. ^ a b "Small majority for austerity raises big doubts (in English)".  
  7. ^ "Former Democratic Left MPs announce new movement". enetenglish.gr. 1 April 2013. Retrieved 17 May 2013. 
  8. ^ a b Smith, Helena (21 June 2013). "Democratic Left withdraws from Greek coalition government". London:  
  9. ^ a b c "Greece's Democratic Left party defects from coalition".  
  10. ^ a b c d Kitsantonis, Niki; Donadio, Rachel (21 June 2013). "One Coalition Partner Quits Greek Government".  
  11. ^ a b c "Democratic Left confirms it is withdrawing from government".  
  12. ^ a b c d e "Democratic Left leaves government". Enet English. 21 June 2013. Retrieved 23 June 2013. 
  13. ^ "I. Michelogiannakis: "We can work with SYRIZA" (in Greek)". capital.gr. 22 June 2013. Retrieved 23 June 2013. 
  14. ^ "PASOK-DIMAR-SYRIZA coalition, suggests Spyros Lykoudis (in Greek)". iefimerida. 16 October 2013. Retrieved 16 October 2013. 
  15. ^ a b "Kammenos urges ND, PASOK MPs to overthrow government (in English)".  
  16. ^ "Independent Greeks leader proposes working with SYRIZA (in English)".  
  17. ^ "Koutsoumpas: Proposals for alliances may be directed to the people of the KKE (in Greek)".  
  18. ^ "Koutsoumpas: "No" to cooperation at summit (in Greek)". nooz.gr. 5 December 2013. Retrieved 7 December 2013. 
  19. ^ a b "Greece Bailout to Fall Short, ECB Official Says (in English)".  
  20. ^ a b c "Samaras pleads for solidarity in Brussels but third program looms (in English)".  
  21. ^ a b "New cuts not possible, Greek prime minister tells euro area official (in English)".  
  22. ^ "New austerity measures could lead to elections, says health minister (in English)".  
  23. ^ a b "Government threatens elections if Troika demands new cuts (in Greek)". iefimerida. 16 October 2013. Retrieved 16 October 2013. 
  24. ^ a b "Troika to insist on new measures, closures of state firms (in English)".  
  25. ^ a b "Greek Parliament approves budget for 2014 (in English)".  
  26. ^ "Troika review to continue next year as Greece falls behind with bailout pledges (in English)".  
  27. ^ a b "Troika arrival likely to be postponed (in English)".  
  28. ^ a b "Greece does not need third bailout, Samaras tells Bild (in English)".  
  29. ^ "PM Samaras: Greece does not need a third bailout (in English)".  
  30. ^ "Reforms to dominate Greek talks in Paris, debt relief talks later, says source (in English)".  
  31. ^ "Eurozone ready for fresh loan (in English)".  
  32. ^ a b c "Samaras says Greece will not need third bailout (in English)".  
  33. ^ "Samaras to unveil tax breaks at TIF despite lack of troika deal (in English)".  
  34. ^ "Samaras tax cut pledges aimed at MPs rather than voters (in English)".  
  35. ^ "Constitution of Greece".  
  36. ^ Υποχρεωτική η ψήφος αλλά "παγωμένες" οι κυρώσεις [Voting is mandatory, but penalties "frozen"] (in Greek).  
  37. ^ Προεδρικό Διάταγμα 96/2007 [Presidential Decree 96/2007] (in Greek). Article 117, Clause 1: The elector who unjustifiably does not vote is punished with imprisonment of [at least] one month and up to one year. 
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