World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Hair highlighting

Article Id: WHEBN0012686012
Reproduction Date:

Title: Hair highlighting  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: List of hairstyles, List of Johnny Test characters, Disappearing blonde gene, Titian hair, Singapore Girl
Collection: Hair Color
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Hair highlighting

Hair with blonde highlights

Hair highlighting/lowlighting refers to changing a person's hair color, using lightener or haircolor to color hair strands. There are four basic types of highlights: foil highlights, hair painting, frosting, and chunking. Highlights can be done in natural or unnatural colors. Color highlights come in four categories: temporary, semi-permanent, demi-permanent and permanent. Hair lightened with bleach is permanent.

Contents

  • Basic foil highlighting 1
  • Hair painting 2
  • Frosting 3
  • Chunking 4
  • References 5

Basic foil highlighting

Foil highlighting is the process of using foil to separate strands of hair which will be lightened from strands of hair which will remain its natural color. The process is done by applying lightener to the hair that has been woven and separated using an applicator brush. The foil is then folded to protect the hair and surrounding area during the "processing" time. This is the amount of time required to achieve the desired results. In highlighting hair, hydrogen peroxide mixed with pigment is used to change the color of the strand.[1] This process is also used in applying "lowlights" to the hair. In this process, hair dyes are used to create strands of hair that are darker than the natural color.[2]

Hair painting

Coloring a young girl's hair with temporary spray paint

Hair painting is a method of highlighting hair that may be done at home. Hair painting methods are often permanent and employ a simple hair-painting brush. Hair painting is also used with temporary and semi-permanent types of brushes. While brushes are commonly used in hair painting, one may also use combs to paint or highlight thin-sized strands of hair.

  • Balayage is a technique referring to free-form painting on clean, styled hair. The results are subtle, and thus more natural-looking than foiling or chunking.
  • Leopard hair highlights or Leopard hair print consist in creating hair highlights with a leopard pattern. The process to create leopard spots effects can be realized first bleaching in spots a hair tuft and then coloring with a brown tint the external parts of the bleached spots. It is even common to use funky and eccentric colors for this effect. This kind of hair process started as urban Street_fashion as new trend, in fact is often combined with weird haircuts. Gallery and How to Leopard hair print.[3] It is possible to apply the leopard hair print both on long hair tuft or on shaven head parts. Another similar motif used for spot hair highlight is the cheetah hair pattern.

Frosting

Frosting refers to the process of free-hand lightening the tips of the hair, and is generally performed on men with short hair.

Chunking

Chunking refers to a style of highlight which is larger and thicker than a traditional highlight, rather than to a method of creating highlights. Chunky highlights are generally offered in a wider variety of bold natural colors, as well as a large number of artificial, or unnatural, colors and are used to create more contrast, rather than subtle texture, as in traditional, thinner highlights.

References

  1. ^ Green, Athlyn (April 25, 2008). "Lighten Your Hair Using Hydrogen Peroxide". Beyond Jane. Retrieved April 25, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Hot Hair Color Trends for Women". Guillermo's Salon. 4/3/2014. Retrieved 8/6/2014. 
  3. ^ "Gallery and How to Leopard Hair Print". 

Media related to at Wikimedia Commons

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.