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Harpalyke (moon)

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Harpalyke (moon)

Harpalyke ( ; Greek: Αρπαλύκη), also known as Jupiter XXII, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2000, and given the temporary designation S/2000 J 5.[1][2] In August 2003, the moon was named[3] after Harpalyke, the incestuous daughter of Klymenos, who in some accounts was also a lover of Zeus (Jupiter).

Harpalyke belongs to the Ananke group, believed to be the remnants of a break-up of a captured heliocentric asteroid.[4][5] It is about 4 kilometres in diameter[6] and appears grey (color index R-V=0.43), similar to C-type asteroids.[7] The satellite orbits Jupiter at an average distance of 21,064 Mm in 624.542 Earth days, at an inclination of 147° to the ecliptic (147° to Jupiter's equator) with an eccentricity of 0.2441.

References

  1. ^ Satellites of JupiterIAUC 7555: January 5, 2001 (discovery)
  2. ^ S/2000 J 2, S/2000 J 3, S/2000 J 4, S/2000 J 5, S/2000 J 6MPEC 2001-A28: January 5, 2001 (discovery and ephemeris)
  3. ^ Satellites of JupiterIAUC 7998: 2002 October 22 (naming the moon)
  4. ^ Sheppard, S. S.; and Jewitt, D. C.; An Abundant Population of Small Irregular Satellites Around Jupiter, Nature, Vol. 423 (May 2003), pp. 261-263
  5. ^ Nesvorný, D.; Alvarellos, J. L. A.; Dones, L.; and Levison, H. F.; Orbital and Collisional Evolution of the Irregular Satellites, The Astronomical Journal, Vol. 126 (2003), pp. 398–429
  6. ^ Sheppard, S. S.; Jewitt, D. C.; and Porco, C. C.; Jupiter's Outer Satellites and Trojans, in Jupiter: The Planet, Satellites and Magnetosphere, edited by Fran Bagenal, Timothy E. Dowling, and William B. McKinnon, Cambridge Planetary Science, Vol. 1, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-81808-7, 2004, pp. 263-280
  7. ^ Grav, T.; Holman, M. J.; Gladman, B. J.; and Aksnes, K.; Photometric Survey of the Irregular Satellites, Icarus, Vol. 166 (2003), pp. 33-45
  1. Ephemeris IAU-MPC NSES
  2. Mean orbital parameters NASA JPL

External links

  • David Jewitt pages
  • Scott Sheppard pages
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