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Health in Ukraine

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Health in Ukraine

This article is about the current situation of Health in Ukraine.

Demographic decline

Ukraine is considered to be in a demographic crisis due to its high death rate and a low birth rate. The current Ukrainian birth rate is 11 births/1,000 population, and the death rate is 16.3 deaths/1,000 population. A factor contributing to the relatively high death is a high mortality rate among working-age males from preventable causes such as alcohol poisoning and smoking.[1]

In 2008, the country's population was one of the fastest declining in the world at -5% growth.[2][3] The UN warned that Ukraine's population could fall by as much as 10 million by 2050 if trends did not improve.[4]

Major health issues

An ambulance in Kiev

High blood pressure and obesity

According to a study, entitled "Main reasons for the high death rate in Ukraine" conducted by the World Bank and released in December 2010 every third Ukrainian aged 18–65, including every fifth aged 18–25, had a high blood pressure. Almost 29% of the respondents suffered overweight, and 20% suffered from obesity.[5]

Smoking[6]

According to the above-mentioned 2010 World Bank study 36% (28.6% is the average in Europe) of Ukrainians smoke tobacco, including 31% of those who smoke every day. Men with primary education and women with higher education are inclined to smoking. Some 80% of daily smokers are men. The average age that daily smokers start the habit is decreasing, and at present is 16 years. In the younger age group there are four times as many smokers as in the older age group. The smallest percentage of smokers is to be found in the west of the country (24.6%), while the largest is in the east (34%).

HIV/AIDS

Ukraine has one of the fastest growing HIV/AIDS epidemics in the world. About 1.63 percent of Ukrainian adults, or about 756,300 citizens, were estimated to be living with HIV/AIDS in 2007, up from 1.46 percent of the population in 2005, or 685,600 citizens, according to UNAIDS. The statistics only reflect official cases, while those infected is likely higher according to UNAIDS.[7] The number of HIV/AIDS cases in Ukraine reduced by 200 or 3.9% to 4,900 in the period of January–November 2008, compared with the corresponding period of last year. Ukraine has one of the highest rates of increase of HIV/AIDS cases in Eastern Europe.[8]

Reforms

As of March 2009 the Ukrainian government to reforming the health care system, by a.o. the creation of a national network of family doctors and improvements in the medical emergency services.[9] Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko wanted (in November 2009) to start introducing a public healthcare system based on health insurance in the spring of 2010.[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ "What Went Wrong with Foreign Advice in Ukraine?". The World Bank Group. Retrieved 2008-01-16. 
  2. ^ "Field Listing - Population growth rate". CIA World Factbook. Retrieved 2008-07-05. 
  3. ^ State Statistics Committee of Ukraine Retrieved on 07-09-09
  4. ^ UN population estimates UN Retrieved on 07-09-09
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ [2]
  7. ^ Ukraine losing HIV/AIDS fight, Kyiv Post (7 May 2008)
  8. ^ United Nations Registers More Children With AIDS In Ukraine, Ukrainian News Agency (December 1, 2008)
  9. ^ National network of family doctors to be established by 2010, says health minister, Interfax-Ukraine (March 30, 2009)
  10. ^ Ukraine to start introducing insurance-based healthcare system in spring of 2010, Kyiv Post (November 24, 2009)

External links

  • World Health Organization (WHO): Ukraine
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