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Henry W. Lord

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Henry W. Lord

Henry W. Lord
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Michigan's 1st congressional district district
In office
March 4, 1879 – March 3, 1881
Preceded by John S. Newberry
Succeeded by William C. Maybury
Personal details
Born (1821-03-08)March 8, 1821
Northampton, Massachusetts, U.S.
Died January 25, 1891(1891-01-25) (aged 69)
Butte, Montana, U.S.
Resting place Elmwood Cemetery
Detroit, Michigan
Citizenship US
Political party Republican
Profession Merchant
Diplomat
Politician

Henry William Lord (March 8, 1821 – January 25, 1891) was a merchant, diplomat and politician from the U.S. state of Michigan. He served as the United States consul to Manchester, England and as a U.S. Representative from the state of Michigan.

Early life

Lord was born in Northampton, Massachusetts[1] and received an academic education in Andover, Massachusetts.[2] He studied law but did not practice. He moved to Detroit, Michigan in 1839. Four years later, he went to Pontiac, Michigan and engaged in agricultural and mercantile pursuits, and foreign service. In 1876, he returned to Detroit.[3]

Political career

In 1861, he was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln to become United States consul to Manchester, England. He served in that position until his resignation in 1867.[4] While in that post, he developed plans that improved consular services.[5]

He served on the Michigan board of corrections and charities from 1871-1882,[6] and as trustee for the Michigan Military Academy from 1878-1880.[7][8] In 1876, he served as a Presidential elector from Michigan.[9]

Lord was elected as a Republican candidate from Michigan's first congressional district to the Forty-seventh Congress, serving from March 4, 1881 to March 3, 1883.[10][11] He was an unsuccessful candidate for re-election in 1882.

He was appointed by President Chester Arthur to become register of the United States land office at Creelsburg, North Dakota on August 1, 1883. The office was transferred to Devils Lake, North Dakota on January 17, 1884 and Lord continued as register until April 18, 1888.[12]

Death

Lord was killed in a railroad accident near Butte, Montana on January 25, 1891. He is interred in Elmwood Cemetery in Detroit.[13]

References

  1. ^ The Society (1903). Pioneer Collections, Volume 3. The Society. p. 266. 
  2. ^ United States. Congress (1882). Official Congressional Directory. United States. Congress. p. 38. 
  3. ^ Headley, Phineas Camp (1882). Public Men of To-day: Being Biographies of the President and Vice-president of the United States, Each Member of the Cabinet, the United States Senators and the Members of the House of Representatives of the Forty-seventh Congress, the Chief Justice and the Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States, and of the Governors of the Several States. 1st series. S. S. Scranton & Company. p. 467. 
  4. ^ United States. Congress (1882). Official Congressional Directory. United States. Congress. p. 38. 
  5. ^ Herringshaw, Thomas William (1914). Herringshaw's National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States; Illustrated with Three Thousand Vignette Portraits. American Publishers' Association. p. 565. 
  6. ^ W.S. George & Company (1879). Red Book for the ... Legislature of the State of Michigan. W.S. George & Company. p. 418. 
  7. ^ Free Press Book and Job Printing Establishmen (1880). Annual Catalogue of the Michigan Military Academy. Free Press Book and Job Printing Establishmen. p. 3. 
  8. ^ Robert Smith Printing Company and, State Printers (1879). Joint Documents of the State of Michigan, Volume 1. Robert Smith Printing Company. p. 109. 
  9. ^ Michigan (1893). Michigan Manual. Michigan. p. 252. 
  10. ^ Chardavoyne, David Gardner (2012). United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan: People, Law, and Politics. Wayne State University Press. p. 134. 
  11. ^ Headley, Phineas Camp (1882). Public Men of To-day: Being Biographies of the President and Vice-president of the United States, Each Member of the Cabinet, the United States Senators and the Members of the House of Representatives of the Forty-seventh Congress, the Chief Justice and the Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States, and of the Governors of the Several States. 1st series. S. S. Scranton & Company. p. 798. 
  12. ^ Herringshaw, Thomas William (1914). Herringshaw's National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States; Illustrated with Three Thousand Vignette Portraits. American Publishers' Association. p. 565. 
  13. ^ United States Congress and, MichaelmW. H. (1883). Official Congressional Directory, Volume 47. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 85. 

External links


United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
John S. Newberry
United States Representative for the 1st Congressional District of Michigan
1881– 1883
Succeeded by
William C. Maybury
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