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Hot Springs, South Dakota

Hot Springs, South Dakota
mni kȟáta
City
Welcome Sign in Hot Springs
Welcome Sign in Hot Springs
Motto: "Southern Gateway To The Black Hills"
Location in Fall River County and the state of South Dakota
Location in Fall River County and the state of South Dakota
Coordinates:
Country United States
State South Dakota
County Fall River
Incorporated 1890[1]
Government
 • Mayor Don DeVries
Area[2]
 • Total 3.61 sq mi (9.35 km2)
 • Land 3.61 sq mi (9.35 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 3,448 ft (1,051 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 3,711
 • Estimate (2013)[4] 3,514
 • Density 1,028.0/sq mi (396.9/km2)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP code 57747
Area code(s) 605
FIPS code 46-30220[5]
GNIS feature ID 1265256[6]
Website City Website

Hot Springs (Lakota: mni kȟáta;[7] "hot water") is a city in Fall River County, South Dakota, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 3,711. It is the county seat of Fall River County.[8] In addition, neighboring Oglala Lakota County contracts the duties of Auditor, Treasurer and Register of Deeds to the Fall River County authority in Hot Springs.[8]

Contents

  • Overview 1
  • History 2
  • Geography and climate 3
  • Demographics 4
    • 2010 census 4.1
    • 2000 census 4.2
  • Notable people 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Overview

Hot Springs, South Dakota, ca. 1900

Hot Springs is one of the warmest places in South Dakota, with an annual mean temperature of 48.6 °F (9.2 °C).[9] Some of the attractions in the Hot Springs area are the Mammoth Site of Hot Springs and Evans Plunge, built in 1890, with its naturally warm 87 °F (31 °C) spring water. The town is a gateway to the attractions of the southern Black Hills, particularly Wind Cave National Park. Hot Springs holds the annual Miss South Dakota pageant. In recognition of its historic value, the National Trust for Historic Preservation listed Hot Springs as one of its 2009 Dozen Distinctive Destinations.[10]

The city center contains over 35 sandstone buildings.[10] Hot Springs is also the home of a United States Department of Veterans Affairs hospital (Black Hills Healthcare System - Hot Springs Campus), which was designated in 2011 as a National Historic Landmark. Formerly known as the Battle Mountain Sanitarium, the 100-bed center was built in 1907 for patients suffering from rheumatism or tuberculosis. In the early 21st century, it offers extensive outpatient treatment, acute hospital care, PTSD treatment, and an alcohol and drug treatment facility.

The Battle Mountain Sanitarium was declared a National Treasure by the National Trust for Historic Preservation following a December 2011 proposal announced by the Eric Shinseki to show how they believe VA leadership manipulated data to justify the proposed closure of the Landmark. After Veterans Health Administration scandal of 2014, Hot Springs was visited by members of the United States House Committee on Veterans' Affairs for a Congressional field hearing regarding the proposed closure and the committee heard testimony from members of Save the VA Committee and others opposed to the closure as well as two VA administrators in favor of the closure.[11]

History

The Sioux and Cheyenne people had long frequented the area, appreciating its warm springs. According to several accounts, including a ledger art piece by the Oglala Lakota artist Amos Bad Heart Bull, Native Americans considered the springs sacred.[12][13] European settlers arrived in the second half of the 19th century. They first named this city as Minnekahta; it was renamed in 1882. The present name is a translation of the Native American name.[14] A variety of health resorts were built on the basis of the springs.[15][16]

Geography and climate

Hot Springs is located at (43.4311, -103.4776).[17] The Fall River runs through the city.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.61 square miles (9.35 km2), all of it land.[2]

Hot Springs has been assigned the ZIP code 57747 and the FIPS place code 30220.

Climate data for Hot Springs, South Dakota (1981–2010)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 41.0
(5)
44.0
(6.7)
53.0
(11.7)
61.9
(16.6)
71.1
(21.7)
80.5
(26.9)
89.0
(31.7)
88.2
(31.2)
78.8
(26)
65.0
(18.3)
49.6
(9.8)
39.7
(4.3)
63.5
(17.5)
Average low °F (°C) 14.4
(−9.8)
16.1
(−8.8)
23.8
(−4.6)
31.8
(−0.1)
42.0
(5.6)
50.7
(10.4)
57.3
(14.1)
55.7
(13.2)
45.1
(7.3)
33.8
(1)
22.9
(−5.1)
13.9
(−10.1)
33.9
(1.1)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 0.35
(8.9)
0.49
(12.4)
1.05
(26.7)
1.97
(50)
3.13
(79.5)
2.83
(71.9)
2.39
(60.7)
1.77
(45)
1.43
(36.3)
1.28
(32.5)
0.50
(12.7)
0.38
(9.7)
17.56
(446)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 4.5
(11.4)
5.1
(13)
7.3
(18.5)
3.5
(8.9)
0.4
(1)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.1
(0.3)
0.9
(2.3)
3.6
(9.1)
5.7
(14.5)
31.0
(78.7)
Source: NOAA[18]

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 3,711 people, 1,730 households, and 910 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,028.0 inhabitants per square mile (396.9/km2). There were 1,958 housing units at an average density of 542.4 per square mile (209.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 85.4% White, 1.1% African American, 9.3% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.2% from other races, and 3.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.1% of the population.

There were 1,730 households of which 21.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.4% were married couples living together, 11.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 47.4% were non-families. 42.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 20.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.03 and the average family size was 2.79.

The median age in the city was 49.8 years. 19.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 18.8% were from 25 to 44; 32.9% were from 45 to 64; and 23.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 50.4% male and 49.6% female.

2000 census

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 4,129 people, 1,704 households, and 962 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,417.3 people per square mile (547.8/km²). There were 1,900 housing units at an average density of 652.2 per square mile (252.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 88.06% White, 0.39% African American, 7.82% Native American, 0.36% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.19% from other races, and 3.12% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.91% of the population.

There were 1,704 households out of which 23.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.0% were married couples living together, 10.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.5% were non-families. 39.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.16 and the average family size was 2.88.

In the city the population was spread out with 24.0% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 19.4% from 25 to 44, 25.7% from 45 to 64, and 24.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females there were 113.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 106.7 males.

As of 2000 the median income for a household in the city was $27,079, and the median income for a family was $35,786. Males had a median income of $28,750 versus $18,333 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,618. About 8.1% of families and 14.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.9% of those under age 18 and 12.4% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people

References

  1. ^ "SD Towns" (PDF).  
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010".  
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  4. ^ a b "Population Estimates".  
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  6. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  7. ^ Ullrich, Jan F. (2014). New Lakota Dictionary (2nd ed.). Bloomington, IN: Lakota Language Consortium.  
  8. ^ a b "Welcome". South Dakota Association of County Officials. Retrieved 2009-11-24. 
  9. ^ "Hot Springs, South Dakota 1961-1990 NCDC Monthly Normals".  
  10. ^ a b "National Trust for Historic Preservation Names Hot Springs, South Dakota to its 2009 list of America’s Dozen Distinctive Destinations".  
  11. ^ "Hot Springs VA gains at least one new friend". Retrieved 2014-09-10. 
  12. ^ Linea Sundstrom (1997-07-01). "The Sacred Black Hills – An Ethnohistorical Review". Great Plains Quarterly via Digital Commons at University of Nebraska – Lincoln. Retrieved 2014-08-25. 
  13. ^ "THE BLACK HILLS AS SACRED GROUND: THE CHRONOLOGY AND CONTROVERSY" (PDF).  
  14. ^ Chicago and North Western Railway Company (1908). A History of the Origin of the Place Names Connected with the Chicago & North Western and Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railways. p. 84. 
  15. ^ "Hot Springs, South Dakota".  
  16. ^ Lund, John W. (December 1997). "Hot Springs, South Dakota" (PDF). Geo-Heat Center Quarterly Bulletin 8 (4): 6–11. Retrieved 2014-02-09. 
  17. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  18. ^ "NOWData - NOAA Online Weather Data".  
  19. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  20. ^  
  21. ^ Biodata-Charles Eastman
  22. ^ Sirvaitis, Karen (1 September 2001). South Dakota. Lerner Publications. p. 69.  

External links

  • Hot Springs Chamber of Commerce
  • Hot Springs School District
  • Fall River County Courthouse
  • Hot Springs Star
  • House Committee on Veterans Affairs Field Hearing August 14, 2014
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