Idh3a

Isocitrate dehydrogenase 3 (NAD+) alpha
Identifiers
1.1.1.41
RNA expression pattern

Isocitrate dehydrogenase [NAD] subunit alpha, mitochondrial is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the IDH3A gene.[1][2]

Interactive pathway map

Click on genes, proteins and metabolites below to link to respective articles. [§ 1]

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Isocitrate dehydrogenases catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to 2-oxoglutarate. These enzymes belong to two distinct subclasses, one of which utilizes NAD(+) as the electron acceptor and the other NADP(+). Five isocitrate dehydrogenases have been reported: three NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases, which localize to the mitochondrial matrix, and two NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases, one of which is mitochondrial and the other predominantly cytosolic. NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases catalyze the allosterically regulated rate-limiting step of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Each isozyme is a heterotetramer that is composed of two alpha subunits, one beta subunit, and one gamma subunit. The protein encoded by this gene is the alpha subunit of one isozyme of NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase.[2]

References

Further reading



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