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Imperial General Staff

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Imperial General Staff

Chief of the General Staff (CGS) has been the title of the professional head of the British Army since 1964. The CGS is a member of both the Chiefs of Staff Committee and the Army Board. Prior to 1964 the title was Chief of the Imperial General Staff (CIGS). Since 1959, the post has been immediately subordinate to the Chief of the Defence Staff, the post held by the professional head of the British Armed Forces.

The title was also used for five years between the demise of the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in 1904 and the introduction of Chief of the Imperial General Staff in 1909. The post was then held by General Sir Neville Lyttelton and, briefly, by Field Marshal Sir William Nicholson.

Throughout the existence of the post the Chief of the General Staff has been the First Military Member of the Army Board.[1]

The current Chief of the General Staff is General Sir Peter Wall – having succeeded his predecessor, General Sir David Richards in September 2010.

Chiefs of the General Staff (1904–1909)

Rank Name Image In office Notes Reference
General Sir Neville Lyttelton 12 February 1904 – 2 April 1908 First CGS [2]
Field Marshal Sir William Nicholson 90px 2 April 1908 – 22 November 1909 [3]

Chiefs of the Imperial General Staff, 1909–1964

Rank Name Image Assumed office Notes Reference
Field Marshal Sir William Nicholson 90px 22 November 1909 – 15 March 1912 [4]
Field Marshal Sir John French 15 March 1912 – 6 April 1914 [5]
General Sir Charles Douglas 6 April 1914 – 25 October 1914 [6]
Lieutenant General Sir James Wolfe-Murray October 1914–26 September 1915 [7]
General Sir Archibald Murray 26 September 1915 – December 1915 [8]
General Sir William Robertson 23 December 1915 – February 1918 [9]
Field Marshal Sir Henry Wilson 19 February 1918 – 19 February 1922 [10]
Field Marshal Frederick Rudolph Lambart, 10th Earl of Cavan 19 February 1922 – 19 February 1926 [11]
Field Marshal Sir George Milne 19 February 1926 – 19 February 1933 [12]
Field Marshal Sir Archibald Montgomery-Massingberd February 1933 – February 1936 [13]
Field Marshal Sir Cyril Deverell February 1936–6 December 1937 [14]
General John Vereker, 6th Viscount Gort 6 December 1937 – 3 September 1939 [15]
General Sir Edmund Ironside 4 September 1939 – 26 May 1940 [16]
Field Marshal Sir John Dill 26 May 1940 – 25 December 1941 [17]
Field Marshal Sir Alan Brooke 25 December 1941 – 25 June 1946 [18]
Field Marshal Sir Bernard "Monty" Montgomery 26 June 1946 – 31 November 1948 [19][20]
Field Marshal Sir William Slim 31 November 1948 – 1 November 1952 [21]
Field Marshal Sir John Harding 1 November 1952 - 29 September 1955 [22]
Field Marshal Sir Gerald Templer 90px 29 September 1955 - 29 September 1958 [23]
Field Marshal Sir Francis Festing 29 September 1958 - 1 November 1961 [24]
Field Marshal Sir Richard Hull 1 November 1961 - April 1964 Last CIGS and first CGS; first Army officer to be Chief of the Defence Staff, 1965–1967 [25][26][27]

Chiefs of the General Staff (post 1964)

Rank Name Image Assumed office Notes Reference
Field Marshal Sir Richard Hull (Until 8 February 1965) The post of Chief of the Imperial General Staff was renamed Chief of the General Staff in the 1960s
Field Marshal Sir James Cassels 8 February 1965 [28]
Field Marshal Sir Geoffrey Baker 1 March 1968 Master Gunner, St James's Park, 1970–1976; Constable of the Tower of London, 1975–1980 [29][30][31]
Field Marshal Sir Michael Carver 1 April 1971 CDS, 1973–1976 [32][33]
General Sir Peter Hunt 19 July 1973 Constable of the Tower of London, 1980–1985 [34][35]
Field Marshal Sir Roland Gibbs 15 July 1976 Constable of the Tower of London, 1985–1990 [36][37]
Field Marshal Sir Edwin Bramall 14 July 1979 Lord Lieutenant of Greater London, 1986–1998; CDS, 1982–1985 [38][39][40]
Field Marshal Sir John Stanier 1 August 1982 First CGS after World War II not to have served in that war; Constable of the Tower of London, 1990–1996 [35][41][42]
Field Marshal Sir Nigel Bagnall 28 July 1985 [43]
Field Marshal Sir John Chapple 10 September 1988 [44]
Field Marshal Sir Peter Inge 14 February 1992 CDS, 1994–1997; Last CGS to hold the rank of field marshal; Constable of the Tower of London, 1996–2001 [35][45][46]
Field Marshal Sir Charles Guthrie 15 March 1994 CDS, 1997–2004. Promoted to the honorary rank of field marshal in June 2012.[47] [46][48]
General Sir Roger Wheeler 3 February 1997 Constable of the Tower of London, 2001–2009 [49][50]
General Sir Michael Walker 17 April 2000 Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS), 2003–2006 [51][52]
General Sir Mike Jackson 1 February 2003 [53]
General Sir Richard Dannatt 29 August 2006 Currently Constable of the Tower [54][55]
General Sir David Richards 28 August 2009 Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS), 2010–2013 [56][57]
General Sir Peter Wall 15 September 2010 Incumbent. [58]

See also

References

Bibliography

  • Heathcote, T.A. (1999). The British Field Marshals 1736–1997. Pen & Sword Books Ltd. ISBN 0-85052-696-5

External links

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