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Irene Kipchumba

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Title: Irene Kipchumba  
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Irene Kipchumba

Irene Kwambai Kipchumba (born 25 October 1978) is a Kenyan long-distance runner.

Her first major medal came at the 2004 African Championships in Athletics where she took silver in the 10,000 metres behind Eyerusalem Kuma. She also won the Cursa de Bombers that year and repeated as the winner in 2005, setting a course record in the process. She ran at the 2005 World Championships in Athletics and was tenth in the women's 10,000 m. Her 2006 season was highlighted by a win at the Vitry-sur-Seine Half Marathon. She won the women's 5K race at the Prague Grand Prix the following year.

Kwambai was selected to represent Kenya in the 10,000 m at the 2007 All-Africa Games and she won the bronze medal. She was the silver medallist in the event at the 2007 World Military Games a few months later, where she was beaten by her national rival Doris Changeywo.[1]

She ran at the Paul Tergat's Baringo Half Marathon in November 2010 and was fourth in the race.[2]

Achievements

Year Competition Venue Position Notes
2000 World Cross Country Championships Vilamoura, Portugal 11th Long race
2004 African Championships Brazzaville, Congo 2nd 10,000 m
World Athletics Final Monte Carlo, Monaco 9th 5000 m
2005 World Cross Country Championships Saint-Etienne, France 11th Long race
World Championships Helsinki, Finland 10th 10,000 m
World Athletics Final Monte Carlo, Monaco 9th 5000 m
2006 World Athletics Final Stuttgart, Germany 10th 5000 m
2007 All-Africa Games Algiers, Algeria 3rd 10,000 m[3]

Road running

  • 2006 Vitry-sur-Seine Half Marathon - 1st [4]
  • 2007 Vitry-sur-Seine Half Marathon - 2nd [5]
  • 2009 Prague Half Marathon - 2nd (time 1:09:27, PB)[6]

Personal bests

References



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